Skip to main content

Full text of "La Vie Collegienne: Lebanon Valley College Student Newspaper (Spring 1930)"

See other formats


DON'T MISS IT! 
gASKETBALL PREMIER 
SWARTHMORE vs. L. V. 




CURE POST-HOLIDAY 
BLUES BY SEEING "HIS 
PRIVATE SECRETARY" 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



VOLUME V 



ANNVILLE, PENNSY LVANIA, THURSDAY, JANUARY 9, 1930. 



No. 12. 



TEAMS PREPARE FOR 
FORENSIC CONTESTS 



DEBATERS WORK ON 
SPEECHES FOR 
FIRST MEET 



With the opening of college after 
the Michaelmas vacation, the debat- 
ers are hard at work preparing for the 
Intercollegiate debates in February 
and March. The subject for debate 
this year is "Resolved, That the 
United States Should Withdraw from 
the Kellogg Peace Pact." 

The prospects for good debatin 
teams th"s year are excellent. Instead 
of dividing forces as hitherto, the 
"eds" and "co-eds" are combining 
forces, believing that in union there 
is strength. 

The following have joined the de- 
bating squad: Hilda Hess, Gladys 
Knaub, Martha Daley, Eulalic Mar- 
ton, Elizabeth Lefever, Helen 
Franklin, Arline Heckrote, Russell 
Etter, Warren Rugh, Gerald Heil- 
riian, and Horace Hallman. There is 
room for any others who may desire 
to join the squad. It will be observed 
the girls outnumber the men. 

While the debating schedule is by 
no means complete, the following 
teams have* been scheduled: Juniata, 
Albright, Ursinus, and Bucknell. 

The success of any team is in large 
part dependent upon the support it 
receives from the student body. If 

that support is withheld, then that 
team cannot put forth its best efforts 
either away or at home. The student 

(Continued on Page 4) 

CAROLERS BRING JOY 

TO NEEDY FAMILY 



BASKETBALL SCHEDULE 

SEASON 193 > 



DELPHIAN WORKS ON 
ANNIVERSARY PLANS 

COMMITTEES NAMED 
FOR EVENT OF 
FEBRUARY 



Thursday evening preceding the 
Christmas vacation the annual custom 
°f singing carols about town was ob 
served by a large group of students 

This year they also extended their 
activity t furnish Christmas cheer to 
an unfortunate family living on the 
outskirts of Annville. Starting from 
North Hall steps, after the presenta- 
tion of the Christmas pageant,,, about 
thirty or forty carolers set out for 
their home. The family consists of 
tn e father and three small children 
the mother having died three week 
before. Their house had recently 
hurncd almost completely and the 
n ew one was then being built. With 
these reverses everything pointed to 
* dull Christmas season for the chil 
dren. The carolers did their best to 
brin g cheer to the family. Carols 
• We re sung and numerous baskets of 
f, "uit and other things, provided by 
the Y. W. C. A. and the Y. M. C. A. 
Wer e given. Alcesta Slichter delight 
e ^ the kiddies with a recitation, 
^ ln 't Gonna Cry No More." 

Af ter leaving the place, the group 
| Ve nt about the town, stopping at the 
homes of the Professors to sing cat 
ols - At several places they were re 
War ded b y oranges, apples, cakes 

ari( l candy. Everyone in the com 

pan y had a delightful time. 



Fri., Jan. 10, Swarthmore, home. 

Wed., Jan. 15, Dickinson, Carlisle. 

Fri., Jan. 17, Susquehanna, home. 

Mon., Jan. 20, Mt. St. Mary's, 
Emmitsburg. 

Tues., Jan. 21, Western Marland, 
Westminster. 

Sat., Feb. 1, Villanova, home. 

Wed., Feb. 5, Gettysburg, Gettys- 
burg. 

Sat., Feb. 8, Ursinus, home. 
Wed., Feb. 12, F. & M., Lancaster. 
Fri., Feb. 14, Susquehanna, Sel- 

insgrove. 
Fri., Feb. 21, Albright, Reading. 
Wed., Feb. 26, Muhlenburg, home. 
Sat., March r, F. & M., home. 
Wed., March 5, Albright, home. 



QUINTET PRIME FOR 
SWARTHMORE TUSSU 



SQUAD SHOWS GOOD 
MATERIAL AFTER 
INTENSE WORK 



HAVE YOU EVER SPENT A 
WEEKEND AT A COUN- 
TRY MANSION? 



The Delphian Literary Society is 
busy these days planning for a big- 
ger and better anniversary, which 
will fall this year on Washington's 
Birthday. A great deal of work and 
interest is being shown in the selec- 
tion of their anniversary play which 
has not yet been decided upon. 

The committees which are working 
to make this year's program a suc- 
cess are: 

Judiciary: Ruth March, vice-presi- 
dent, Dorothy Thompson, Billie Cole- 
man, Dorothy Boyer, Gladys Hershey. 

Play: Hilda D. Buckley, chairman; 
Caroline Fisher and Ruth Lilier. 

Program: Blanche Cochran, chair- 
man; Henrietta Wagner, Dorothy Ha- 
ter, Ruth Shroyer. 

Property: Ruth March, chairman 
Sara Ensminger, Elizabeth Ulrich. 

Invitation: Ruth Cooper, chair- 
man; Kathryn Hagner, Hester 
Thompson. 

Seating: Helen Hand, chairman- 

(Continued on Page 4) 

O 

100% TALKIE IS 

JUNIOR PLAY TREAT 

Following the big advertising pol 
icies of Warner Pictures Inc., Mctro- 
Goldwyn-Mayer, and their competi- 
tors, the Junior play cast gave a tan- 
talizing glimpse of one of the hum- 
orous situations in their play "His 
Private Secretary" at chapel Wednes- 
day morning. 

The students watching the perform- 
ance heartily enjoyed it. They were 
all set for the next peal of laughter 
when Earl Wolf stepped forth from 
his role and advised all to appear in 
the chapel on Saturday night to see 
the rest of the .play. 

As no advertising campaign if 
complete without its business man- 
ager, George Becker appeared on the 
stage and advertised the special fea- 
ture of the production— "100% talk- 
ing and 90% color." 



Lebanon Valley's basket-ball squad 
began intensive training this week foi 
the initial contest with Swarthmore 
to be played at 8 P.M. tomorrow even 
ing at the Annville High School. A 
lengthy practise was held in which 
defensive and offensive plays were 
drilled. Scrimmage also occupied a 
prominent part in the practise. 

The Blue and White is looking for- 
ward to the opening game with much 
interest for it is the first athletic con- 
test Between Swarthmore and Leba 
non Valley for several years. Th 
Quakers thus far this year have been 
unimpressive in their games, but the 
local tossers realize that the Quakers 
will put forth a supreme effort to win 
this game in order to redeem their 
orraer defeats. Lebanon Valley is 
just as anxious to win in order to get 
away to a flying start on their schc 
dule. 

Swarthmore has an advantage in 
the fact that they have played several 
games this season while this will be 
Lebanon Valley's opening. 

A veteran team will probably rep 
resent Lebanon Valley. The starting 
line-up is not known, for much de 
pends on the showing of certain in 
dividuals in this week's practises 
However, Heller will in all probabil 
ity be at center with Shroyer aJic 
Stewart at forwards and Capt. Al 
bright and Light at guards. Frey 
Bartlett, Warner, Fernsler, Sipe 
Thrush, Ulrich, Barnes, Morrison 
Nye, Orsino and Balsbaugh may also 
see action in the game. Coach Myhn 
has plenty of' good reserve material 
which will enable him to have a 
strong quintette on the floor at all 
times. 

Fourteen games have been sche 
dulcd by Manager Rhoades, with the 
possibility of one or two others be'ng 
added. 

O 



If you haven't, come down to 
Air. . Marsland's palatial residence 
at Pine Grove and take in the an- 
nual shoot of the Pine Grove Rod 
and Gun Club. 

Such a shoot offers diversified 
amusements but you cannot im- 
agine how ludicrous it is until 
'THE PRIVATE SECRETARY' 
makes his appearance on January 
ti at 8 P.M. in Engle Conserva- 
tory. 



CONDITION OF MRS. 
GOSSARD IMPROVES 

EMINENT SURGEON OF 
JOHNS HOPKINS 
OPERATES 



Mrs. George D. Gossard, wdio un- 
derwent an operation of the most se- 
rious nature on Tuesday, December 
17, is now slowly but surely recover- 
ing. The strides toward recovery 
which she has made are exceedingly 
satisfactory, considering the hazard- 
ous type of surgery necessary in her 
case. She has, however, improved to 
such an extent that a minor opera- 
tion which became necessary was 
successfully performed a few r days 
ago. 

Mrs. Gossard is a patient at the 
Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, 
and is under the personal care of Dr. 
Danby, one of the greatest brain- spe- 
ialists and svrgcons in the country. 
Both faculty and students w r ere 
glad to hear upon their return to the 
campus of Mrs. Gossard's improve- 
ment. They, furthermore, wish to 
extend to her their sincere wishes 
for her rapid recovery. 



PAGEANT DEPICTS 
CHRISTMAS STORY 

MUSIC ADDS BEAUTY 
TO COLORFUL 
SETTINGS 



The nativity of Christ, as depicted 
in the pageant-cantata "The Holy 
Host" presented on Thursday even- 
ing, December 19, 1929, was more 
successfully produced than anyone 
might have expected under the handi- 
caps which attended this feature of 
the college Christmas week. Mrs. 
Ruth Engle Bender was in charge ol 
the choral work, and Miss Anne Gor- 
don and Mr. Warren Burtner were 
the directors of the staging. 

A prelude played on the organ with 
depth of feeling by Miss Mildred 
Myers provided the touch of solemn- 
ity necessary for the scenes which 
followed. The pageant covered the 
period beginning with the visitation 
of the Angel Gabriel, who foretold 
the birth of Christ, and ended with 
the arrival of Mary and Joseph in 
Egypt with the Infant Jesus. 

Each of the numerous scenes were 
staged simply but impressively. The 
tableau effects in the pageant proved 
hat both directors and actors had 
evaluated accurately the dramatic ele- 
ments of the scenes. 

The cantata introduced into the 
pageant added not only variety but 
beauty in the good solo and chorus 
work of the singers. Miss Irene Pe- 
ter, as Mary, combined her dual 
role of singing and acting in a com- 
mendable manner. Mr. Edgar 
Shroyer, the Angel Gabriel, rather 

(Continued on Pa*« 4) 
Q 



-o- 



EX-FACULTY ARE 

LIBRARY DONORS 



FRENCH IS LANGUAGE 

OF BREAKFAST TABLE 



DOCTOR'S BROTHER 

GIVEN HIGH HONOR 



An innovation on the campus and 
in the Dining Hall is Madame 
Green's French breakfast table. The 
enthusiastic applicants for seats at 
this table were so numerous thai: it 
was necessary to divide them into I wo 
groups, alternat'ng every two we:ks 
The girls have learned that they vttre 
eating pommes de terre, toste et 
beurre, cereale and drinking ean and 
lait. As is usral with most groups 
where conversa'ion is at a premium 
the weather furnished a good subject. 
These French students are insuring 
themselves agairst starvation on their 
first trip to Pars. 



The faculty and students extendi 
l o Alfred C. Barnhart, a member! 

I of the senior class, their sincerestj 
sympathy upon the death of hlfj 
mother, Mrs. Edna Crone Barn- 
hart, on January 6, 1930. 



Our Carnegie library has recently 
been the recipient of two valuable 
collect'ons of books, one from the' 
library of the late Dr. Lehman and 
the other from Dr. Harold Bennett, 
a former member of the faculty ar.d 
now at Wisconsin University. 

The former is a most valuable con- 
trbution, consisting of seventy vol- 
umes. The list includes an almost 
complete file of the Bizarres and 
Quittapahillas published by the col- 
lege. The remainder is "made up of 
books on Astronomy, many of which 
are now out of print and consequent- 
ly invaluable in their lines; books on 
general Mathematics, and special 
treatises on elliptic functions, observ- 
ational geometry, and logarithms. 
The gift is in accord with the wish- 
es of Dr. Lehman, a former member 
of the Lebanon Valley faculty. 

The Bennett contribution consists 
of about thirty books, a miscellane- 
ous collection of French and German 
volumes. 



Dr. Paul A. W. Wallace has re- 
ceived word that his brother, Dr. Ed- 
ward W. Wallace, has been honored 
with the position of Chancellor of 
Victoria College, University of Tor- 
ort, Toronto, Canada. He was a 
graduate of the University of Tor- 
onto in 1904 majoring in the classics. 
In 1907 he received his B.D. degree. 

Dr. Edward Wallace went to China 
and spent many years there as a mis- 
sionary. Later he became professor 
of Education in the West China Un- 
ion University, in the city of Cheng- 
tu, near the border of Tibet. 

More recently Dr. Edward Wal- 
lace held the position of Secretary of 
the China Christian Education Asso- 
c : ation, in Shanghai. This associa- 
ton is attempting to correlate all 
Christian Universities in China. 

His hobbies are tennis, canoeing, 
mountains and being captured by ban- 
dits, he having had some very excit- 
ing and thrilling experiences with the 
latter. 

The upperclassmen will undoubted- 
ly recall Dr. Edward Wallace 
who visited here about two years 
the chapel exercises. 



PAGE TWO 



LA VIE COLLEGI ENNE, THURSDAY, JANUARY 9, 1930. 



ESTABLISHED 1925 



A weekly publication by the Under 
graduate Students of Lebanon 
Valley College 



EDITORIAL STAFF 

Esther Angstadt, '30 . . Editor-in-Chief 
Gladys Kriaub, '30 • • Associate Editor 
J. Calvin Keene, '30 . . Associate Editor 
C. Alfred Shenk, '30 . Managing Editor 

IfcEFORTOBXA.il STAFF 

Grace Keener, '30 

Warren E. Burtner, '30 

Ruth Shroyer, '32 

Russell Morgan, '31 

Rbt. L. Raudabush, '31 

General Reporters 
Alcesta Slichter. '30 .... Conservatory 

A. Edgar Shroyer, '30 Athletics 

Hilda Hess. '30 Clionian 

Hilda Buckley, '32 Delphian 

Philip Barnes, '31 Kalozetean 

Robert liawhouser, '32 . Philokosmian 
Edna Early, '31 .... Alumni Reporter 



BUSINESS STAFF 

John Snyder, '30 ... Business Manager 
Alexander Grant. '31 

Assistant Business Manager 

William J. Myers. '30 

Circulation Manager 



FACULTY ADVISORS 

Dr. Paul A. W. Wallace, English Dept 
Miss Mary K. Wallace, English Dept 
Dr. Paul S. Wagner. Math. Dept 



LA "V IE COLLEGIENNE, a membe 
of the Intercollegiate Newspaper Asso 
ciation of the Middle Atlantic States. 



Single Copies 10 cents 

Subscription $1.50 per year 

Entered at the Annville, Pa., post- 
office as second class matter under the 
Act of March 3, 1879. 



A NEW YEAR— WHAT? 

Time, in her journey, has turned 
another page and has presented u 
with a new sheet. We have passed 
through another of her doorways and 
as we return to school, we find our 
selves facing a new year of opportuni 
ties and promises. Most of us in our 
correspondence have had to change 
"29's" to "30's" several times at least 

Looking back for a moment we see 
a year of history that held for each 
some sorrows and disappointments 
but also many joys and successes. All 
of us, as students, find ourselves bet 
ter prepared and with a larger fund 
of experiences for the larger work ol 
service for which we are preparin 
But let us forget the past year. As 
Paul said, "Forgetting the things 
which are behind, we press forward" 

Looking forward into the future we 
sometimes wish we could disce 
.what it shall bring forth. Many ol 
us will finish our college careers 
others will be just getting into the 
swing of collegiate life. Perhaps some 
will have stepped over the border and 
come face to face with the great ad 
venture. In any case, it remains for 
each of us to resolve to make the 
most of our opportunities and to re- 
member in the midst of our rathei 
gay life here that there is a graver 
side to existence. 

"Build thee more stately mansions, 

O my soul, 
As the swift seasons roll! 
Leave thy low vaulted past! 
Let each new temple, nobler than 

the last, 

Shut thee from heaven with a dome 

more vast, 
Till thou at length are free, 
Leaving thine outgrown shell by 

life's unresting sea!" 

TO THE ALUMNI OF '30 

AND PREDECESSORS 



What senior has returned to the 
campus this week without realizing 
that he is now on the last lap of his 
college career? It has been the 
thought disturbing the complacency 
of most of us, for with this fact to 
face comes the ever recurring ques- 
tion to seniors, "After graduation, 
WHAT?" We are, of course, think- 
ing of the great world that is wait- 
ing for US, thinking in our own self- 
centered, secretive way that seniors 
have gone out before us, but WE 
have never gone out — what a privi- 
lege will be accorded the world. 

On whose payroll our name will 
be written next year is now a prob- 



lem to the seniors. However, while 
we are still a united group on the 
campus we can plan to be influential 
alumni. Does not the prestige of the 
degree which we shall carry out into 
the world depend entirely upon the 
reputation of our Alma Mater? At- 
tending college here or anywhere is 
an investment of money. Invest- 
ments are always expected to bring 
back the principal plus high interest. 
If our college should cease to exist 
in the next two or three years — using 
this by way of example — just what 
would our investment, as evidenced 
in our degree, be worth to us? 
NOTHING. 

Do we, as the next group of alum- 
ni to go forth, realize the power we 
might exert for the good of our Alma 
Mater together with the vast army ot 
them already in the world? We, as 
our predecessors for many years per- 
haps, joke about the "alumni gymna- 
sium." Next year we will be the 
alumni portion of that joke — if we 
are content to live complacently 111 
our niches and feel the old fervor for 
our Alma Mater only at an occasional 
gridiron battle. 

The alumni, the full-fledged invest- 
ors in college, should ever be on the 
alert as to the standards of their Al- 
ma Mater. They have a right to this 
as a dividend on their investment. In 
order that their investment may not 
depreciate in the stock market of the 
world, they have a right and should 
help to see to it that their college 
progresses along with her rival in- 
stitutions, and should even outstep 
the pace taken by rivals. Why 
should not fair-minded, progressive 
alumni be representatives of the army 
behind them on pertinent questions 
arising on the campus. Some plan 
based on this idea might be worked 
out by the alumni who would meet 
two or three times a year and discuss 
the manner in which affairs are car- 
ried on at their Alma Mater. Afe 
not the alumni the intellectual off- 
spring of the Alma Mater, and as 
such, have they not some inherent 
right to observe, criticise and help to 
improve the conditions of the Alma 
Mater for the progeny? 

We as the next alumni should 
leave this school not thinking glumly 
that now we are "back numbers", but 
that now is come the greatest oppor- 
tunity of all — the exertion of sincere 
efforts to make the alumni really 
count in the existence of our college. 

Sinclair Lewis, in a magazine arti- 
cle, has dubbed the alumni as "Killers 
of Thought." He shows us the alum- 
ni at the universities as building the 
mammoth stadii and ruling their 
Almae Matres to such an extent that 
the best football brawn in the coun- 
try is purchased at fabulous prices 
for the autumn contests in the arenas 
all done under an autocratic alum 
The only power left the faculty 
is to decide, as Sinclair pictures it, 
whether a course shall receive 2 3/4 
or 2 7/8 credits, and similar absurd 
tasks. This, of course, is an exag- 
gerated picture. Yet, we may learn 
our lesson from these active groups 
of alumni. We, too can help to give 
prestige to our college, whether it 
be athletically or scholastically. It 
is our mission as alumni. 



r 



We Pay Tribute To- 




DR. PAUL WAGNER 



Really keen, creative, analytical 
minds are very rare and when found 
usually are com,bined with a mental 
torpitude for all other matters except 
the one which forms the individual's 
sole interest in life. But in Dr. Wag- 
ner we have that rare combination 
of a Tmind keen in its natural line, 
which is Mathematics, and keen also 
for and in all other things which it 
encounters. 

In his department he is a master 
and undoubtedly ranks high among 
the mathematicians of the country. 
He is one of the few professors who 
can do the seemingly impossible task 
of making students do constructive, 
original thinking of their own. It is 
a paradox but nevertheless true, and 
shows the hold he has upon his stu- 
dents, that altho he never takes the 




roll in his classes, they arc cut prob- 
bly the fewest number of times of 
any course in the curriculum. 

Besides his many duties as a pro- 
fessor, he is acting as assistant to 
President Gossard and does an im- 
mense amount of work in that ca- 
pacity. He would scarcely need a 
card index for his mind has all the 
facts of his job neatly tiled away for 
instant reference. 

But Dr. Wagner is more than a 
professor: he is one with the stu- 
dents and is welcomed as such by 
them, Here there is no officious dig- 
nity or felling of superiority over 
undergraduates. He hears the trou- 
bles, problems and impossible ideas 
of an unbelievably large number of 
students and is always ready with 
excellent common sence and advice to 
help over seemingly insurmountable 
difficulties. He is the go-between 
standing between the faculty and the 
students. An individual wdio would 
not think of talking a matter over 
with a professor does not hesitate to 
talk freely t him. 

He is the business man of the fac- 
ulty advisors on the LA VIE staff. 
He watches over the finances of the 
paper and sees that all goes well in 
this important department of the 
periodical. 

One of the big things Lebanon 
Valley does for a student is to bring 
him in contact with a man of char- 
acter such as Professor Wagner is 
and to give him this example to 
(hold before h'.m for all his future life. 



Miss Louise Fensil, the phy s j Ca ] 
education instructress, spent several 
days of the recent Christmas V aca 
tion at Hartford, Connecticut, v : " * 
ing friends. She returned to An 
vi lie Sunday evening, January ^ 

Miss Mary K. Wallace passed the 
greater part of her vacation in Dp 
troit, Michigan, at the home of he 
sister. She returned to Annvifl 
Sunday evening, after having spent 
the last few days in New York visit 
ing friends. 



Professor M. L. Stokes journeyed 
t Toronto, Canada, for the Christ- 
mas vacation to spend the Christmas 
holidays in his home town. 



Professor Alexander Crawford had 
an enjoyable vacation in Philadelphia 
over the holidays. 



BEYOND THE CAMPUS 



PEACE PIPE FOR NATIONS 



DYER '29 ENGAGED 

TO FELLOW STUDENT 



Friends and acquaintances of Rus- 
cll Oyer of the class of iq?q will be 
pleased to learn that his engagement 
to Miss Mary Jackson, of Dayton 
Ohio, lias been announced. Mr. ( >yei 
is at present a student at Ronebrake 
Theological Seminary, as is also Miss 
Jackson. 



The war between Russia and 
China in Manchuria has come to an 
end, temporarily at least. The trou- 
ble began last July 10 when the 
Ch inese arided Russian consulates in 
Manchuria and said they discovered 
evidences of Communistic propaganda 
.being spread there. As a result they 
expelled 100 officials of the Chinese 
Eastern Railway. Russia protested to 
no effect so she seized the railway. 
The war was on. By the terms of the 
protocol now in effect,' Russia returns 
the railroad to China and China in 
her turn restores the consulates. On 
January 25 a conference is being held 
in Moscow to make the final settle- 
ment. 



UNIVERSAL DEAFNESS 



Professor Donald Fields traveled to 
Irs horrae where he remained for the 
Y-uletide vacation. 



Miss Helen Meyers, librarian, en- 
joyed the Christmas and New Year 
at her home at Mt. Joy, Penna. 



Madame Greene had a most delight- 
ful week at Atlantic City during the 
recent holidays. 

Prof, and Mrs. Wagner have re- 
cently moved their family into their 
beautiful new home on College ave- 
nue. Prof. Wagner personally super- 
vised the extensive alterations in the 
house which resulted in a most com- 
fortably and attractively planned 
home. 

O 

LOST! A RELATIVE 

Now we learn that the ape has no 



Thomas Edison predicts that noisy 

cities will eventually deafen all theii , 

. , . i-\ t"» t? J p'ace in the branches of our family 
their citizens permanently. Dr. E. L. r ^ TT ^ , 

Free supplements this pleasant pre- 
diction by telling us that people are 
now deafened one-third to one-half 



by noises on the street. He has dis- 
covered that three-fifths of this noise 
is due to trucks, one-fifth to street 
cars and the remaining fifth to var- 
ious and incidental sources. As a par- 
tial remedy to cut the amount of 
noise in half, he suggests frequent 
servicing and oiling of cars and 
trucks. 



trees. Professor Henry Osborn, 
I President of the American Society of 
Natural History, draws human an- 
cestry back for twenty million years. 
He says that the human characteris- 
tics were plainly visible as far back 
as the Pliacene epoch. Before that 
time he does not commit himself, al- 
tho he does say there are but two 
general opinions possible. These are 
that either man descended from some 
form of animal or is the result of 
some special creation. 



Q- 

FIRST SMOKER HONORED 



The first man to smoke in Europe 
is being honored by a tablet which is 
being erected by the Spanish Tobacco 
Monopoly in his home town. This 
historic personage was Rodrligo de 
Jerez by name. He accompanied 
Columbus on his first voyage to the 
New World and there learned to 
smoke from the Indians. It was re- 
ported by people who saw him smoke 
that smoke issued from his nose and 
eyes. The Inquisition made an in- 
vestigation to discover if he were in 
league with the Devil, but as there 
is no record of his being punished, 
it is safe to assume that he was ac- 
quitted. The association, erecting 
the ■memorial, is doing So out G f grat . 
itude to the man who made their in- 
dustry possible. We wonder if he 
were trying to maintain his slender 
figure. 



E. J. SNAVELY AND COMPANY 

UMBRELLAS, LUGGAGE and SPORTING GOODS 
ATHLETIC EQUIPMENT 
628 Cumberland St. 
LEBANON. PENNA. 



CLOTHING OF QUALITY 

J S BASEHORE 



Lebanon, Pa. 



KREAMER BROS. 



STEINITE RADIOS 
EASY ELECTRIC WASHE R 

COLUMBIA GAS STOVES AND RANGES 
RUGS AND LINOLEUMS 

"House of Better Values" 
FURNITURE AND UNDERTAKING 

328 W. Mam St. Phone 6R3 



Annville, Pa- 



—Shaeffer's Lifetime Pens — 

NONE BETTER ABSOLUTELY GUARANTEED 

AN EVERYDAY NECESSITY FOR 
COLLEGE STUDENTS 

T_I A T> DFT *C ^ e Store of Lebanon 

HARrLL 5> 757-759 Cumberland Street 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, JANUARY 9, 1930. 



PAGE THREE 




'A COLLEGE JOKE TO CURE THE 'BLUES'" 

— Jonathan Swift. 



DORM OVERHAULED 

DURING HOLIDAYS 



A LINE FROM A. CORN 

Dear Joe Dawgone: 

While I'm at home recuperating for a New Year, 1 
thought I'd write you a few lines. You know it's an awful idea to be poor 
and especially forgetful, but it seems I'm) lots of both (therefore I'm quali- 
fied for a position as college professor and also for my Ph.D). But I've 
been reminded by greetings from some of my old college friends that a 
Merry Xmas has gone and a Happy New Year is here. Those pesky squir- 
rels I mentioned something about in the fall got at my money bag ana 
chewed up all of my two cent pieces (nuts weren't so plentiful this fall) so 
that I had no money to send greetings. At any rate, I'm going to ask you 
to deliver my message. Of course, since the "big holidays" are over, 1 
(won't mention them, but to the faculty and all my friends — both at L. V. 
and away from the old school — I wish a warm and joyful May Day and a 
jester with lots of new tricks. 

I trust that this will partly overcome my most unfortunate circum- 
stance. I | 

Just another spasm from a dying, 
j .| i , A. CORN. 

P. S. — Don't tell nobody — but school out here ain't so hot, — you have 
to study too hard. Again, 

Yours for more nuts to help save the 

A. CORN. 

—LVC— 

GREAT MEN ARE LIKE THIS 

"Bones" returns to campus with forehead battered up. LA VIE reporter, 
on look-out for "scoop", interviews "Bones", but the latter like all wise men 
tells news-sniffer nothing. But reporters are mind readers. "Bones" fell. 

— LVC — 

TELESCOPIC OBSERVATIONS OF MR. DAWGONE 

8:io A. M. any rweek-day — Madeline Sheddy seen sprinting across the 
campus to her early classes. 

Jan. 6, 1:30 P. M. — Anne Kiehl, Mary K. Goshert and Hester Thompson 
exchanging kisses in the middle of the campus as the first step in their post- 
holiday reunion. 

At Dinner, Jan. 6 — Mike Toronto looks for Mary Ellen Witmer in vain. 
At Supper, Jan. 6 — Paul Emenheiser and Fred Mund are "necking" each 
other as they enter dining room. (Read Chapter in Woodbury on 
"Habit".) 

Jan. 6, 7:00 P. M. — Couples return to library to begin school year right. 
Twenty-nine ex-neophytes hunting for something new to rave about now 
practice teaching is over. 
'Cal" Keene was in Annville "on and off" during the holidays, and so 
Wa s Dot Hiester. Bruce Behney completed the triangle by spending some 
time here "off and on.'' Apparently the swains managed matters very effi- 
ciently, Cal being "on" when Bruce was "off" and vice versa. 

— LVC— 

Beatty of '29 has had a difficult time getting Gladys to accept his pic- 
Ure s. Some she has burned in the rear of North Hall, to others she has adcl- 
S mou staches, and on one occasion even measles. At Xmas Jack brought 
picture. Gladys describes it as "pretty and it flatters." 

— LVC— 
SENSATIONAL! 
Prof. Wagner: What do you do when you concentrate? 
Reekie Keller: When 1 concentrate, 1 don't know what I'm doing. 
Prof. Wagner: Miss Keller, the commlon term for that is "unconscious." 

— LVC— 

AUTHENTIC SOURCES 

. (In Eng. 66)— Dr. Wfeilla'ce: Where did Shakespeare find his sources 
f0r "As You Like It"? 

B »b Eshleman: In Rosalynde's Lodge. (Slightly confused)— Er-ah, 1 
ea n Lodge's "Rosalynde". 
t Dr - Wallace: Well, how did Shakesepare's "Forest of Arden" diffei 

0rn Lodge's? What was there startling in his Forest of Arden? 
the leman (»i° r c confused than ever): Why, er-ah, there was a lion 



that 



Sh c: 



-LVC- 
AWK WARD— RATHER ! 

You know, Trula, some pcple around here are rather "goofey' 



rp, - ^ m «uuv«, J-lLlicl, ."iUlllC I* 1 v k*» w ' ■ ^ * — 

rul a (piping up innocently) — Oh, docs "goofey" mean in love? 



During the absence of the students 
from their dormitory homes, Santa 
Clause seized the golden opportunity 
and made some renovations. In ad- 
dition to various minor improve- 
ments, the North Hall girls were de- 
lighted to find that many of the win- 
dows had been weather stripped. 

The rooms facing the north and 
west sides have been frequently too 
cold for comfort during a windy sea- 
son. Now these same rooms are 
even free from the usual creaking of* 
windows, since the weather stripping 
has been placed in use. 

O 

FIRST CLASS OF 

NEOPHYTES RETIRE 



Another group of neophytes have 
made their exit from the Annville 
High School building. The largest 
number, ever practise ( teaching in 
the same semester, plodded their way 
faithfully to the high school, but now 
"its gone" and some persons are hop- 
ing that "it will not be for gotten." 

This is the first year that the stu- 
dent teachers observed thirty times 
before teaching and hence were re- 
quired t observe only five days after 
the twenty days of teaching. Credits 
were given for attendance at the 
County Institute in Lebanon, which 
accounted for the remaining five of 
the forty observations. 

With the completion of this task, 
the prospective teachers feel quite a 
burden lifted from their shoulders, 
and at the same time struggle to en- 
courage the next class of neophytes. 

O 

MISS JOHNSON IS 

HOLIDAY HOSTESS 



At a charming bridge tea held in 
her cozy and attractive apartment, 
Miss Stella Johnson entertained a 
number of the wives of faculty mem- 
bers on Thursday afternoon, Janu- 
ary 2, 1930. 

The rooms were decorated in a 
very clever and pretty manner, which 
gave a delightful atmosphere to the 
occasion. There were three tables of 
bridge. The hostess awarded three 
beautiful prizes to a fortunate trio 
Delicious refreshments were served 
to the guests. To make the repast 
different from others, Miss Johnson 
contrived a very pretty effect by us- 
ing three color schemes of china on 
her tables. Orange and black, yel- 
low and white, and pink were the 
colors used. 

The affair was very successful and 
the guests enjoyed a most pleasant 
afternoon. 

O 



XMAS WEEK CLOSES 

WITH EARLY SERVICE 



As an appropriate ending to the 
festivities of Christmas week on the 
campus, the "Y" associations of Leb- 
anon Valley College conducted a 
candle liight service in the chapel on 
Friday, December 20, at 6:30 A.M. A 
large triangle was placed on the stage 
and was decorated with candles. 
These furnished the only light for the 
meeting. 

Miss Ruth Cooper was in charge. 
After a double quartet had rendered 
several Christmas carols, Miss Cooper 
read an appro riate selection. This 
was followed by a song and then 
by a vocal solo by Alcesta Slichter. 

John Snyder led in prayer, follow- 
ing which Grace Keener read a 
Christmas poem. 

The group joined in singing Christ- 
mas hymns as a finale to the service. 



HAS OUR MODERN 

EDUCATION FLAWS? 

By Samuel O. Grim/n, Professor 
Of Physics and 
Mathematics 

Every student must constantly face 
the inquiry as to what knowledge is 
worth most. He manifestly cannot 
any longer encompass the entire field 
of human knowledge. His time does 
not permit him to pursue this an- 
cient ideal a great way. Facing this 
impossible situation he decides what 
knowledge he believes t have the 
most worth and specialization is his 
answer to the perplexing riddle. He 
is impelled by prospects of the future 
to confine his attention to that which 
he chooses to call the practical. Ed- 
ucational administrators often encour- 
age him in this ideal. Our whole ed- 
ucational program has been so per- 
meated by this so-called practical 
goal that we sympathize with Presi- 
dent Rightmire of the Ohio State 
Jniversity when he wonders "wheth- 
er we have been right in shifting the 
aim t the practical, and making- cul- 
ture, if it is in the scheme at all, a 
by-product." We also confess a com- 
miunity of interest is not only to 
learn t make a living but to "make 
living worth while." 

Applying the yard stick of reputed 
practical value to the materials of ed- 
ucation, educators have consistently 
favored a reduction in the amount of 
most subject matter to be taught in 
our schools. Sometime ago there was 
featured in the public press an article 
which said that educators had dem- 
onstrated that eighty-five per cent of 
the arithmetic now taught in our/ 
schools is superfluous. In this con- 
nection we note that Prof. Brigham, 
of Colgate University, has said "We 
should not worry too much about 
tendencies or about the Professors of 
education. Pendulums have a way of 
swinging back. Make education a 
sweet dream and the hard .facts of 
the universe will drive us back to dis- 
cipline." 

Culture has been fittingsly de- 
scribed as the refining of the mental 
and moral life. That this is still a 
very serious objective in modern edu- 
cation cannot well be denied. And 
the twentieth century is not a very 
favorable time to deny the spiritual 
when "even a whisper may be heard 
around the world." These elements, 
discipline, culture, and spirit used to 
be carried by Lauguage History, 
Mathematics, Geography, Astronomy. 
Geology and Natural Philosophy. 
Now Georgraphy has been abbreviat- 
ed, and Astronomy and Geology al- 
most entirely neglected. Language is 
being discounted and Mathematics 
discipline, culture, and spirit, used to 
Philosophy has evoloved our present 
series of kindred Physical Sciences. 
It has been said that "the cultivated 
man knows his relation to nature, ap- 
preciates its beauty and grandseur and 
bows before its mystery." In earlier 
years we looked to Astronomy and 
Geology for aid along these lines: 
Now few study Astronomy and fewer 
still take the trouble to investigate 
the lessons taught by Geology. In 
collegiate education training of the 
time sense is carried on by the sci- 
ences, language and history. History 
and language give training only for 
past experience. Geology and Astron- 
omy contribute to the same end. In 
the lessons of modern Biology, Chem- 
istry and Physics are to be found aids 
for worth while living and useful im- 
plications for the future. As we here 
deal with the problem of time so we 
also face a new interpretation of 
space and gravitation. None can 
afford to lose contact with these 
modern developments in fundamental 
ideas. No amount of extra-curricu- 



lum activities will aid in establishing 
these contacts. Only the time-honor- 
ed method of self-discipline of mind 
and body can promote them. Real 
education is not a "sweet dream", 
and never will be. In building a col- 
lege curriculum, the student ought 
to bear in mind the value of the pos- 
session of a large number of funda- 
mental ideas in the several fields of 
human knowledge. A super-structure 
of specialization can then be built, 
most successfully on a broad founda- 
tion of discipline and culture. 

O 

SENIORS RETARD 

QUITTIE PROGRESS 



The Business Manager and Editor 
of the 1931 Quittapahilla spent De- 
cember 21st with Mr. Painter of the 
Williamsport Printing Company. 
Final plans were drawn up for the 
volume, which plans included sev- 
eral new features It is the opinion 
of the staff that this Quittie will be 
the best ever published. It is an- 
nounced with regret that the procras- 
tination of several of the cap and 
gown wearers is holding up a few 
panels, but from present indications, 
this difficulty will be soon eliminated. 

ROUTINE OF CHAPEL 

DEVOTIONS CHANGED 



Seeing the need for a change in the 
chapel program, the faculty has 
changed the proceedings of the morn- 
ing worship service in order to 
break up the monotony of the former 
routine. 

Instead of singing the hymn "Holy, 
Holy, Holy," as the first selection in 
the devotions the student body rises 
and sings the Doxology which is a 
fitting substitute. Professor Craw- 
ford has assumed the responsibility 
of leading the students, and under his 
guidance it is hoped to develop the 
singing of the student body. Now 
and then special features will be put 
on to add interest to the program. 

O 

CO-EDS ENTERTAIN 

AT BIRTHDAY DINNER 



Misses Anne Gordon and Mildred 
Saylor were guests of honor at t 
birthday dinner given for them on, 
Wednesday evening in the dining- 
room. A table had been attractively 
decorated in pink and white for the 
party and a birthday cake placed at 
either end. The guests included 
Misses Margaret Smyser, Dorothy 
Hiester, Helen Hain, Leah Miller. 
Mary Ax and Helen Kauffman. 

O 

KING OF ZEPS 

The Goodyear-Zeppelin Corporation 
of Akron, Ohio, is building a new 
dirigible that will dwarf in size 
anything we now have in that 
line. The building that will hold 
the new Zeppelin has been complet- 
ed just recently and the airship will 
be built within it. The building it- 
self covers over 81/2 acres and is 
large enough to have eight football 
games played in it at the same time. 
The ship which will be christened the 
ZRS-4, will be larger than the Los 
Angeles and the Graf Zeppelin com- 
bined. Its capacity will be 15 million 
cubic feet, which is six times that of 
the Los Angeles. 



COLLEGE CALENDAR 

Friday, Jan. 10 — Literary Society 
Meetings. Basketball game — 
L. V. C. vs. Swarthmore at 
home. 

Saturday, Jan. ir — Junior Play in 
Engle Hall at 8 o'clock. 

Sunday, Jan. 12— Y. M. & Y. W. 
Meetings. 

Tuesday, Jan. 14 — Harrisburg Con- 
cert — Myra Hess and Harold 
Bauer in two piano rec'.tal. 

Friday, Jan. 17 — Basket-ball game, 
L. V. vs. Susquehanna, at home. 



PAGE FOUR 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, JANUARY 9, 19m 



PAGEANT DEPICTS 

CHRISTMAS STORY 

(Continued from Page i) 



surprised the audience with his fine 
handling of his solos. Although Mr. 
Calvin Keene, as Joseph, had a small 
part, he executed the same with his 
characteristic aptitude. The chant of 
the liturgist, sung hy Mr. Earl Wolf 
who substituted at the last minute 
for Mr. Luther Rearick, with re- 
sponses by the girls' chorus, was one 
of the most delightful group num- 
bers. The Three Wise Men in their 
trio likewise contributed much to the 
beauty of the cantata. The many 
choruses sung by a group of girls in 
the roles of angels added their share 
to the musical success by their fine 
rendition. 

The directors deserve much credit 
for the manner in which they fused 
together the two distinct elements of 
music and drama in this pageant so 
that the whole group of scenes moved 
on as a distinct unit of performance. 

The annual Christmas pageant is 
sponsored by the "Y" organizations 
on the campus. Not only is it a tra- 
dition here, but it is one of the events 
which make the week prior to the 
Christmas recess the most enjoyable 
of the whole year. 

— O 

DELPHIAN WORKS ON 

ANNIVERSARY PLANS 

(Continued from Page i) 



L Y 15 YEARS AGO 



OUR 50TH ANNIVERSARY 



Anna Wolf, Edith Fields. Dorothy 
Slater. 

Decorating: Eva Peck, chairman; 
Margaret Young, Elizabeth Lefever 
Helen Peterson, Marie Gelwicks. 

Refreshment: Mary Axe, chair- 
man; Mary Snyder, Mary Bixler 
Pearl March, Ruth Liller. 

Music: Dorothy Heister, chair- 
man; Mary K. Goshert, Luella Heil 
man. 

Demolishing: Grace Keener, pre 
siding chairman; Dorothy Forry, ac 
tive chairman; Helen Franklin, Mar- 
ion Kruger, Ann Gohn, Mary Eliza- 
beth. Stevens, Harriet Miller, Trula 
Kok. 

O 

HEAT TURNED OFF 

TO MAKE REPAIRS 



Usually, when we think of some- 
thing getting older we think of it be- 
coming more useless, but not so with 
our L. V. C. 

Just a little more than 15 years ago 
Lebanon Valley held the opening ex- 
ercises to start its fiftieth year of 
service. The program opened with 
the singing of the school songs by the 
students. The devotional exercises 
by Rev. B. F. Daugherty followed 
and then the speaker of the day, Dr. 
J. L. Hynson, delivered his address. 

The gist of his address showed that 
the greatness of a college consists in 
coupling its equipment with a whole- 
hearted energy and devotion. There 
is not a nation which doesn't glory 
in its past achievements, nor is there 
any institution worthy of mention 
which does not place before the pub- 
lic its principles, achievements, and 
its future prospects. L. V. is no ex- 
ception to this rule. Her past history 
has been glorious and doubtlessh 
she will continue to grow and Will 
become greater in the future. 

From "College News." 
O 



Many of the curious no doubt 
would like to know why the heat was 
turned off on Monday night, January 
6. A nipple in the twelve inch steam 
line at the east end of the Men's Dor 
mitory blew out of the main and it 
was necessary to turn off the steam so 
that repairs could be made. The 
necessary repairs have been made and 
reports from the power house indicate 
that everything is in first class order 
again. 



O- 



ALUIINUS, TEACHER IN 

HUMMELSTOWN, DIES 



L L, V- 10 YEARS AGO 

PENNED BY A CAMPUS 

POET OF PAST DECADE 




It's fine to dream of triumph when 

Success shall crown you king, 
It's fine to dream of sweet content 

when Fortune's bells shall ring, 
It's fine to dream of laden store 

where want shall never lurk, 
But it's finer still to roll your sleeves 

and start right in to work. 

It's fine to dream of victory with 
struggle fought and won, 

It's fine to dream of Future Fame 
when all of life is done, 

It's fine to dream of lofty he : ghts at- 
tained by sweat of brow, 

But it's finer still to meet the world 
and launch your struggle now. 

It's fine to dream of Happiness and 

Joy serene and pure, 
It's fine to dream of Love and Homt 

and all that shall endure, 
It's fine to dream in the West of life 

of a golden scene and blue, 
But it's finer still to buckle in and 

make your dreams come true. 

From "College News." 



TEAMS PREPARE FOR 

FORENSIC CONTESTS 



(Continued from Page 1) 

body should offer to debating teams 
the same support and goodwill ac- 
corded t their athletic teams. In the 
past the support here has been any- 
thing but complimentary, either to 
the visiting teams or the home teams. 
It is not too late to make a New 
Year's resolution that in future de- 
bating teams representing the col- 
lege shall not want for support. Sure- 
ly it is not too much to expect that 
since the debaters put in long hours 
in reading and preparing their argu- 
ments, the student body should turn 
out and wholeheartedly support the 
teams that are upholding the honor 
of their Alma Mater. 



PRINTING 



CANDLE SERVICE IS 

XMAS INSPIRATION 



The college has lost another alum 
nus, Mr. Conrad Curry, througl 
death. Mr. Curry was graduate 
from here with the class of 1916. H 
was engaged as a merchant from his 
graduation until 1923 when he be- 
gan teaching in the high school of 
Hummelstown, Pa. He was still a 
member of that faculty at the time 
of his death on December 12, 1929 
He is survived by his wife and two 
children, a son and a daughter. 



The annual candlelight service of 
the United Brethren Church was held 
Sunday evening, December 22. The 
church was beautifully decorated 
with white candles and evergreens 
creating an inspiring Christmas at- 
mosphere. 

As a prelude, the Tower Chimes 
played several of the traditiona 
Christmas carols, while the cho:i 
sang from the tower. After a quartet 
of brass instruments playing "Hark! 
the Herald Angels Sing," the choir 
entered the auditorium singing "O 
Come, All Ye Faithful" The program 
was made up of Christmas music, and 
a Yuletide message by the pastor. 
Dr. I. Owen Jones. Solo parts were 
taken by Mrs. Edith Frantz Mills* 
Miss Miriam Oyer, Messrs. Allen 
Walter, David Shroyer, and Edgar 
Shroyer. Some of the numbers used 
were "The Birthday of a King" 
(Neidlinger,) "O Holy Night" 
Adams,) and Handel's "Hallelujah 
Chorus." 

The choir, under the direction of 
Miss Anna Kreider, showed careful 
training and fineness of shading ef- 
fects. Miss Violet Walter, at the or- 
gan, added much toward making the 
service a success. 



When you want work 
of the better kind see 

HIESTER-The Printer 



PIANOS 

PLAYER PIANOS 

PLAYER ROLLS 
VICTOR RADIOS 

VICTROLAS 

VICTOR RECORDS 
SHEET MUSIC 

Miller Music Store 

738 Cumberland Street 
Lebanon, Pa. 



Fine assortment of Watches, Rings : 

Chains, & etc. 
New Century Chiming Grandfather 
Clock3 

LIGHT'S JEWELRY STORE 
51 West Main St. 



CHRISTMAS SPECIALS 



10% off on all Felt goods, including 
PENNANTS, BANNERS, PILLOW 
TOPS, Etc. 
15% off on all College Jewelry 
This sale includes Fraterity Pins and 
L. V. C. — Except Crown Set 



COLLEGE BOOK STORE 



-O- 



FORMER MEMBER OF 

FACULTY GUEST HERE 



On Friday evening, December 26 
Mrs. Andrew Bender entertained a 4 
a dinner party at her home Miss May- 
hells Adams, Head of the School of 
Expression at the Alma School for 
Girls, Canada, Miss Eve Adams, Mrs. 
Mary C. Greene, and Miss Yvonne 
Green. As usual, Mrs. Bender proved 
herself to be a charming hostess, and 
the guests spent a most enjoyable 
evening. Miss Maybelle Adams is a 
former member of the L. V. faculty 



ft 



/ 



NO 
USED 



OPTICAL 

-TT>t. E 




We offer 67 dis- 
tinct styles in 
glasses. The newest 
'n white gold, yellow 
gold, shell and rim- 
less. 




CHEFS 
HOUSE OF GOOD 
FOOD 



DICTIONARIES 

English, French, Italian, German 
Latin, Spanish — 

All kinds at all prices 
From small pocket to large un- 
abridged. 

Come and see them. 

BOLLMANS 

33 South Eighth Street, 
Lebanon, Pa. 



D. RUSSO 

LOOK LOW PRICES LOOK 

Men's Half Soles 

& Heeels $1.5° 

Men's Half Soles $1.00 

Ladies Half Soles & 

Rubber Heels $1.15 

Ladis Half Soles 80c. With 

Top Life $1.05 

Ladies Rubber Heels 

35c. Top Lift 25c 

9 E MAIN ST. 
CENTRAL SHOE REPAIRING 
SHOP 



Wm. Penn Highway 



Near Annville 



Meals Served at All Hours 
BANQUETS AND PARTIES 
Our Specialty 



D. L SAYLOR & SONS 

Contractors 

LUMBER AND COAL 



ANNVILLE. PA. 



PATRONIZE 
L'A VIE 
ADVERTISERS 



HW MILLER 

HARDWARE 
OF QUALITY 



Annville 



Pa. 



PHOTOGRAPHS 

LIVE FOREVER 

URLICH'S STUDIO 

820 Cumberland St. 



PRINTING 




PUBLICATION, 
BOOKS, CATA- 
LOGUES, STATION- 
ERY, CARDS, TAGS, 

ANNVILLE PRINTING 
COMPANY 

ANNVILLE PA. 



RUSSEL and SPANGLER 

Our Agents At 
LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 
FINKELSTEIN 
Cleaners & Dyers 



TRY OUR HOME MADE 
SANDWICHES 

QUALITY LUNCH 

BREYER'S ICE CREAM 
A Specialty 



1 7 E. Main St. 



Annville, Pa. 



F. W. GERBERICH'S STORE 

FRESH GROCERIES, 
SODAS and ICE CREAM 



29 Sheridan Ave., Annville, Pa. 

For Quality 

Baked Products 

Patronize 

FINK'S BAKERY 

Main Street 



For 

QUALITY PLUS 

in 

Material and Workmanship 
Repairs at Special R ateS 
Go To 

ANNVILLE SHOEMAN 

207 W. Main 



DON'T FORGE T! WE SELL 
WHITMAN'S CHOCOLATES 

THE PENNWAY 

opposite p. o. 
A FULL LIN! 7 . OF FRESH PASTRY DAILY 



GIVE BOYS A 
•BREAK"! SUSQUEHANNA 
vs. L. V. JAN. 17 



Mit €oll<$ieiiw 

LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



SUCCESS TO THE 
CO-EDS AT JUNIATA 
IN CAGE OPENING 



VOLUME V 



ANNVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA, THURSDAY, JANUARY 16, 1930. 



No. 13. 



QUAKERS SWEEP L V 
TO 37-24 DEFEAT 



VISITORS FORM IRON 
OFFENSE FOR 
LOCAL FOE 



FIRST Y. W. PROGRAM 

OF YEAR "BROADCAST" 



Lebanon Valley received a rude 
jolt in the opening game of die sea- 
son when Swarthinore handed the 
locals a 37-24 setback. The Garnet 
with the greatest offense they have 
displayed this year, completely swept 
the Blue and White off their feet the 
second half to annex a comfortable 
victory- 

The first half was closely contest- 
ed and ended in a 12-12 deadlock. 
Swarthmore rolled up a big lead in 
the beginniig of the second half and 
was never headed. The closest Leb- 
anon Valley approached tying Swarth- 
more in the second half was when 
Stewart sank three field goals and a 
foul in quick succession to cut 
Swarthmore's lead to 2 points: 21-19. 
That was the last serious threat 
made by Lebanon Valley. 

McDiarmid registered seven field 
goals and two fouls in the second 
half which was a big factor in 
Swarthmore's victory. 

Lebanon Valley's play throughout 
was ragged, but occasionally it was 
interspersed with some brilliant indi 
vidual feat. Captain Albright led his 
team with eight points. The locals 
missed the services of Heller who 
left the game early in the second half 
via the personal foul route. TJlrich 
and Bartolet played well when they 
were given a chance in the game. 

(CONTINUED ON PAGE 4) 
O 



An unusual "mountain top exper- 
ience" was the privilege of all those 
who listened in on the Y. W. Friend- 
ly J Jour on Sunday evening in North 
Hall. 

Kulalie Morton was in charge f the 
meeting and conducted a devotional 
service. The program was then turn- 
ed over to Margaret Smyser, the ra- 
dio announcer for station Y WCA, the 
roof garden of Mountain Peak Inn. 
The announcer's introductions and 
her helpful hints and suggestions 
along the line of New Year's thoughts 
were very good. One by one the an- 
nounced took their positions at the 



SELECT CONFERENCE 
HONORS MISS COOPER 



MEETS DELEGATES OI 
LARGER SCHOOLS IN 
QUAKER CITY 



Miss Ruth Cooper and the Y or 
ganization of Lebanon Valley Col 
' e Re have been singuarly honored by 
an invitation to share the rare pri\ 
cIc £e of a conference with Dr. John 
Mott. Lebanon Valley has neve 
efore been included in ventures 
which only large i-.fuitutions shared 
1 »s therefore with a great deal of 
^easure that students see the Y. W 
President included. It is a very 
S1 £nificant fact that the invitation wa 
Personally directed to Miss Cooper 
an <l not to the Y. VV. president, nov 
Som e delegate who might be chosen 

1Ss Cooper's outstanding achieve- 
ments in the local "Y" especially in 

e local conference, have attracted 
^"ch attention in National "Y" cir 
cles. 



A 



M 



n excert from the letter sent to 



^ 1Ss Cooper by the Natioial Stu 

ta" 1 Secrctar y wil1 snow t,ve im P° r 
t j Ce of this approaching event and 

Honor that came with such 
Ration. "A few highly selected 
Uden ts in the east central states 
(CONTINUED ON PAGE 4) 



LEBANON HIGH HEARS 

CAMPUS MUSICIANS 



On Tuesday morning, January 14, 
a group of music students gave a pro- 
gram in the Lebanon High School 
assembly. All branches of the Con- 
servatory were represented, with 
the exception of organ. The perform- 
ers were very enthusiastically re- 
ceived by students and teachers. 
The program was as follows: 
A Little Day (Clay Smith), Life 
(Pearl Curran)— Mary Snoke Trout- 
man, contralto; Polish Dance (Sev- 
ern) — Miss Alcesta Slichter, violin- 



JUNIOR FARCE WINS LAURELS FOR 

CLASS; CAST IS WELL CHOSEN 



iiuLiii^cu look, ineir uubiuuiis ai me , . „ , , 

, , • , , iist- Dream Tryst (Cadman), Prelude 

microphone and carried out an excel- 5 L ' J v 

Jent program, varied, yet unified, (Ronald) — Irene Peter, contralto; 

which as Miss Smyser said, is typical 1 Rondo Capriccioso (Mendelssohn) — 

of YWCA station. ! Mary K Goshert> , pian i s t; Passage 

Alary Ax read a portion of Tenny- _ , , v M - coc 

, . „ ,. , , xl Birds Farewell (Hildach)— Misses 

son s Guinevere which set forth an 

nteresting idea to keep in mind this Miller and Peter; Celtic Love Song 
year. Ruth Armacost read a very clev- (Cadman), Love is the Wind (Mac- 
er recipe for a Happy New Year Tayden), Bobolink and the Chicka- 
which, besides being "catchy", con- dee (Carnevali)— Miss Leah Miller, 
tained the first ingredients properly 
mixed. The quartet composed of Dor- so P rano - 

othy Hiester, Dorothy Hafer, Helen The accompanying was done by 
Hain, and Hester Thompson broad- j Mildred Myers and Mary K. Goshert. 

casted a very beautiful number, ac- j q 

companied by Miss Slichter. In a 
hort, well-prepared talk, Gladys 
Knaub set forth the best New Year's 
resolution "Seek Ye First the King- 
dom of God and of Righteousness" 
without which we as "Y" members 
would be weak and powerless. 
Tennyson's "Ring Out, Wild Bells" 
read by Mary Snyder was a very ap- 
propriate selection. Station YWCA's 
violinist, Alcesta Slichter, broadcast- 
ed a lovely number, after which the 
weekly program ended with a prayer 
by Eva Peck. 

It was recently decided to add two 
new members to the Y. W. cabinet 



GEORGE NYE CHOSEN 
'32 QUITTIE EDITOR 

RUTH SHROYER, PAUL 
KEENE ALSO WIN 
STAFF POSTS 



George Nye was elected cditor-in 

chief of the 1932 Quittie at a meeting 
aoinei. 1 , 1 — ' ■ , 

. y~* 1 • 1 .1 TTi • 1 of the sophomore class on luesday 
Helen Hand and Elizabeth Ulrich u 

have accordingly been chosen to fill January 14. The position of asso 



(CONTINUED ON PAGE 4) 

O 

DATA PROVIDED FOR 

MASTER'S THESIS 

Dr. O. Edgar Reynolds, Head of 
the Education Department, has re- 
cently received a communication from 
Prof. H. S. Alshouse, Port Matilda, 
Pa., Principal of the High School, 
who is now engrged ill writing his 
Master's Thes : s at the University of 
Pittsburgh. The writer is asking Dr. 
Reynold's cooperation in his re- 
search work, stating that he is re- 
ceiving like help from four other col- 
leges. 

Prof. Alshouse is making a study 
of College Seniors' papers, which 
were written when the writer was 
aware that his English would not be 
corrected, to determine amount of er- 
rors commonly made by college sen- 
iors in their ordinary writing. Dr. 
Reynolds is complying with his wish- 
es by sendng to him the papers of a 
recent examination in a senior sec- 
tion. The analysis of 'die find : ngs will 
be very interesting and Dr. Reynolds 
has asked that he be sent a copy of 
the results obtained. 



COMIC EFFECTS OF "PRIVATE SECRETARY" GET CON- 
STANT LAUGHS AND STORMS OF APPLAUSE 
FROM AUDIENCE 



A laugh a minute was the record 
established by "The Private Secre- 
tary," the three act farce by Charles 
Hawtrey presented by the Junior 
class on Saturday, January 11. Even 
the melancholy and sober-minded 
laughed in spite of themselves at the 
humorous, unexpected and absurd 
situations. The play was produced 
under the personal direction of Dr 
Paul A. W. Wallace. 

When youtiiful aristocrats cannot; 
pay their rent and tailor bills, thje 
trouble begins and the victim seeks 
an escape from beseiging creditors. 
Such was the opening situation in 
this play. However, the youth, in 
addition t persistent creditors, was 
required to "sow wild oats" in order 
to win the approval of and finances 
fnom his domineering uncle. The 
amusing and ludicrous situations 
arise when the young mlan decides to 
evade his uncle, returning to New 
York after a sojourn of many years 
in India, and leave in his place a 
substitute, The Private Secretary. Not 
only did the eccentric secretary com- 
plicate matters in the role forced 
upon him, but was even mistaken as 
a medium by an aspiring spiritualist 
Like all good farces this one ended 
with all difficutlies solved on the 
stage and a long, lingering laugh 
from the other side of the footlights. 

The private secretary was the pivot 
of all mirth and abuse. From his 
first appearance to the last his con- 
stant worry was his "goods and chat 
jtels" and the greatest essential for 
his health his golashes. Into this 



ciate editor will be filled by Miss 
Ruth Shroyer, while Mr. Paul Keen 
will serve the staff in the capacity 
of business manager. 

George Nye is one of the most ver- 
satile men of the campus. Not only 
is he one of the leading football and 
baseball men, but he is also gaining 
a reputation in the scholastic depart- 
ment of college. 

Mr. Nye will find in his associ- 
ate editor', Miss Shroyer, a competent 
assistant. Miss Shroyer was the fir t 
freshman to be appointed to a La 
Vie staff and secured the honor by 
entering a competitive contest launch- 
ed among the freshmen last year. Of 
all the freshman who submitted pa- 
pers, Miss Shroyer was chosen as the 
best writer. 

Most staffs of the Annual are us- 
ually chosen later in the year. The 
sophomores this year decided to 
choose their staff earlier, in or'der that 
the leaders might have the oppor- 
tunity of observing closely the pro- 
cedure of the 1931 Qnittic staff now 
in the midst of their labors. It is 
expected that the experience gained 
by the observing staff will aid them 
materially toward accomplishing their 
task with the best possible efficiency. 



READERS DELVE INTO 

FIELD OF ROMANCE 



The Reader's Club met in their 
first r.i ating of the new year at the 
home of Dr. and Mrs. Wallace, 
W«dnes lay evening, Jan. 15, 1930. 
The Li' graphy, which they had been 
studying for some weeks, was forgot- 
ten for a while and "The Revolt of 
the De ert," by Lawrence and "The 
Royal Road to Romance," by Rich- 
arid Ha iburton, were very vividly de- 
scribed. 

Mary Jane Eppley and Eulalie 
Morton gave the "high-lights" on 
"The Royal Road to Romance." They 
brought out Haliburton's many and 
varied adventures in a very realistic 
manner. Walter Krumbeigle and 
Edward Schellenberg discussed the 
main issues of Lawrence's "Revolt of 
the Desert." It was a most thorough 
review of the book. After the speak- 
ers of the evening had finished, the 
attentive audience supplied their bits 
of information concerning these two 
review of the book. After the speak- 
ers of the evening had finished, the 
attentive audience supplied their bits 
important volumes. 



role Mr. Robert Eshelman fitted with 
turprising aptitude. In addition to 
proving himiself a star porter carry- 
ing two suitcases, eight boxes of vari- 
ous sizes, a bird cage and a. dog, he 
was a nimble acrobat who tripped and 
allowed himself to be thrust into 
corners with graceful nonchalance. 

The turbulent uncle whose waist- 
ine "measured ninety-nine" was 
played by Mr. Earl Wolf, who in or- 
dinary life wears a size thirty-six 
Hickok belt. He played the part of 
this corpulent gentleman with a 
shrewd insight into the idiosyncra- 
cies of men of this size and tempera- 
ment. The sociai-climbing tailor, 
whose tape measure even adorned his 
society apparel, found in Mr. Alex- 
ander Grant a suave and realistic in- 
terpreter. 

Miss Ruth Liller and Miss Caroline 
Fisher, the former as the agitated 
landlady and the latter as the ama- 
teur spiritualist, enacted their parts 
convincingly. Their characteriza- 
tions were so vivid that one readily 
forgot their personal identities. 

The remainder of the characters did 
as much justice to their rjoles. Mr. 
Joseph Hutchinson was seen to ad- 
vantage as the dignified elderly 
gentleman, converted to convention 
after a reckless youth. The two 
young ladies in their "teens", Misses 
(CONTINUED ON PAGE 4) 

JUNIATAGAMEWILL 
OPEN CO-ED SEASON 

SQUAD SHOWS GOOD 
MATERIAL FOR 
CONQUESTS 

The first game of the season will 
be fought by the girl's varsity bas- 
ketball team Saturday afternoon, Jan- 
uary 18, 1930, against the strong team 
of Juniata. 

Last year the premier combat be- 
tween these two teams resulted in a 
loss for Lebanon Valley. This year 
t he Lebanon Valley girls arc confident 
of completely submerging the Hunt- 
ingdon stars. 

The girls have had hard and heavy 
practice since their return from the 
Christmas vacation, and they are de- 
termined to be in the best of con- 
dition when they meet their! oppo- 
nents at Juniata. The line-up for the 
game is uncertain as yet. However, 
as Miss Fencil states there is much 
good material in the squad, the girls 
have an optimistic outlook for the 
best season of girls' basketball. Miss 
Blanche Cochran is captaining the 
team this year, while Miss Ruth 
March is the team's manager. 



I 



PAGE TWO 



LA VIE COLLEG1ENNE, THURSDAY, JANUARY 16, 1930. 



ESTABLISHED 1925 

A weekly publication by the Under- 
graduate Students of Lebanon 
Valley College 



EDITORIAL STAFF 

Esther Angstadt, '30 . . Editor-in-Chief 
Gladys Knaub, '30 • • Associate Editor 
J. Calvin Keene, '30 . . Associate Editor 
C. Alfred Shenk, '30 . Managing Editor 

SEFOBTOBIAL STAFF 

Grace Keener, '30 

Warren E. Burtner. '30 

Ruth Shroyer, '32 

Russell Morgan, '31 

Rbt. L. Raudabush, '31 

General Reporters 
Alcesta Slichter. '30 .... Conservatory 

A. Edgar Shroyer, '30 Athletics 

Hilda Hess '30 Clionian 

Hilda Buckley, '32 Delphian 

Philip Barnes, '31 Kalozetean 

Robert Rawhouser, '32 . Philokosmian 
Edna Early, '31 .... Alumni Reporter 

BUSINESS STAFF 

John Snyder, '30 ... Business Manager 
Alexander Grant. '31 

Assistant Business Manager 

William J. Myers. '30 

Circulation Manager 



FACULTY ADVISORS 

Dr. Paul A. W. Wallace, English Dept. 
Miss Mary K. Wallace, English Dept. 
Dr. Paul S. Wagner. Math. Dept. 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, a member 
of the Intercollegiate Newspaper Asso- 
ciation of the Middle Atlantic States. 



Single Copies 10 cents 

Subscription $1.50 per year 

Entered at the Annville, Pa., post- 
office as second class matter under the 
Act of March 3, 1879. 



WHAT IS THE MATTER 

WITH LEBANON VALLEY? 



This is the time of the year when 
commercial organizations all over the 
country are taking inventory. It is 
a fitting time for us t pause and 
make a reckoning of our| college, 
much as the commercial man does, 
to see exactly what are our assets 
and what our liabilities as an educa- 
tional institution. The best way for 
us to arrive at our conclusions is by 
comparison with other colleges and 
even universities. 

It is a universal human trait to 
live in one place and wish to be in 
another. It is therefore not strange 
that a college student should have 
matriculated at one institution and 
look longingly beyond his campus to- 
ward another — as that other seems 
the better realization of his ideal. 
Perhaps there is the young man or 
woman who believes he is living un- 
der the yoke of coercion. He or she 
looks to the university — undoubtedly 
the one with the greatest national 
prestige, Columbia — as that haven 
wherie the old order is truly obsolete 
and the new is springing forth. Yet, 
Upton Sinclair gives us an amazing 
revelation in the "Goose Step" of this 
old and illustrious fortress of educa- 
tion. "If you think I exaggerate 
when I state that the Columbia sys- 
tem means the deliberate exclusion of 
new ideas," he writes, "and of living, 
creative attitudes, listen to our plu- 
tocratic president himself, laying 
down the law on the subject of edu- 
cation: 'The duty of one generation 
is to pass on to the next, unimpaired, 
the institutions it has inherited from 
its forbears.' Just so! To keep man 
kind as it has been, forever and ever, 
world without end, amen!" Our ex 
alted idea of Columbia crashes to 
earth. 

The University of Wisconsin "has 
the reputation of being the most lib- 
eral institution f higher education 
in the United States" and it is the 
opinion of Mr. Sinclair that "the rep- 
utation is deserved." However, when 
Mr. Sinclair appeared there to give a 
lecture on "The College Student and 
the Modern Crisis", dealing specifi- 
cally with the contemporary trend 
of socialism, the Board of Regents 
held him at bay. Mr. Sinclair was a 
radical thinker; his views were those 
of an iconoclast. The board of Re- 
gents had dared to refuse his lec 
turc, in spite of the fact that about,' 
thirty-nine years previously that 
same body during a controversy over 



academic freedom had adopted the 
following resolution: "Whatever may 
be the limitations which trammel in- 
quiry 'elsewhere, we believe that the 
great State University of Wisconsin 
should ever encourage that contin-t 
ual and fearless sifting and winnow- 
ing by which alone the truth can be 
found." Mr. Sinclair states that the 
class of 1910 presented a tablet con* 
taining this statement, "but it was 
hidden in the cellar, covered with 
dust for many years, because the re- 
gents refused to allow it to be placed 
upon the building." Another dream 
of Utopia dispersed by the wind of 
reality! 

Chicago, that swarthy giantess of 
cities still in her youth, looms in the 
middle west as a tremendous power 
unadorned by tradition and free 
from the shackles of conventions. 
In the vicinity of that great 
city is Northwestern University. One 
would expect the university to reflect 
the spirit of the city. However, Sin- 
clair describes it as "one of those ter- 
rible places, of which there are scores 
in the United States, which began 
as little church institutions, and by 
the grace of grlaf't have grown to 
enormous size. Northwestern is 
Methodist, and has some ten thou- 
sand strictly pious students, and 
over six hundred instructors, and not 
a rag of an idea to cover its bare 
bones." Still another fortress crum- 
bles in our estimation as Sinclair 
sweeps his pen across the page. 

Syracuse is a part of the conven- 
tional East, with the atmosphere of 
aristocracy. Nevertheless, in "thi5 
land of the free" Sinclair pictures the 
ex-chancellor as an autocrat "No non- 
sense is tolerated at Syracuse; they] 
(the faculty) know what truth is, and 
how it should be taught, and you 
teach it that way ort get out, the 
quicker the better," states Mr. Sin- 
clair. The ex-chancellor on one occa- 
sion discovering that a certain pro- 
fessor was tolerant toward free sil- 
ver, fired him, "giving as his reason 
that the professor was tolerant to- 
wards Sunday base ball! Every year; 
he discovers that several others are 
tolerant towards something ungodly, 
and he fires them. There is no fac- 
ulty control, or] stuff of that sort; it 
is the chancellor who pays the sal- 
aries, and the chancellor who decides 
what the various men are worth — 
and he generally decides they are not 
worth much," Mr. Sinclair tells us. 
More educational destruction! 

We must, of course, take Upton 
Sinclair cum grano salis. Yet, we 
must remember that he had evidence 
to substantiate his exposures of edu- 
cational institutions or he would have 
been sued for libel and his book sup- 
pressed. In taking our local inven- 
tory, bearing in mind Sinclair's exam- 
ples as the criteria, what is the mat- 
ter with our own college? We shall 
not attempt to respond to the ques- 
tion as the answer is too obvious. 

O 

ARE YOU A SLAVE 

OF PUBLIC OPINION? 



F We Pay Tribute To- 





MISS MARY K. WALLACE 



Miss Mary K. Wallace is a graduate 
of Ohio-Wesleyan University, Class of 
1923. In her senior year the college 
discovered that she had sixty-five 
hours credit in a department where 
only forty hours were allowed. To 
overcome this situation the college 
created a department in Literature 
and a department in Composition. 
Besides these two she had completed 
within two years sufficient work for 
a major in Oratory. She is the only 
woman to receive an honorary Mirror 
Key from! Ohio-Wesleyan in recog- 
nition of her services to the school 
magazine. Miss Wallace is also a 
member of the national sorority, Gam- 
ma Phi Beta and the national ora- 
torical fraternity, Theta Alpha Psi. 

In her) senior year Miss Wallace 
was nominated for the Frances Ben- 
aett Scholarship at the U. of P. and 
the English schola:|3hip at Ohio 
State. Desiring to come East she took 
the former. 



Miss Wallace worked off the re- 
quirement s for her A. M. in one 
year's time. She was reappointed to 
the scholarship for two more years 
but unfortunately she was unable to 
accept it. Instead she accepted a one 
year revolving professorship at Ohio ! 
Wesleyan University, a position kept 
open for Ohio-Wesleyan graduates ' 
only. She then went to Hollins Col- f 
lege, Va., but heartily disliking the 
South stayed there only a year. 

In 1926 Miss Wallace had complet- 
ed arrangements to enter Columbia, 
to take up journalistic work, when she 
was offered the position of associate 
professor at L. V. C. 

It is here that Miss Wallace has 
released her pent-up desire for coach- 
ing dramatics. No one who has 
worked with her and under her can 
doubt that she throws her whole heart 
and soul into this work. 

She is a^so a thoroughly capable 
elocutionist. Anyone who has heard 
her rendition of "The Congo" has 
experienced that feeling of blood turn- 
ing cold. Then again she can r,educe 
you to uncontrollable laughter when 
she recites that vignette of life, "The 
Bald-headed Man." 

Her hobbies are reading, writing 
short stories, swimming, and above 
all collecting Indian elephants made 
of teak wood. She endtavors to add 
one each year to her already grow- 
ing herd. 

Miss Wallace is one of the literary 
advisers of La Vie. Because of her 
interest in journalism and her ex- 
tensive knowledge of the subject she 
is always liberal with her suggestions 
and helpful with her criticisms. 



PASSING OF EDWARD 



....Last Friday one of America's G 
est philanthropists, Edward W g 



Public opinion as a force in oui\ 
social world is a common subject of 
discussion. We all realize how many 
of our thoughts and actions are guid- 
ed by public opinion. Many charac- 
ters are changed by this dorminating 
force. Those same characters would 
probably have been far nobler had 
the persons been capable of with- 
standing the momentary gratification 
of public opinion and continued stead- 
fast to their ideals. 

A writer! once said, "When you 
find a man whom laughter doesn't 
hurt — watch out for him." Drawin.u 
from history for examples of such 
mtn, we find "Abe" Lincoln. All 
the better people in Washington 
society tittered when lanky Abe en- 
turd the White House, but now peo- 
ple pass his graven image with bared 
heads. Lincoln proved that the abil- 
ity to withstand laughter gives a man 
an almost dangerous power since 



laughter is our deadliest weapon. The 
man whom it cannot hurt is apt to 
go a long way. 

When something extraordinary 
happens on our campus and one per- 
son is known for his views opposed 
to those of the mob, we are all too 
ready to relegate him into that 
brotherhood of cranks and fanatics, 
who are essentially world-changers. 

It seems to be the popular thing in 
chapel to rebel against the desires of 
the faculty that we stand for every 
song, and yet for a long time we have 
been clamoring for a changed order 
of chapel service. This is only one 
of the small incidents wherein many 
of us join with the crowd in de- 
nouncing the new arrangements sim- 
ply because the other fellow thinks it 
a bad move. 

Why can't we be free individuals? 
Why shouldn't we form our', own 
opinions about matters without be- 
ing ridiculed? Our Master was not 
popular and yet we, who would be 
.patterns of him, lower our ideals mo- 
mentarily for the sake of public opin- 
ion. Let's follow outy dreams and 
ideals for a man's accomplishments 
can neiver exceed his highest ideal. 



CHEMISTS PROPOSE 

ADOPTION OF MOTTO 



-O- 



MRS. GOSSARD SHOWS 

STEADY IMPROVEMENT 

The latest report on the condition 
of Mrs. Gossard is that she is much 
improved. Although the progress is 
slow, the doctor is pleased with her 
condition. Mrs. Gossard is cheerfully 
looking forward to the time when 
she will be permitted to leave the 
hospital and stay at her sister's home 
in Baltimore, for she will not be al- 
lowed to return to Annville for quite 
some time. 



Convening at a special meeting on 
Friday afternoon, the Chemistrjy 
Club under President Noll trans- 
acted several matters of importance. 
Mr. Allwein was elected chairman of 
a committee to select an appropriate 
name and motto for the permanent 
organization of the club. In conf' 
junction with this idea, Mr. Spangler 
was elected chairman of a committee 
to design an emblem. Two new 
members were voted upon and ad- 
mitted to the organization. They 
were Miss Kathryn Hagner and Mr. 
Beck. Mr. Becker, the treasurer, 
gave a short report of the financial 
condition, including a plea for back 
dues. 



r eat- 
<*, 

was laid to rest at the foot nf ■■ 

1 his 

"Singing Tower ' at Lake W a l et; 
Florida. The body was laid j n 
crypt prepared for it at the base j 
the tower, The tower, which contain 
a carillon of seventy-one bells, w 
built by Mr. Bok and presented t 
the United States along with th 
bird sanctuary in which it stands j t 
was dedicated last year by p re ; 
dent Coolidge. 

Mr. Bok came to America f ron] 
Holland when a boy and worked 
himself up to a high position in Anicr 
ican life. He was for many years the 
editor of the Ladies' Home Journal 
and was also an author of some note 
He was an idealist who had the rare 
pleasure of realizing; the fulfillment 
of some of his ideals. As an editor 
he wielded an immense influence j. 
mong the women of the country and 
did much to bring about various re- 
forms. His death came last Thurs- 
day following an acute heart attack 
Fie was sixty-seven years of age. 



PASSION PLAY 



The students at Lebanon Valley 
who are planning to attend this year's 
Passion Play at Oberammergau will 
be sorry to learn that unless they 
have reserved their seats they are 
likely to be disappointed. All the 
seats for July and August, 160,000 
in number, which were reserved for 
the thirty-two performances have al- 
ready been reserved and most of 
them by Americans. Because of the 
early sell out, other foreign nations 
and Germans have influenced the 
managers to give thirty-two addition- 
al .performances during May, June 
and July. 



TUNNEY DOWN, NOT OUT 



Last Monday, Gent Tunney was 
down for a count of twenty-five nu«- 
utes when a gall stone was removed 
from his kidney. He first complain- 
ed of pain in his back on his return 
from an extended honey-m°° n 
abroad. An unusually deep cut was 
required to get through Tunney 1 ' 
thick back muscles. A stone the 
size of a bean was removed from 1 
entrance of the kidney. The patieO 
will be out of the hospital in abo« 
three weeks. 



CLOTHING OF QUALITY 

J S BASEHORE 

Lebanon, Pa. 



KREAMER BROS. 



STEINITE RADIOS 
EASY ELECTRIC WASHE R 

COLUMBIA GAS STOVES AND RANGES 
RUGS AND LINOLEUMS 

"House of Better Values" 
FURNITURE AND UNDERTAKING 

328 W. Main St. Phone 6R3 



Annvi 



He, P* 



—Shaeffer's Lifetime Pens- 

NONE BETTER ABSOLUTELY GUARAN' TE 

AN EVERYDAY NECESSITY FOR 
COLLEGE STUDENTS 

tj a y% T>f"> t > The Gift Store of Lebanon 

riAlvr P l^L/ l3 757-759 Cumberland Street 



p 



LA VIE COLLEGI ENNE, THURSDAY, JANUARY 16, 1930. 



PAGE THREE 



OK 



f - Bok, 

of his 
Wal es 

1 in a 
)ase ( 

ontains 
K was 
ted to 

the 
ids. ]t 

Presi. 

a from 
worked 
1 Anier- 
-ars the 
Journal 
ie note, 
he rare 
fillnient 
i editor 
lence a- 
try and 
ious re- 
Thurs- 
attack 
f age. 



Valley 
is year's 
gau will 
;ss they 
hey are 
All the 

160,000 
rved for 
have al- 
nost of 
: of the 
' nations 
ced the 
iddition- 
. y , June 



OUT 



iey was 
ive mi' 1- 
removed 

omplain- 
s return 
ey-nioon 
cut wa? 
runne/s 
one the 
from the 
c patie" 1 
in about 



lie, P>- 




READINGS OPEN NEW 

YEAR AT DELPHIAN 



INTRAMURAL GAMES 

SOLICIT INTEREST 



'A COLLEGE JOKE TO CURE THE 'BLUES' " 

— Jonathan Swift. 



There was a short session of Del- 
phian Literary Society on Friday 
evening, Jan. 10th. Eva Peck acted 
as Chaplain. She read a short poem, 
entitled, "Who Can Doubt Our God," 
by Woodworth. Miss Peck also read 
a poem, "The Optimists Creed'', by 
Christian Larsoi, which would be a 
very good model to follow, instead 
of making and breaking meaningless 
New Year resolutions. 

"A Dream on New Year's Eve" 
was read by Ruth Cooper. Few, if 
any, realized that this reading was en- 
tirely original on Miss Cooper's part. 
It contained a beautiful message of 
the presence of One who is ever urg- 
ing mankind on to "Climb". 

The Literary session adjourned to 
a short business meeting. 

O 



- — " ' ~ 

After Alcesta fell on the slippery North Hall steps Sunday morning, she 
commented that "This weather; makes unhandy walking." 

- : ' '■ — LVC— .■ . 

Prof. Bender (to Freshmen Chemistry class) : Now you know purple 
used to be a royal color because it was so 'scarce. Since h is easily obtain 
able, it is no longer a symbol of royalty. Hence, you don't see much purple 
being used. Just look around the class and you won't see any purple neck 
ties." 

All Freshmen immediately displayed their green ties and Dr. Bender 
proved his point. 

. ,:. — lvc— 

Moose Morgan, (Biology Assistant): Miss Peck, your ribs are out ol 
proportion, and yours, too, Miss Shively. 

To save embarrassment we might explain that the class was drawing 
ing leaves of ferns. 

—LVC— 

NEW LIGHT ON AN OLD SUBJECT 

Prof. -Butterwick: - What happened to the church institutions when the 
King broke away from them? 

Paul Evancoe: Well', they closed all the nunneries and monkeries m 
Germany. •>.»..«. [• . ; l' | ij 

Cal Keene gazing upon his mirrored 'reflection at LA-'' VIE meeting in 
parlor: We're surely an intelligent-looking staff. ... 

— LVC — 

The parody below was written by a co-ed after a slide down the ice- 
covered steps of North Hall and sung to the tunc of "I'm a Dreamer" by a 
chorus of those who preceded her in precipitous descents. The chorus in- 
cludes Madeline Sheddy, Alcesta Slichter, Maryellen Wivtmer, Mary Mc- 
Curdy, Irene Peter and Dorothy Boyer 

"Pni a f'aller, aren't we all? 

Just a faller, aren't we all? 

Each time I try to walk on ice, 

I take an awful spill. 

It's s flippy, smooth, and all, 

It's alarming how 1 sprawl; 

It's so real, it's not a bit ideal ^ _ 

And I feel like a fool, but don't we all?" 

Bh# v J '•'. ! — LVC— ; : - • 

Bob: Don't go, you*are leaving me entirely without reason. 
Dot G.: I always leave things as 1 find them. 

" ' "—LVC— 

Sthe: Darling, do you think there can, be people : n the moon? 
He.: How could there be? Where would tiny go u hen there is r, 
moon? 

—LVC— 

Betty Black: What sort of person is he? 
Mary McCurdy: Well, I've seen him applaud at the movies. 

—LVC— 

Have you heard about the girl who calls her boy friend "Someplace 
Else" because he isn't "all there"? 

, — LVC— 

WHAT A FRESHMAN WANTS FOR WEST HALL 

T - An automatic rising bell. 

2. Telephone extensions in Mike's, Betty's, and Mac's rooms. 

3. Electric fans. • 1 • 

4- An invention for keeping quiet hours quiet. 

5- A W. S. G. A. book that signs up automatically. 

6- A sweeper that picks up all the dirt. 

7- Several booths for the; seniors to entertain their boy friends. 
8. Traffic signal in the hall downstairs. 
9- Automatic doorbell answerer. 



KALO INITIATIONS 

PLANNED FOR FROSH 



It has been decided to hold the 
elections for officers of the winter 
term this week. N definite date has 
yet been selected, but it will be an 
nounced later. 

Plans are being formulated for the 
coming initiation of new members. 
As the next meeting of Kalo will 
be an important one, President Rhoads 
requests that all Kalos be prestnt at 
this meeting. Watch for announce 
ments ! 

O 



HUMOROUS SPEAKER 

IS EXPECTED HERE 



Fellow classmates, to uniform! The 
Annual Inter-Class Basket-Bail sea- 
son is at hand. Shall we go forward 
in "tank-like" maneuver and crush 
our opponents? 

Every loyal classmate should be 
willing to lend his assistance either 
on the "floor" or on the balcony. 
Whole-hearted co-operation is earnest- 
ly anticipated and desired in order 
t Q "bring home the bacon." 

"Sonny" Cunjack and the intrepid 
Bendigo shall unfurl their colors for 
the Seniors while "Joey" Wood, "the 
Invincible", Leo "Slide" Kelley, and 
"Pat Periseme" will pugnaciously dis- 
play their standard for the Juniors. 

Come one, come all, and armed 
with a thin dime; excitement and 
thrills galore after 6:15 P. M. 
Inter-Class Basket-Bail Schedule 
Jan. 20 — Seniors vs. Juniors. 
Feb. 3 — Frosh vs. Sophomores. 
Feb. 10 — Seniors vs. Frosh. 
Feb. iy — Junior vs. Sophomores. 
Feb. 24 — Frosh vs. Juniors. 
Mar. 3 — Sophomores vs. Seniors. 



Next Thursday morning Harry N 
Holmes, Field Secretary of the World 
Alliance for International Friendship, 
will address the chapel assembly on 
some subject relating to his work 

Mr. Holmes comes to our campus 
highly recommended as a humorous 
speaker who has a very strong rues 
sage to present to students. Fol- 
owing the chapel he will address the 
classess. The time and meeting 
places of these will be announced 
later. At 12:20 in the small dining 
hall he will speak to the History Club 
at a special luncheon, his subject prob- 
ably being about some phase of the 
KellognBriand Peace Pact. Mr. 
Holmes comes here as the fourth 
of the monthly chapel speakers to be 
secured by the Star Course Commit- 
tee. 

NEW OFFICERS ARE 

INSTALLED AT CLIO 



In the business meeting held pre- 
vious to the program on Friday even- 
ing, ChVs officers for the second 
erm wer!e installed. 

The retiring president, Gladys 
Knaub, presented the robe to the new 
president, Madaline Rife. Veiy fit- 
ting speeches were made by both 
presidents. 

"The New Year" was the program 
given by Senior Clio girls. A D - 
bussy prelude was played by H-lda 
Hess. Esther Angstadt read a dramat- 
ic Russian short story. To have a 
well balanced program, a lighter pa -t 
must be introduced. This was we 1 
done by Josephine Yake in her sing- 
ing of a popular song imitating Helen 
Kane. To help her along in this part 
of the program Margaret Smyser gave 
many funny anecdotes. 

The critic, Ann Gordon, with her 
usual ability gave the criticism of 
each number appearing on the pro- 
gram. 

The principle feature of the meet- 
ing was the presentation of a dress- 
ing case to Miss Mary K. Wallace 
in behalf of her untiring efforts and 
patience in the coaching and presen- 
tation of Clio's play "The Piper." 
The gift was presented by Miss Ann 
Gordon who thanked Miss Wallace 
ar.d expressed the appreciation of the 
society for her work. 



PHILOS NOMINATE 

NEXT TERM OFFICERS 



A business meeting of Philo was 
held last Friday evening. After the 
reading of the minutes by the secre- 
tary, nominations for new officers 
were made. They are as follows: 
President, John Snyder/ and Paul 
Barnhart; Vice Frjesident, Howard 
Hoy and Earl Wolfe; Recording Sec- 
retary, Kermit Taylor and Paul 
Keene; Corresponding Secretary, John 
Hughes and Robert Rawhouser; Critic 
Edgar Hertzler and Albert Sitlinger; 
Chairman of the Executive Committee, 
Warner Lebo and Fred Christman- 
Chaplain, Messers Werner and Zech; 
Pianist, Eshelman; and Sergeant at 
arms, Messers. Knisely, Emenheiser, 
Goodman, Dellinger, and Shellenber- 
ger. 

Calvin Keene appointed committees 
for the anniversary. These commit- 
tees will begin work immediately to 
make the affair a success. 

After? various reports the meeting 
adjourned. 



The 

"LOWDOWN" 

on 

Reversing Charges 





FOLKS at home would rather hear 
your voice than see your chirography, 
no matter how nicely you write. 

You, too, would rather hear their 
voices. 

Most College Men will concede us 
those two points. 

We, in turn, want to make a 
concession. 

So, we have made it possible - 
for you to telephone home with- 
out opening your own pocket-book! 

By a most satisfactory method which 
we call "Reversing the Charges." 

You go to the nearest telephone, give 
the operator your home telephone num- 
ber and tell her you want to reverse the 
charge. 

She will connect you with Home, you 
will have your chat; and Dad will get 
/V N the bill! 

Simple? Satisfactory? You'll be 
surprised! 

Just for fun . . . call Home 
tonight. 





1 



PAGE FOUR 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, JANUARY 16, 1930. 



QUAKERS SWEEP L. V. 

TO 37-24 DEFEAT 

(CONTINUED FROM PAGE i) 



SWARTHMORE 

Field G. Fouls Pts. 

Testwaide, r. f 400 

Dawes, r. f 000 

McDiarmid, 1. f 7 4 18 

March, 1. f 000 

Sipler, c 1 1 3 

Stetson, c 000 

Delhnuth (capt.) r.g. 306 

McCracken, 1. g 002 

Redman, 1. g 000 

Total 16 5 37 

LEBANON VALLEY 

Field G. Fouls Pts. 

Shroyer, r. f 000 

Ulrich, r. f 1 o 2 

Morrison, r. f o o o 

Stewart, I. f 3 1 7 

Orsino, 1. f 000 

Heller, c 1 o 2 

Bartolet, c 1 2 4 

Fernsler, c 000 

Albright (capt.) r.g. 248 

Sipe, r. g 000 

Light, L g o 1 1 

Frey, 1. f 000 



JUNIOR FARCE WINS 

LAURELS FOR CLASS 

(CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1) 




Total 8 

Referee— Borger, F. & M. 
O 



24 



FIRST Y. W. PROGRAM 

OF YEAR "BROADCAST" 

(CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1) 

the office of Custodian of propreties 
and devotional chairman respectively. 
A lovely candle light service consist- 
ing of a challange by the president. 
Ruth Cooper, to the new officers, to 
the old officer's, and to the members 
of the whole association, and their sev- 
eral responses followed the program. 
Mrs. Green read the very impressive 
installation prayer. The whole service 
ended by singing "Follow the Gleam" 
and silent, personal prayer for the 
New Year. 

Mrs. Green and Mrs. Wallace, the 
Y. W. advisers, and an unusually 
large group of girls attended this first 
meeting of the New Year. 

O 



SENIORS DISCUSS 

FINANCIAL STATUS 



The Senior Class held a special 
class meeting last Thursday afternoo 11 
for the purpose of discussing class 
finaces for this -"ear. Calvin Keene 
the Business Manager of the class" 
Annual, presented his Report which 
was as follows: Engraving Costs — 
$973.64; Photography $147.29; In- 
cidentals $293.75 and Printing and 
Binding $2367.42. The total cost of 
the Quittie was $3782.10. The receipts 
up to the present time have been 
$3082.10 which leaves a deficit of $700 
yet to be paid. Of this amount about 
$400 will probably come in from var- 
ious scorcesi so that $300 only remains 
t Q be paid by class dues. After some 
discussion a motion was made and 
seconded a motion was made and 
in order to pay off this and any other 
expenses that may arise during the 
year. It was pointed out that past 
classes had had regular dues their 
last year and some had made special 
assessments extra to pay Quittie bills. 
After considerable argument it was 
decided to return at the end of the 
year by equal distribution the money 
left in the treasury. The vote passed 
the motion by the slight majority of 
one. After passing of several bills 
the meeting was adjourned by Pres- 
ident Myer's. 

O 

RAUDABUSH HEADS 

SHOOTERS AS PREX 



Sara Ensminger and Dorothy Thomp- 
son, acted delightfully the roles of 
modern girls who like to "fall in 
love". Messrs' Russell Morgan and 
Robert Rouuabush not only express- 
ed in their roles the typical young 
Mr. America, but also did excellent 
work as background characters lor 
many of the secretary s humorous 
episodes. 

The Juniors must believe the above 
criticism, written by a LA VIE staff 
member in collaboration with a Jun- 
ior, good advertising. The proof is 
that when the review appeared in the 
"Lebanon Daily News" on Monday 
the class immediately posted the 
clipping on the bulletin board. The 
Juniors "stole a inarch" on LA VIE, 
which was not releasing its review, 
identical except for a few details, un- 
til today. While this paper knew the 
article was submitted to the Lebanon 
paper, it was not expected that it 
would appear as an exhibit with such 
speed. Of' course, this only serves 
as further proof of the Juniors' es- 
teem for this article. 

The Junior class desire to acknow- 
ledge the valuable help of Miss Mary 
K. Wallace and her assistant, Miss 
Be.;i'nita Strebig, in "making up" 
every member of the cast. 

The roles were as follows: Mr. 
Marsland, Mr. Joseph Hutchison; 
Harry Marsland, Mr. Russell Morgan; 
Mr. Cattermole, Mr. Earle Wolfe; 
Douglas Cattermoie, Mr. Robert 
Roudabush; Rev. Robert Spalding, 
Mr. Robert Eshelman; Mr. Sidney 
Gibson, Mr. Alexander Grant; John 
(a Servant), Mr. W. Gilbert Spang- 
ler; Knox (officer of the law), Mr. 
Dean Salada; Edith Marsland (daugh- 
ter of Mr. Marsland), Miss Dorothy 
Thompson; Eva Webster (her friend 
and companion), Miss Sara Ens- 
minger; Mrjs. Stead (Douglas's land- 
lady), Miss Ruth Liller; Mies Ash- 
ford, Miss Caroline Fisher. 

The committees cooperating to 
make the event a success were: Stage, 
Mr. Alexander Grant; Properties, 
Mr). Robert Roudabush; Publicity, 
Mr. George Becker and Mr. Harold 
Watkins. 



o 

JUNIORS TAKE PLAY 

TO HERSHEY JAN. 23 

"The Private Secretary," the Junior 
Class play, will "go on the road" on 
the night G f Thursday, January 23, 
when a performance is to be given 
in the Auditorium of the Hershey 
High School. 

There is no doubt but that the 
success of the play will be repeated 
in Hershey. The cast have been ex- 
pertly coached by Dr. Paul A. W. 
Wallace, and furthermore they have 
profited by the experience of the first 
night performance. 



Francis Barr, the President of the 
Rifle Club, resigned at a special 
meeting held last Wednesday, be- 
cause of lack of time to give the 
proper attention to his duties. Rob- 
ert Roudabush, the Vice-President, 
was automatically made President for 
the rest of the year. 



OPTICAL 

VT>t,E 




We offer 87 dis- 
tinct styles in 
glasses. The newest 
'n white gold, yellow 
gold, shell and rim- 
less. 



DR K G RUM AN 

O PTOMET.Ri/T 



ANON- PA. 



Lately news has reached us of the 
engagement of Miss Susan Bauchman 
'19 of Lebanon to the Reverend Mr. 
Kratz, a Baptist minister from Ill- 
inois'. '.Miss Bauchman, it will be 
remembered is a returned missionary 
from .Africa. According to her 
present plans she will not return to 
her duties in the foreign missionary 
field. 



Among the large audience which 
was present at the presentation of 
the Junior play on Saturday night 
were several of our Alumni. They 

we^je Miles KifehneA Archie Lutz, 
John Beattie and Lanston Mentzer 
of the class of '29, Mae Rider '26, 

Susan Bauchman '19, and Martha 
Early '19. 

O 



LOCAL CHAUTAUQUANS 

OFFERS VARIETY 



Many Chautauqua lovers wended 
their way to the High School Audi- 
torium, Tuesday, Wednesday, and 
Thursday, January 14th, 15th and 
16th respectively, to enjoy three 
days of first class entertainment. 

The Chautauqua was greatly en- 
joyed by those who attended. Some 
students were among the audience, 
students. 



PRINTING 



^hen you want work 
of the better kind see 

HIESTER-The Printer 



HOFFMAN STEAM PRESS- 
ING 

KEYSTONE HAT CLEANING 

STEYE WORNAS 



10 W. Main St 



Annville, IV 



CLOSE OUTS ON STATIONERY 



$1.00 to $2.00 boxes to sell at 
69c a box 

Only a few more die stamp Philo 
Letter Heads left at this price 

GRIMMS 

COLLEGE BOOK STORE 



CHEFS 
HOUSE OF GOOD 
FOOD 



Wm. Penn Highway 



Near Annville 



Meals Served at All Hours 
BANQUETS AND PARTIES 
Our Specialty 



SELECT CONFERENCE 

HONORS MISS COOPER 

(CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1) 



are having the unusual opportunity 
of spending part of a day in Phila- 
delphia, Saturday, January 18th, with 
Dr. John R. Mott, prominent student 
and international leader of his gener- 
ation. To every student interested 
in the values of life-religion comes 
the necessity for caking into account 
the situation in which he lives. We 
think that this day offers such in- 
imitable possibilities that is worth the 
necessary effort at this examination 
time to be present for this day of 
presentation and discussion.'' 



THE PENNWAY 
BARBER SHOP 

N. M. RAUSCH, Prop. 
Annvill*. Pa. 



DICTIONARIES 

English, French, Italian, German 
Latin, Spanish — 

All kinds at all prices 
From small pocket to large un- 
abridged. 

Come and see them. 

BOLLMANS 

33 South Eighth Street, 
Lebanon, Pa. 



D. RUSSO 

LOOK LOW PRICES LOOK 

Men's Half Soles 

& Heeels $1.50 

Men's Half Soles $1.00 

Ladies Half Soles & 

Rubber Heels $i- T 5 

Ladis Half Soles 80c. With 

Top Life $1.05 

Ladies Rubber Heels 

35c Top Lift 25c 

9 E MAIN ST. 
CENTRAL SHOE REPAIRING 
SHOP 



D. L SAYLOR & SONS 

Contractors 

LUMBER AND COAL 

ANNVILLE. PA. 



PATRONIZE 
LA VIE 
ADVERTISERS 



H W MILLER 



Annville 



HARDWARE 
OF QUALITY 



Pa. 



PHOTOGRAPHS 

LIVE FOREVER 

Ulrich's Studio 

820 Cumberland St. 



PRINTING 

PUBLICATION 
BOOKS, CATA 
LOGUES, STATION 
ERY, CARDS, TAGS, 

ANNVILLE PRINTING 
COMPANY 

ANNVILLE pa. 




RUSSEL and SPANGLER 

Our Agents At 
LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 
FINKELSTEIN 
Cleaners & Dyers 



TRY OUR HOME MADE 
SANDWICHES 

QUALITY LUNCH 

BREYER'S ICE CREAM 
A Specialty 



7 E. Main St. 



Annville, Pa. 



F. W. GERBERICH'S STORE 



FRESH GROCERIES, 
SODAS and ICE CREAM 



29 Sheridan Ave., Annville, Pa. 



For Quality 



Baked Products 



Patronize 



FINK'S BAKERY 



Main Street 



For 

QUALITY PLUS 

in 

Material and Workmanship 
Repairs at Special Rates 
Go To 

ANNVILLE SHOEMAN 
207 W. Main 



DON'T FORGET! WE SELL 
WHITMAN'S CHOCOLATES 

THE PENNWAY 



OPPOSITE P. O. 
A FULL LINE OF FRESH PASTRY DAILY 



PREPAREDNESS! 
SEMESTER EXAMS 
JAN. 24 TO 31 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



PRESENTATION OF 

JUNIOR PLAY IN 
HERSHEY TONIGHT 



VOLUME V 



ANNVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA, THURSDAY, JANUARY 23, 1930. 



CO-EDS TARE DEFEAT 
ON JUNIATA FLOOR 

OPPONENTS ASSAULT 
WITH SHOWER OF 
BASKETS 



PRINCETON SECURES 

SEVEN L. V. ALUMNI 



Lebanon Valley has seven grad- 
uates at Princeton Theological Semi- 
nary this year, it was announced at. 
Princton today. The Seminary is an 
institution of the Presbyterian 
Church, U. S. A. 

Practically every leading college in 
the country has representatives at 
Princeton this year, the report on en- 
rollment indicates. Among the out- 
standing colleges with students at 
Princeton Seminary are Princeton, 
Columbia, Harvard, Lafayette, Lin- 
coln, Colgate, Wooster, Westminster, 
Washington and 'J er re rson > Pitts- 
burgh, Wheaton, Richmond, Mary- 



Lebanon Valley girls received a 
complete set-back Saturday evening, 
January 18, at the hands of Juniata 
at Juniata in the score of 33~9- The 
Huntingdon stars sank basket after 
basket, and not once during the game 
were they even threatened by their 
visitors. f 

In the first quarter of the game, 

111 , , . . , j ville. Lebanon \ alley and Asbury. 

Tnniata ran a lead which it was ai- 1 . 
juiucua 1 . I i-nteen loreign colleges are repre- 

most impossible to overcome, rrice, . . . 

mo 1 , , _ . .. , I sented, and six foreign seminaries 

star forward for Tuniata, was high: , , n ■ . 

9l * r luina * ° I have also sent students to Princeton, 

scorer, making twenty-three of her 

scorei, ma b j il here are seventeen foreign countries, 

team's score. Ihe score at the end 1 

ted . , ,, , with a total ot 37 students, represent- 

ed the first half stood 23 to 5. 1 , _ . ., 

m ed at Princeton Seminary this year, 

In the second half the Lebanon j ag against fifteen fore ig n lands last 
Valley girls made a heroic effort to r 

roll up their score. However, a The tQtal enrollment is i;7 . Stu- 
"jinx" must have been following them dfints frQm Lebanoti Valley who are 
for even when the ball landed in the studying at Princeton Seminary are: 
hands of their forwards, such veteran I Edwin M _ Rhoa d, '22, of Ephrata, 
players as Yingst and Rice, failed ' 
t sink the shots. Although they 
were ragged on their shooting and 
their passes were not as they might 
have been, the Annville girls showed 
some brilliant work at times both 
in passing and intercepting. 

Undoubtly it was an "on" night for 
Juniata. All sections of' the team dis- 
played clever playing and the vic- 
tory was unquestionably theirs. 

Armacost as side center and 
March as center played a steady 
game. 

The line-up was as follows: 

(CONTINUED ON PAGE 4) 

DR. RICHIE IS HOST 

TO Y. M. CABINET 



Lr. Richie was host on Thursday 
evening to the Y. M. C. A. Cabinet 
w ho held their regular meeting at his 
home. The question of holding an- 
other informal conference on the 
c ampus was first discussed and was 
set aside to be decided upon at some 
future meeting:. The next matter 
taken up was the manner in which 
the campaign for funds for Albert 
Academy i s to be handled. Many 
suggestions were brought up and 
n °ted to be presented at a joint meet- 
ln g of the cabinets in the near fu- 
ture. 

The matter of presenting charms 
to the senior members of the Cabinet 
Was discussed and a design was 
ad °Pted as a standard. The charms 
are t be ordered immediately. 

After the business meeting Mrs. 
Hiehi 



Pa.; Miriam Daugherty Ulrich, '27, f 
Harrisburg, Pa.; Clarence Erb Ul- 
rich, '27, of Harrisburg, Pa.; Dewitt 
Philo Zuse, '26, of Wormleysburg, 
Pa.; Daniel LeRoy Fegley, '27, of 
Lykens, Pa.; Clement Bricker Mey- 
ers, of Greencastle, Pa. (Class not 
listed); Clyde Edward Rickabaugh 
'26, of Trenton, N. J. 

L V TOSSERS SEND 
HOME FOE DEFEATED 



T CABINETS PLAN 
MARCH CONFERENCE 



NOTED LEADERS WILL 
ADDRESS REGULAR 
CLASSES 



On the fifth and sixth of March, 
the Council of Christian Associa- 
tions will conduct a conference on 
the campus under the sponsorship 
of the Y. M. and Y. W. C. A. 

Three noted leaders of national as 
well as international fame will be se- 
lected by the "Y" cabinets from a list 
of five available. The men who can 
be secured are Charles H. Corbett, 
Secretary of the Council of Christ- 
ian Associations, New York City; 
Kenneth Beaton, missionary of varie a 
expreiences"; Marik % Starr, an Eng- 
lishman belonging to the British 
Labor Party; J. V. Tunga, member of 
the staff at Tungares Institute and 
Fred rich Libby, executive secretary 
of the National Council for the Pre- 
vention of War. 

The Conference will deal with in- 
ternational, racial and labor prob- 
lems. In addition t the address to 
be given in the morning chapel ser- 
the speakers will deliver lectures in, 
the various classrooms during the 
two days. 

O 



BOWLING IS ADDED 

TO CAMPUS SPORTS 



SUSQUEHANNA YIELDS 
TO SHOWER OF 
BASKETS 



the 
then 



*e served a splendid luncheon to 
members present. The meeting 
t turned out to be a general dis- 
CUssi o n on college life. The session 
^ as appreciated very much by the 
ys and various comments of appre- 
j on were heard. Informal meet- 
b n§s of this sort do much to create 
ett er understanding between faculty 
and students. 



Susquehanna was no match for the 
fast traveling Blue and White quin- 
tette when the latter sank the visi- 
tors with a deluge of field goals by 
the score of 43-2J on Friday, Jan- 
uary 18. 

Captain Albright and Heller drop- 
ed shot through the rim from all 
angles, and together accounted for' 
more points than the entire Susque- 
hanna team. Susquehanna used thre c 
centers in an effort to find one that 
could check the fast traveling Heller, 
but none were able to hold the Leb- 
anon Valley ace in scoring. 

Coach Mylin made many substi- 
tutions in order to find a running 
mate for Stewart, and after the game 
was "sewed up" he put in men who 
kept the game going at a dizzy rate. 

Frank bernsler who was sent in to 
replace the speedy Heller continued 
the brilliant playing of his predeces- 
sor and besides getting the jump 
-very time, succeeded in holding his 
man scoreless while he split the cards 
for two two-pointers. 

Earl Frey started as Albright's 
running mate at guard and played 
brilliant basketball until replaced by 
(CONTINUED ON PAGE 4) 



A new sport has made its appear 
ance among the men of the college. 
A bowling team has been organized 
and held its first march Monday 
night. The opponents were the 
Pennway Bakers. The locals came 
off voctorious with a lead of 106 
points for the three garries. Rearick 
was high scorer for L. V., bavin 
an average score of 166. Kohler -ran 
a close second with i6 ; >. The team 
included Hertzler, Kohler, Ed. Loos, 
Barr, Shroyer, and Rearick. Several 
professors are also included in tfcfe, 
team, but none bowled in this con- 
test. 



FAMOUS LOVE SCENE 

AMUSES CAGE FANS 

Modernized Shakespeare was in- 
troduced to Lebanon Valley when the 
famous balcony scene from "Romeo 
and Juliet" was produced in present 
day style between halves of the Sus- 
uehanna basketball game on Friday 
night. The cast included Mr. Vic- 
tor Kowalevvski as Romeo and Mr. 
Amos Knisely as Juliet. These two 
were selected for the drama because 
of their ability at courting and love 
making, these qualities being a re- 
cent discovery of the Men's Senaie. 
They ably upheld all advance reports 
and received hearty applause at the 
end of the act. 

The scene opened with Romeo glid- 
ing onto the floor singing "Tiptoe 
Through the Tulips With Me." 
Kowalewski possesses a good tenor 
voice and was well fitted for his part. 
In his hand he held a bouquet for 
his mistress. 

Juliet could not resist his impas- 
sioned plea and soon stepped shyly 
to the stage. She wore a gorgeous 
apron and a beautiful cap. A braid 
of flaxen rope hung over her shoul- 
ders. Romeo gave her his bouquet 
which was a large celery plant. Juliet 
sniffed its sweet odor to calm her 
trembling heart as Romeo sang "It 
I Had a Talking Picture of You." 

The climax of the act came as Ju- 
liet responded to the appeal of her 
lover. Her raucous soprano voice 
singing "My Fate Is In Your Hands" 
was the sensation of the evening. The 
spectators could not restrain their 
emotions as Juliet warbled on the 
high notes. At the conclusion of the 
song, Romeo caught Juliet in his 
arms and in the midst of thunderous 
applause bore her off the stage. ■ 

BROADWAY SUCCESS 
IS DELPHIAN CHOICE 



No. 14. 

TEAM RETURNS wfffl 
MARYLAND YICTORY 

MT. ST. MARY'S WIN 
OVER LOCALS IN 
CLOSE CONTEST 

The trip into Maryland on Monday 
and Tuesday of this week by the bas- 
ketball men was neither a decided 
conquest nor a certain defeat. While 
the L. V. tossers held Mt. St. Mary's 
to a hard fight and lost by only two 
points, the fray at Western Mary- 
land was a more decisive victory. 

The badly tottering Western Mary- 
land quintette was given another 
beating when Orsino and Stewart led 
the Blue and White to a 31-25 win 
over the former on the Westminster 
court on Tuesday, January 21. 

Stewart aided Lebanon Valley gain 
a 14-11 lead the first half by his sen- 
sational shooting and Orsino jumped 
into the spotlght the second half 
when he started swishing them 
through the cords. These two lads 
played brilliantly at forward berths 
and took the worried look off Coach 
Mylin's brow by their wonderful 
playing. 

Clary and Wellinger kept things 
interesting by displaying a great 
brand of basketball for Western 
Maryland. 

Coach Mylin made several substi- 
tutions the second half because 
of the hard playing on the trip. The 
subs held the home team in check for 
the remainder of the game. 

LEBANON VALLEY 

F.G. Fouls Pts. 

Stewart, r. f 5 2 12 

Bartolet, r. f 000 

Orsino, 1. f 5 1 11 

(Continued on Page 3) 

O 

sTFERENCE HELPS 

STUDENT DELEGATES 



[COLLEGE CALENDAR j 

{ Friday, Jan. 24— Literary Society = 
I meetings. Semester exams be- I 

1 §' in - . ! 

Sunday, Jan. 26 — Y. W. meeting I 
in North Hall at 5:45 o'clock. j 
Wednesday, Jan. 29— Reader's j 
Club. j 
I Saturday, ! ; el>. 1— >Villanova vs. L. j 
j V. C. at home: Girl's Basketball! 
j vs. Juniata at home; Second! 

Registration. I 



'THE TRUTH" WILL 
BIG FEATURE OF 
ANNIVERSARY 



BE 



semester begins. 



TO SUBSCRIBERS 



i 

There will be- 110 issue of LA J 
VIE on January 30 because of the! 
semester 

examinations scheduled j 
for the week of January 24 to 3 1.1 



The play which Delphian Literary 
Society has selected to present on 
their eighth anniversary is "The 
Truth", a modern four act play by 
Clyde Fitch. This play enjoyed a 
successful run on Broadway shortly 
after its production in 1907. 

It seems an odd coincidence that 
this play, "The Truth,'' will be given 
here on Washington's birthday, for 
history tells us that George Wash 
ington never told a lie. 

This play was presented by the 
Junior class of Ohio Wesleyan Uni 
versity while Miss Wallace was a 
member of the class. Miss Wallace 
at that time played one of the out 
standing women's roles in the play. 

Try-outs will be held sometime this 
week, under the direction of Miss Mary 
K. Wallace, who will coach the play- 
There are three exceptionally good 
parts for women and will afford 
splendid opportunity for the girl 
selected to portray their talents. 



"To sharpen and clarify the issue 
of the present need for highly quali 
fied men and women in the world 
mission of Christianity and to chal- 
lenge the interest of those whose 
minds and spirits are signally ready 
to consider the summons of our day 
in this world enterprise" was the 
main issue of the conference which 
Miss Ruth Cooper attended at Drex- 
el Institute, Philadelphia, on Satur- 
day. 

Dr. John R. Mott, Founder of the 
World's Student Christian Federation 
and Chairman of' the International 
Missionary Council and one of the 
world's great statesmen, was the cen- 
tral figure of this gathering of 108 
students from leading eastern col- 
leges and universities, made possible 
by the joint National Councils of the 
Student Y. W. C. A., Y. M. C. A. and 
Student Volunteer Movement. 

Miss Cooper considers it a rare op- 
portunity t have heard Dr. Mott, 
who just returned from one of his 
World Tours. He spoke as one pos- 
sessing honest convictions and the 
positive assurance which can co'me 
only to those who have had the back- 
(CONTINUED ON PAGE 4) 



PAGE TWO 



LA VIE COLLEGI ENNE, THURSDAY, JANUARY 23, 1930. 



ESTABLISHED 1925 



A weekly publication by the Under 
graduate Students of Lebanon 
Valley College 



EDITORIAL STAP7 

Esther Angstadt, '30 . . Editor-in-Chief 
Gladys Knaub, '30 . . Associate Editor 
J. Calvin Keene, '30 . . Associate Editor 
C. Alfred Shenk, '30 . Managing Editor 

KEPOSTOKIAL STAIT 

Grace Keener, '30 

Warren E. Burtner, '30 

Ruth Shroyer, '32 

Russell Morgan, '31 

Rbt. L. Raudabush, '31 

General Reporters 
Alcesta Slichter, '30 .... Conservatory 

A. Edgar Shroyer, '30 Athletics 

Hilda Hess. '30 Clionian 

Hilda Buckley, '32 Delphian 

Philip Barnes, '31 Kalozetean 

Robert Rawhouser, '32 . Philokosmian 
Edna Early, '31 .... Alumni Reporter 



BUSINESS ST AFP 

John Snyder, '30 ... Business Manager 
Alexander Grant. '31 

Assistant Business Manager 

William J. Myers. '30 

Circulation Manager 



FACULTY ADVISORS 

Dr. Paul A. W. Wallace, English Dept. 
Miss Mary K. Wallace, English Dept 
Dr. Paul S. Wagner, Math. Dept, 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE. a member 
of the Intercollegiate Newspaper Asso- 
ciation of the Middle Atlantic States 



Single Copies 10 cents 

Subscription $1.50 per year 

Entered at the Annville, Pa., post- 
office as second class matter under the 
Act of March 3, 1879. 



IN DEFENSE OF THE 

CAMPUS "BOOK-CRACKER" 

With the appearance of the exam- 
ination schedule in the Administra- 
tion Building the students turn to the 
books. It seems to be the popular 
time of the s&mester for gaining all 
knowledge. It is the time when the 
student abandons his passive, care 
free feeling and actually becomes ac- 
tive for a while. This is the only 
time of the year a conscientious stu 
dent is able to do his work to his 
own satisfaction and not be subjected 
to the taunts of his companions. 
Should he desire to prepare daily for 
his classes, rather than join the large 
crowd of "crammers", he no longer 
remains a good sport. 

There is a wide . difference in the 
reasons for coming to college accord 
ing to faculty members and students 
in this country. Quite naturally the 
faculty assume that students come to 
college for knowledge, while the stu- 
dents much prefer to indulge in ex 
tra-curricular activities. Due to the 
assumption Q n the part of the faculty, 
the s'udents are required to pass a 
certain number of hours in order to 
remain in college. The students who 
comply with the wishes of the faculty 
and enjoy reading in preparation for 
their courses are extremely unpopular 
with the student body. They are 
dubbbed with such names as "book- 
worms." It is /ather a deplorable 
condition in existence, and man}' 
freshmen are quite amazed to learn 
that it is not good taste to show 
a deep interest in the academic side 
of college life. 

In England the faculty members 
of such universities as Oxford recog- 
nize the two phases of college life. 
They recognize "e set of students 
as conning to college to acquire 
knowledge and they are known as 
the "readers." However, the term is 
not in the least contemptuous. Then 
there is another group, who find their 
tastes inclined toward athletics, so- 
cial activities, and othert phases of 
activities who are termed "extras". 
Naturally the recognition of these 
two classes greatly affects the curri- 
culum which is arranged accordingly. 
However, we do not advocate airy- 
change in our system of administra- 
tion but rather a change in the atti- 
tude on the part of the student body. 

When the student body is educated 
to the idea that some persons de- 
light in studying and in the master- 
ing of books, there will be removed 
the stinging conception that to study 



is to commit a wrong. Any person, 
whether paying for his education out 
of his own pocket or out of a guar- 
dians's should be entitled to derive as 
much benefit from his college life in 
the way he chooses without subject- 
ing himself to ridicule. Because the 
most of us prefer to 'cram' during 
examination week is no reason why 
the rest of us should be ridiculed for 
daily preparation. 

We do realize that much benefit 
can be derived from extra-curricular 
activities and many of us will con- 
tinue to entertain ourselves in such 
fields. The entire question resolves 
into one of tolerance of the views of 
our fellow men. College folks, of all 
people, should be tolerant and we will 
hope in the future for a more toler- 
ant attitude toward the "readers." 



BEYOND THE CAMPUS 



ALASKAN DISCOVERIES 



Among Our Seniors 




J. WITMER ALLWEIN 



Further evidence to uphold the 
theory that early American life came 
originally from Asia was discovered 
recently by the Stoll-McCracken ex- 
pedition of the American Museum of 
Natural History. 

The expidition, working on hints 
picked up from the native Alaskans, 
discovered an old burial place of 
early kings of that country. On a 
very small island, one of the Aleu- 
tion group in Umnak Pass, they dis- 
covered America's "King Tut" in a 
specially prepared sepulchre or sar- 
cophagus. The "King" was in a well 
preserved state. His features were 
distinguishable and the body looked 
natural. The part of the find of 
greatest interest was three other 
mummies of persons who were to 
accompany the King on his journey. 
One of these, a hunter, had a string 
of amber and ivory beads hanging 
from his nose. Dr. Whitelock of the 
American Museum, wdiere the mum- 
mies were placed, identified the am- 
ber as a variety found no closer than 
Korea. This fact proves the con- 
tact between the aboriginal Ameri- 
cans and ancient Asia and lends still 
further evidence to the theory that 
original life started somewhere in 
central Asia, probably in the Gobi 
desert, and spread from there in all 
directions. 



Quiet, unassuming and a student is 
J. Witmer. We see hira often but 
rarely hear him lor ins thougms aie 
ins own. It is a case ot being 
"seen but not heard", incieeu, it may 
be said he is the possessor ot prac- 
tically ail the qualities winch spell 
success. 

From the beginning of his course 
of study on our cmpus he has held 
his piace among tne "A"' students, 
of his class. He has not only con- 
hned his abilities to his own devel- 
opment, but has enabled his young- 
er schoolmates to beneht by his 
thorough training while serving et- 
nciently as assistant in chemistry, 
which is his chosen held. 

\Witrnei 1 is always on hand when 
questions requiring arbitration arise 
in the day students' room, for with 
his broad scope of knowledge he has 
demonstrated his ability as peace- 
maker in many disputes. 

Sincere good fellowship has been 
extended to all who have been so 
fortunate as to have made the ac- 
quaintance of this brilliant scholar. 
Never, howover, does he forget the 
source of his inspiration. Always 
and 1 everywhere he is in. her com- 
pany, discussing the exact sciences 
or perhaps more trival matters. 

Allwein will always be remem- 
bered as having had an unmarred 
scholastic record and we feel su^re 
that his future will be equally as suc- 
cessful. 



WAR STORY BARRED 



The wide spread effect of Remar- 
que's "All Quiet on the Western 
Front" can be seen by the fact that 
the Czechoslovakian war department 
has barred it from all military li 
brtiries in their country on the ground 
that it would have an unfavorable 
influence upon the young men who 
are in the service. Austria also has 
barred it from he military libraries 
and of course Mussolini has forbid 
den its appearance in Italy. 



A PROHIBITION BOMB 



Senator Borah received many col- 
umns of front-page newspaper public- 
ity as the result of the bomb-shell he 
threw in the dry-enforcement camp 
when he stated that prohibition "Will 
never be enforced with the present 
personnel from top to bottom". He 
strongly advocates the dismissal of 
all lax and inefficient officials, the put- 
ting forth of special efforts to try 
offenders, and the revocation of most 
of the industrial alcohol permits. 



INDIA CRIES FOR FREEDOM 

Mahatma Gandhi set off a violent 
explosion with his announcement be- 
fore the All-Indian Nationalist Con- 
gress at Lahore that he and the 
other leaders had abandoned their 
stand for dominion status of India 
and would be satisfied with nothing 



short of absolute independence. The 
following day the executive commit- 
tee voted 134 to 77 to submit to the 
conference a resolution demanding 
independence from the British Em- 
pire. 

Gandhi, formerly a conservative 
among the radicals, has been forced 
to take this radical step in order to 
maintain his leadership over the peo- 
ple. He has introduced non-cooper- 
ative measures to enforce the de- 
mands for independence. He is also 
calling a meeting of 1000 delegates 
next spring which will be the first 
meeting of the revolution. The pres- 
ident of the National Congress an- 
nounced that freedom would be 
secured by peace if possiible, but by 
war if necessary. 



-O- 



ALLWEIN ELECTED 

LAST SENIOR PREX 

Homer Allwein was elected the 
second semester and the last presi- 
dent of the class of 1930 at a meet- 
ing held on Tuesday. The other offi- 
cers who will serve during the final 
term are Ruth March, vice president; 
Helen Hain, recording secretary; 
Pauline Schaeffer, financial secretary, 
and Paul Barnhart, treasurer. 





ALUMNI NOTES 



ANNE GORDON 



Give Anne a problem to solve — 
why does Shakespeare do this or why 
did the French do that during the 
Revolution — and Anne's keen insight 
immediately threads its way through 
the intricate and subterraneous pas- 
sages of Shakespeare's mind as evi- 
denced in his art or delves with 
equanimity int the maelstrom of 
French revolutionary data. Anne 
gets below the surface of things. She 
is a deep sea diver in matters liter- 
ary. 

"1 wonder if there will ever be an- 
other Sara Bernhart," Anne has been 
heard to say. Her ambition is to be 
a tragedienne. Anyone who saw her 
as Veronika in "The Piper" will agree 
that her voice can make one feel the 
pathos of tragedy. "And when we 
sell our hearts, we buy us nothing," 
said the despairing Veronika. Bern- 
hart, of course, could have done that 
line better, but had Bernhart been in 
the audience to hear Anne repeat 
those words, she'd undoubtedly have 
applauded the impressive art of the 
local tragedienne. 

In spite of her stacks of work, Anne 
finds time to argue against the most 
stubborn opponents o" such impor- 
tant subjects as "What Constitutes a 
'Dutch' expression?" Furthermore, 
she is an ever-willing socializer 
around an inviting card table. 



Among the enthusiastic witne c 
of the L. V. vs. Susquehanna basket 
ball game, Friday, January 17, VVer 



two of our well known alumni, 
Mable Hafer '28, andMV. Charl e 
Gilbert '29. 



Miss Martha E. Early on Satur 
lay January 18th, announced her en 
eagement to Mr. Harry N. Edris, ^ 
a party given at her home. }vfj Sl , 
Early is a graduate of Lebanon Val- 
ey College v.ith ;he class ot ig r g 
The year after graduating she taught 
in the Junior High School at Mil- 
ler sburg, and since then has been 
teaching Latin in the High School 
of Palmyra, Pa., her home town. Mr 
Edris is a graduate of the Millers- 
ville State Teachers College. He has 
taught for several ears and is now- 
engaged in business. 

O ■ 



MINISTERS SUBDUE 

ERRING OFFSPRING 

Completely swamping the Minis- 
ter's Sons by a 51-12 score, the Min- 
isters, starring Hertzler and Keene, 
began a successful cage season last 
Saturday afternoon. 

From the beginning, the game was 
a run away for the flying parsons. 
Bucket after bucket was accumulated 
by the preachers while the wayward 
children meandered aimlessly around 
the court. Personals, in order to fin- 
ish the game, were disregarded after 
the scorer began to keep close tabs 
on the sons. Rhoads, starring for the 
sons, played a neat defensive game 
on the floor. Passes were thrown 
wildly and in all directions, seriously 
endangering the referee Patrizio and 
several spectators. The ardent sup- 
port of Prof. Richie was an influen- 
tial factor in the minister's decisive 
victory. 

Line up as follows: 
Ministers Minister's Sons 

Hertzler R. F. Kohler 

Sitlinger L. F. White 

Keene C. Burtner 

Mund R. G Rhoads 

Myers L. G. Emmenhiser 



E. J. SNAVELY AND COMPANY 

UMBRELLAS, LUGGAGE and SPORTING GOODS 
ATHLETIC EQUIPMENT 
628 Cumberland St. 
LEBANON. PENNA. 



CLOTHING OF QUALITY 

J S BASEHORE 

Lebanon, Pa. 



KREAMER BROS. 



STEINITE RADIOS 
EASY ELECTRIC WASHE R 
COLUMBIA GAS STOVES AND RANGES 
RUGS AND LINOLEUMS 

"House of Better Values" 
FURNITURE AND UNDERTAKING 

328 W. Mam St. Phone 6R3 



Annville, P a - 



Shaeffer's Lifetime Pens — 

NONE BETTER ABSOLUTELY GUARANTEED 

AN EVERYDAY NECESSITY FOR 
COLLEGE STUDENTS 

The Gift Store of Lebanon 
757-759 Cumberland Street 



HARPEL'S 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, JANUARY 23, 1930. 



PAGE THREE 




7* 

In and About the Literary Societies | 



KAPPA LAMBDA SIGMA 



Kalo has for some time seen the 
need of revising its. by-laws. As a 
result, a revised constitution was pre- 
pared by Mr. Zechman. After the 
members had voted upon it, it was 
accepted at the meeting on Friday 
night. 

Nominations have been made for 
the winter term of officers and the 
election is scheduled for the end of 
the week. 

O 



PHI LAMBDA SIGMA 



"A COLLEGE JOKE T O CURE THE 'BLUES' " 

— Jonathan Swift. 



Prof. Grimm) (finding that the senior co-eds total 56): Hm-m-m! That 
is what I call a bumper crop of janes. 

—LVC— 

joe Dawg Gawn asked Flookie if she knew of any Dawg Gawnes and 
s ;.e innocently replied "Now what are you trying to say to me in French?" 

—LVC— — 

Behold the inventress of the modern age — Ann Gohn is testing the tem- 
peratures of North Hall girls by touching them with a bit of wax candle. 
Want to know how many melted the candle? Ask her! 

— LVC— 

And now we have heard of a Junior who argued for twenty 
minutes (and then only stopped for want f breath) that a native of Switz- 
erland is a Switz. 

— LVC— 

A co-ed said that "she didn't want to go out to Kreider's Hill because 
she would only have to "come back down again." Now this same co-ed con- 
tends that the latter part iof her sentence is not a Dutch expression. If 
Dawg Gawn can't settle the argument for Miss Sheddy, will you help him? 

— LVC— 

WANTED! A HEATED DISCUSSION 
Prof. Butterwick: Any more questions? 

Stude: We haven's had our discussion on the existence of Hell. 
Prof. Butterwick: We'll keep that for tomorrow and then have hell for 
an hour. 

—LVC— 

Prof. Wagner: "You may bring your Trig books to the exam.'' 
Frosh: "May we open them?" 

— LVC — 

Betty Hoy: Will you love me as much when we are married? 
Her Chick: Of course. You know I always liked married women best. 

— LVC— 

Dot Heister, '30, thinks the Freshman class slow because she doesn't see 
an y '34 signs on the campus. Wake up, little Senior! 

— LVC— 

Dr. Reynolds: Miss March, when making an application do you think 
you should state your age and weight? 

Ruth: It's all right t state your age but never your weight. 



I Election of officers was held at a 
I business meeting of Philo last Fri- 
J day evening. Paul Barnhart was 
elected president of the society for 
the next term. The other successful 
candidates were: Vice President, 
F.arl Wolf; Recording Secretary, Paul 
Keene; Corresponding Secretary, 
Robert Rawhouscr; Critic, Albert Sit- 
linger; Chairman of the Executive 
Committee, Fred Christman; Chap- 
lain, Zech; Pianist, Robert Eshleman; 
Judge, Glenn Bendigo, and Sergeants 
at Arms, Knisely, Goodman, and 
Shellenberger. 



FAMOUS ARTISTS ARE 

HEARD IN CONCERT 




A BUGHOUSE FABLE 



A two-piano recital on Thursday 
evening, January 16, was the feature 
of the fourth concert in the series 
conducted by the Patroit and Even- 
ing News of Harrisburg. The ar- 
tists were Harold Bauer and Rudolph 
Ganz, the latter substituting for Myra 
Hess, who has cancelled her engage- 
ments on account of illness in the 
family. 

The program was of a classical na- 
ture, containing works of Bach, Mo- 
zart, Schumann, and Schubert. As 
their first encore they played an ar- 
rangement by Harold Baeur, of 
Schubert's famous "Marche Militaire." 
The other encores were of a more 
modern and atmospheric type. 

The music students attending this 
recital were Misses Alcesta Slichter 
Hilda Hess, Eleanor Kissinger, Dor- 
othy Haldeman and Mary K. Gosh- 
ert. 

O ■ 

MISSIONARY PROBLEM 

FACED BY RECRUITS 



The Life Work Recruit group, an 
organization which grew out of the 
Student Volunteers and Ministerium. 
met on Thui-day evening in North 
Hal! parlor with Lester Kauffman in 
charge. Devotions were conducted 
by Edward Zech. Elizabeth Kiester 
reported on and led a discussion w 
"The Measure of a Modern Mission- 
arv." Everybody entered into a very 
interesting open forum on the latter 
subject as well as on "What Consti- 
tutes a Missionary Call?" a digest of 
which was given by Henry Zechman. 

Following this part of the meeting 
there was a business session. Vari- 
ous committees were appointed, one 
of them a deputation committee with 
Fred Mund as chairman. 



CLASS OFFICERS ASKED 

FOR QUICK ACTION 



The 1931 Quittic Staff is await- 
ing the election of the second 
semester class officers in order to 
complete the class sections. It is 
imperative that those elected will 
have their pictures taken imme- 
diately so that the cuts can be had 
by January 31. 



DELTA LAMBDA SIGMA 



Delphian held its regular literary 
session Friday evening, January 17th. 
After devotional exercises conducted 
by Ruth Shroyer, a solo was sung 
by Dorothy Hafer, entitled "Bowl Oi 
Roses." Eva Peck entertained with a 
reading, "Betty Bowler's Awaken- 
ing." Prelude, by Debussy, was ren- 
dered by Mary K. Goshart. 

Elizabeth Lefever was formally in- 
stalled as pianist. She was unable to 
attend when the installation Q f offi- 
cers was held. 

The society held a short business 
meeting after the program. 

O ■ 



KAPPA LAMBDA NU 



A skit, written and directed by 
Margaret Smyser, featured Clio's pro- 
gram on Friday night. The story oi 
the skit opened with three fairies who 
lured their audience to the land of 
make-believe. Here a modern girl 
was helped to marry the man she 
loved while the ambitious mother is 
away. After the ceremony was per- 
formed, the fairies brought the audi- 
ence back to this world again. 

An excellent criticism of the meet- 
ing was given by Anne Gordon. She 
expressed the idea that a program 
ought to be given by the day stu- 
dents, giving them a chance to show 
their interest in the society. 

O 



DELEGATES PRESENT 

DAY AT EAGLESMERE 



The delegates to the conference at 
Eaglesmicre last June provided the 
interest for the Friendly Hour of the 
Y. W. C. A. The meeting was clev- 
erly conducted as a day at Eagles- 
mere, presenting all phases of life at 
the conference. 

An early morning quiet hour wa 
led by Mary Rank, while Mildred 
Myers played softly on the piano. As 
the day took its course, reports on 
several of the outstanding lecturers 
were heard 1 including Curly Page 
given by Naomi Shively and' Jack 
Meylin by Dorothy Garber. Each 
delegate also gave a brief outline of 
the work done by the discussion 
group which she had attended. 

A retreat day was one of the nove; 
features of the program. In present- 
ing this the girls left the conference 
for a quiet walk through the woods 
while Mildred Myers explained the 
value of this day set aside in the 
midst of the conference for medita- 
tion and an exchange of ideas. The 
meeting was closed with the song 
"Now the Day is Over."' 

O 



JUNIORS STRUGGLE 

TO OUTSCORE SOPHS 



The Junior Basketball team last 
Monday evening defeated the Sopho- 
more squad by one point amid pan- 
demonium. The game started prompt- 
ly at 6:30 p. m. The playing in the 
first half was fairly even, closing with 
the score in favor of the Sophomores 
15 t 14. Soon after the start of the 
second half the Sophs cut loose and 
sank four "buckets" gefore the Jun- 
iors dropped one. It seemed that the 
'32's could not penetrate the five-man 
defense of the Juniors and had to 
make their points from the middle of 
the court. The success of this long 
range bombardment, howcer, forced 
the Juniors to resort to the man-to- 
man defense, which was successful in 
stopping the '32 fieworks. Patrizio 



led the Junior attack that brought the 
score up to more even ground. 

Bowman of the Sophs led in the 
scoring with 12 tallies, leading Salek 
and Patrizio who had 9 apiece. The 
"ragged" feature of the game was the 
foul shootng as only 9 out of 24 tries 
were successful. 

Some of the high-spots were: The 
lack of a score keeper's whistle, which 
resulted in a "duce" for the Juniors, 
when Patrizio sank a shot while 
Lecthaler was walking off the floor. 
Pickle, '32, missed a chance of win- 
ning "the laurel" when he failed to 
make the penalty tries, entitled to 
him, at the end of the game. 

The "L" Club wishes to express 
their appreciation to the spectators 
for the moral and financial support 
offered and promises another "cork- 
ing" contest when the Fosh meet the 
second year men on Monday after 
exams. 

O 



TEAM RETURNS WITH 

MARYLAND VICTORY 

(CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1) 



Morrison, 1. f 1 1 3 

Heller, c 1 1 2 

Fernsler, c 000 

Albrigt, r. g 1 2 

Light, 1. f 000 

Frey, 1. f 000 

Total 13 5 31 

WESTERN MARYLAND 

F.G. Fou's Pts. 

Woolley, r. f 306 

Doughty, r. f 000 

Willinger, 1. f 248 

Hammill, c 1 1 3 

Engle, r. g 100 

Baker, r. g 000 

Clary, 1. g 3 1 7 

Total 10 6 25 

MT. ST. MARY'S VS L. V. 

Lebanon Valley ost the second 
heart breaker in less than one weeks 
time as Cornell's goal in the last few 
seconds of play gave Mt. St. Mary's 
a sensational 25-23 victory over the 
Mylinmen on Monday, January 20. 

Mt. St. Mary's got away' to a small 
lead in a close guarding game and 
led at half-time 13-8. ' By a wonder- 
ful rally Lebanon Valley overcame 
the lead gradually and both teams 
alternated in the lead, first one team 
and then the other going ahead for 
a point or two. 

Heller's brilliant playing kept Leb- 
anon Valley in the running. "Jap" 
Albrght collected tw field goals and 
three fouls before he was removed 
on four personals. 

McCall, although outplayed by Hel- 
ler the first half, came back in great 
style in the second canto and was 
a big factor in the victory. 

Lebanon Valley G F P 

Stewart RF o 

Fernsler RF 000 

Orsino LF 000 

Morrison LF o [ 1 

Bartolet LF 1 2 

Heller C 4 1 9 

Light LF 2 c*4 

Albright RG 237 

Frey RG o o 

Total 9 5 23 

Mt. St. Mary's G F P 

Ryscavage RF 2 2 

McCarrigan LF 1 o 2 

Lynch LF o 3 2 

McCall C 4 2 10 

Chanowski RG 1 1 3 

Connel ' LG 226 

Total 8 9 25 



PAGE FOUR 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, JANUARY 23, 1930. 



L. V. TOSSERS SEND 

HOME FOE DEFEATED 

(CONTINUED FROM PAGE i) 



Sweeney Light. He re-entered the 
game later in the second half and 
dropped a beautiful shot through the 
basket from the middle of the floor. 

Captain Glenn played the best game 
for the visitors and was the only one 
who seemed able to guard successful 
ly the local tossers. 



"Y" CABINETS PLAN 

MARCH CONFERENCE 

(CONTINUED FROM PAGE i) 



Lebanon Valley 




G 


F 


P 


Stewart 


RF 


2 


o 


4 


Bartolet 


RF 


o 


o 





Morrison 


LF 


I 


o 


2 


Ulrich 


LF 


o 


o 





Shroyer 


LF 


o 


o 


0' 


Heller 


C 


6 


6 


18 


Fernsler 


C 


2 


o 


4 


F*rey 


LG 


I 


I 


3 


Light 


LG 


I 


o 


2 


Albright (Capt.) 


RG 


3 


4 


IC 


Total 




16 


ii 


43 


Susquehanna 




G 


P 


P 


Rupp 


RF 


2 


2 


6 


Hummel 


LF 


3 


3 


9 


Rano 


LF 


I 


o 


2 


Dreibelbis 


C 


o 


o 





Gerhart 


C 


o 


o 





Wall 


IC 


r 


3 


5 


Mcpeehan 


RG 


o 


o 


o 


Glenn (Capt.) 


LG 


i 


3 


5 


Total 




8 


ii 


27 


Referee: Borger. 










DICKINSON 


vs 


L. 


V. 





ground of experience, which Dr. Mott 
has. His first statement in address- 
ing the students expressed the chal- 
lenging thought that "the question 
facing young people today is 'How 
can I invest my life now so that I 
can achieve the most for Christ and 
Christian ideals'?" To sum up his 
reply briefly, his address revealed 
that "courageous and conclusive 
thinking along with insistent pray- 
ing is needed to reveal the type and 
place of investment." As a whole 
Dr. Mott was very optimistic in his 
outlook on world-wide conditions, for 
he noted improved conditions since 
his last world tour. He places all 
hope for the future in missionarier 
who, he says, are ambassadors, inter- 
preters, and mediators. Many ques- 
tions of the students regarding any 
phase of life in any country at all 
were quickly and ably answered by 
Dr. Mott. 

; The various students were very 
hospitably received at Drexel and the 
famous Drexel Art Gallery, where 
meetings were held, proved in itself 
a great inspiration to the visitors. 

O 



CO-EDS TAKE DEFEAT 

ON JUNIATA FLOOR 

(CONTINUED FROM PAGE i) 



Brillhart's "Frank Merriwell," shot 
in the last minute of play, robbed 
Lebanon Valley of a beautiful vic- 
tory over Dickinson Wednesday, 
January p$ Substituting for Cap- 
tain Hoffman wh was removed from 
the game on account of personal 
fouls, Brillhart had been just another 
sub in a tight, well played game 
However, with only a few scondte 
remaining and Lebanon Valley lead- 
ing by one point, this sub dribbled 
down the floor and "made a one hand 
stab at the basket which was success 
ful. Foley was fouled and made the 
try good as the game ended with 
Dickinson leading 30-2S. 

Dickinson, led by Myers, got away 
to an early lead and led at half-time 
17-11. The second half Lebanon Val- 
ley came back fighting and gradual- 
ly overcame the lead. With only a 
few minutes remaining, Captain "Jap" 
Albright cut under the basket and 
received a beautiful pass to score a 
field goal and sent L. V. in the lead. 
Brillhart's shot soon after this com- 
pletely eclipsed Albright's pretty play. 

Heller and Myers, rival pivot men, 
both displayed wonderful scoring 
powers and the greatest interest of 
the game centered about these two 
rivals. They added a great deal of 
color and life to the game. 

Morrison who was substituted for 
Lebanon Valley in the second half 
played a splendid floor game and 
also conributed 4 fouls. 
Llebafon Valley Dickinson 
Stewart Right Forward Foley 
Bartolet Left Forward Palomkin 
Morrison Left Forward Brillhart 
Ulrich Left Forward 

Heller Center Myers 

Light Left Guard Hoffman Capt 
Albright Right Guard Smith 

Eield Goals: Stewart 3, Heller 4. 
Albright 2, Light 1, Foley 1, Smithi. 

Foul Goals: Morrison 4, Heller 3, 
Light 1, Foley 2, Myers 1, Hoffman 
I, Smith 2. 

Referee: Dayhoff. 



LEBANON VALLEY 





F.G 


Fouls 


Pts. 


Yingst, r.f 











Wagner, r.f. 


2 





4 


Rice, Lf 











Clark, l.f 


1 


3 


5 


Hershey, l.f. 











March, c 











Armacost, s.c. 











Hershey, s.C .... 











Rupp, r.g 











Cochran (capt.) 


l.f. 








Fields, l.g 

















9 



JUNIATA 
F.G 

Price, r.f 10 

Brocher, r.f 1 

Hower, r.f 

Fry, r.f 

Sell, l.f 

Fouse, l.f 

Fouracre, c 

Zilius, c 

Corsan, c 

Pentz, s.c 

Houch, r.g 

Howe, r.g 

Fleck (cap.) l.g. 



Fouls Pts. 
3 23 
o 

o 
o 




o 
o 
o 
o 
o 





Score 33,-9; Referee — Morrison. 



/ 

/ 

A 

V 

'CSS* 

NO 
DROPS 
USED 



OPTICAL 




We offer 87 dis- 
tinct sty I es in 
glasses. The newest 
'n white gold, yellow 
gold, sheU and rim- 
less. 



DR U GRUMAN 

O P T<t> M ETRI/T 

4 6 Ki 6 • v s r 



UP8ANON - PA. 



L. Y- 10 YEARS AGO 



THE JUNIOR PLAY 




The Junior play given by the class 
of 1920 was one entitled "Her Own 
House". It was presented under the 
direction of Miss Mae Belle Adams. 

The scene of the play was laid in 
England in Lady Bantack's boudoir. 
The plot of the play involved a Lord 
Bantock who brings his bride, Fanny, 
home. Fanny before her marriage 
was a music hall singer. She does 
not know she has married a man of 
position and has never told him he,rj 
history. She goes to his home only 
to find Bantock Hall filled with her 
relatives, the Bennetts who are fill- 
ing the positions of butler, house- 
keeper* footman, and maids. Mr. 
Bennett threatens Fanny and makes 
himself her! superior. She calls Mr. 
Mewte, her former business manager 
to her aid. The arrival of the show 
girls, Fanny's former companions, 
makes Fanny defy the Bennetts and 
she makes her'self mistress of her, 
own house. She wishes to leave, but 
Lord Bantock puts the Bennetts back 
into their own positions and Fanny 
remains. 

The play, as is true of all those 
given in the history of Lebanon Val- 
ley College, was a great success. 

From "College News" 



L Y 1 5 YE ARS AGO | 



CULTURED L. V. C. 



On the evening of February 26, 
1 916, a large group of the students 
of Lebanon Valley showed their love 
of music by travelling to Harrisburg 
to attend the recital in the Orpheum 
Theatrje given by Fritz Kreisler, the 
most widely known and foremost vi- 
olinist of the day. 

From "College News" 



PIANOS ' 

PLAYER PIANOS 

PLAYER ROLLS 
VICTOR RADIOS 

VICTROLAS 

VICTOR RECORDS 
SHEET MUSIC 

Miller Music Store 

738 Cumberland Street 
Lebanon, Pa. 



PRINTING 



When you want work 
of the better kind see 

HIESTER— The Printer 



CLOSE OUTS ON STATIONERY 



$1.00 to $2.00 boxes to sell at 
69c a box 

Only a few more die stamp Philo 
Letter Heads left at this price 

GRIMMS 

COLLEGE BOOK STORE 



CHEFS 
HOUSE OF GOOD 
FOOD 



Wm. Penn Highway 



Near Annville 



Meals Served at All Hours 
BANQUETS AND PARTIES 
Our Specialty 



Fine assortment of Watches, Ring^ 

Chains, & etc. 
New Century Chiming Grandfather 
Clocks 

LIGHT'S JEWELRY STORE 
51 West Main St. 



DICTIONARIES 

English, French, Italian, German, 
^atin, Spanish — 

All kinds at all prices 
From small pocket to large un- 
abridged. 

Come and see them. 

BOLLMANS 

33 South Eighth Street, 
Lebanon, Pa. 



D. RUSSO 

LOOK LOW PRICES LOOK 

Men's Half Soles 

& Heeels $1.50 

Men's Half Soles $1.00 

Ladies Half Soles & 

Rubber Heels $i- T 5 

Ladis Half Soles 80c. With 

Top Life $1.05 

Ladies Rubber Heels 

35C Top Lift 25c 

9 E MAIN ST. 
CENTRAL SHOE REPAIRING 
SHOP 



D. L SAYLOR & SONS 

Contractors 

LUMBER AND COAL 

ANNVILLE, PA. 



PATRONIZE 
LA VIE 
ADVERTISERS 



H W MILLER 



Annville 



HARDWARE 
OF QUALITY 



Pa. 



PHOTOGRAPHS 

LIVE FOREVER 

Ulrich's Studio 

820 Cumberland St. 



PRINTING 




PUBLICATION. 
BOOKS, CATA 
LOGUES, STATION- 
ERY, CARDS, TAGS, 
ETC. 

ANNYILLE PRINTING 
COMPANY 

ANNVILLE PA. 



RUSSEL and SPANGLER 

Our Agents At 
LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 
FINKELSTEIN 
Cleaners & Dyers 



TRY OUR HOME MADE 
SANDWICHES 

QUALITY LUNCH 

BREYER'S ICE CREAM 
A Specialty 

7 E. Main St. Annville, Pa. 



F. W. GERBERICH'S STORE 



FRESH GROCERIES, 
SODAS and ICE CREAM 



29 Sheridan Ave., Annville, Pa. 

For Quality 

Baked Products 

Patronize 

FINK'S BAKERY 

Main Street 



For 

QUALITY PLUS 

in 

Material and Workmanship 
Repairs at Special Rates 
Go To 

ANNVILLE SHOEMAN 
207 W. Main 



FOLLOW THE CROWD 
GO TO TH E PENNWAY 

THE PENNWAY 

OPPOSITE P. O. 
A FULL LINE OF FRESH PASTRY DAILY 



V 

L 



E 



qui 
sui 

del 
ati< 

45" 
Fe 

gr< 

of 

res 

ma 

on 

no: 

pa; 

Vil 

lea 

bri 

for 



01 
pie 

the 



Jl 



B 
Jui 
Th 
pej 
me 
Sea 
A. 
Soi 
for 
He 
the 
tur 
set 
ed 
tioi 
1 
ity 

lau 
inc 
He 
are 
she 



J 
car 
the 

mo 

her 

Pro 
f lie, 

th 



STAR COURSE DRAMA 
"SUN UP" THURSDAY 
FEBRUARY 13 



lawColktuennt 

LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



NOW'S THE TIME TO 
STUDY FOR THE 
JUNE FINALS 



VOLUME V 



ANNVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY' 6, 1930. 



No 15. 



L ¥. TAKES BIGGEST CAGE TRIUMPH OF 
SEASON FROM VILLANOVA WILDCATS 

EARLY GAINS OF OPPONENTS AROUSE HELPMATES 
OF CAPTAIN ALBRIGHT TO ASSUME 
INVINCIBLE OFFENSIVE 



Villanova's powerful basket ball 
quintette was given the biggest 
surprise of the season when a 
determined Lebanon Valley combin- 
ation sent them tobogganing under a 
45-27 defeat on Saturday evening, 
February 1st. 

The Wildcats started the game in 
great style, and in the early minutes 
of the contest it appeared as if the 
result would just be a matter of how 
may points Villanova would roll up 
on the home team. However, Leba- 
non Valley, by a beautiful display of 
passing and shooting, overcame the 
Villanova lead and forged ahead to be 
leading 23-19 at half time. Capt. Al- 
bright and Heller were responsible 
for 18 of these 23 points the first 

half. 

The second half was a whirlwind 
of action, Coach Mylin's men com- 
pletely bewildering the visitors with 
their accurate passage and deadly 



JUNIOR CLASS TARE 
PLAY TO HERSHEY 



"PRIVATE SECRETARY" 
PROVIDES FUN FOR 
AUDIENCE 



When "The Private Secretary," the 
Junior play, journeyed to Hershey on 
Thursday evening, January 23, it re 
Peated the success which it had for 
m erly W on in Engle Hall. The play 
w as under the direction of Dr. Paul 
A. W. Wallace. 

Some students who saw the two per- 
formances say that the one in the 
Hershey High School Auditorium was 
the better. Because of the farcical na 
tur e of the play, the painted stage 
sets which the Hershey stage provid 



ed 1 
tion. 



e nt atmosphere to the presenta 



. The auditorium was filled to capac- 

1 y and reechoed continually with 

a ughte r and applause. The audience 

'^eluded not only many residents of 

ershey, but also many alumni who 

a [ e Caching in the vicinity of Her 
shey. 



-0- 



Mr s. gossard makes 

strides to health 



i *trs. Gossard, who is still under the 
e °f several skilled physicans in 
J ° hns H °P k »ns Hospital, Balti 
t re- Rlr >ce her operation on Decern 

l>r<v 7 ' ^ reportC( l to be steadily im 
jj. ln S. Her present condition in 
t a * es that she will in all probabil 
°e able to leave the hospital at 
e e nd of two weeks. 



hooting. Heller continued to lead 
the Lebanon Valley scoring in the 
second half and every other player 
contributed to the final score. 

"Jap" Albright's and "Sweeney" 
Light's guarding was so close that 
the high scoring visiting forwards 
were held to two field goals each. 
Earl Frey, who was sent in to re- 
place Light, played a great defensive 
game and made two difficult shots 
from the side of the floor. 



DR. WALLACE ATTENDS 
UNIVERSITY CEREMONY 



On January 31st Dr. P. A. W. 
Wallace attended the inauguration ex- 
ercises of his brother, Dr. Edward 
W. Wallace, as Chancellor and Pres- 
ident of Victoria University, which 
were held in the Convocation Hall 
of the University of Toronto. Dr. I'. 
A. W. W r allace was one of the rep- 
resentatives of twenty-eight Ameri- 
can colleges and universities who 
were in attendance. Dr. Gaius Glenn 
Atkins, President of Auburn Theo- 
logical Semiary, spoke on behalf of 
the American delegates at the inau- 
guration ceremony. 

On January 30th there was a din- 
ner given in honor of the retiring 
Chancellor, Dr. Richard Pinch 
Bowles. On the 31st a luncheon was 
given to the delegates attending the 



Edwards, Villanova center, played a 
great game until he was put out by 1 conference. Among the speakers were 
personal fouls. Morgan, Burming- 
ham and Czeschick were the principal 
threats for the opposition. 

(CONTINUED ON PAGE 4) 

O 

GUEST TROUPE GIVE 

DRAMA OF MOUNTAINS 



The play "Sun-Up", the third num- 
ber on the Star Course program, will 
be presented in Engle Conservatory 
next Thursday evening, Febraury 13, 
at 8 P. M. 

This drama of Carolina mountain 
life was acclaimed one of the sea- 
son's best plays when first presented 
in New York City. Briefly stated, 
it is a play built about the reactions 
of mountain folk to the forces let 
loose by the World War. The Widow 
Cagle is played by Miss Marie Pavey, 
an actress of wide repute. 

There are some exceedingly tense 
moments in the play, but some rare 
comedy is injected by Pap Too, 
whose daughter Emmy becomes the 
bride of Rufe, the widow's son. 



two Americans, Dr. Alfred F. Hugh- 
es, President of Hamline University, 
and Dr. Edward H. Hume, Vice- 
President of New York Post-Gradu- 
ate Medical School and Hospital. 

AUSTRALIAN PLEADS 
FOR WAR CESSATION 



L V CO-EDS HAND DEFEAT TO RECENT 

CONQUERORS FROM HUNTINGDON 

TEAMS RACE NECK TO NECK THROUGH OUT GAME 
LOCALS HOLD VISITORS TO FINAL 
SCORE OF 34-30 



In a closely-fought contest, Satur- 
day, February ist, the Lebanon Val- 
ley sextette emerged victorious over 
Juniata with the score of 34-30. 
The Annville maidens entered the 
fray eager to avenge the defeat which 
they suffered at the hands of Juniata 
two weeks ago at Huntingdon. From 
beginning to end the game went 
smoothly, each girl acting as a neces- 
sary unit in the playing of the game. 
Some clever passing was made by 
both teams and the forwards of L. 
V. C. were "good" on their shots, 
sinking basket after basket. 

In the first quarter of the game 



PHILO COMMITTEES 

WORK ON MAY EVENT 



CONFERENCES SHOULD 
SETTLE DISPUTES 
OF NATIONS 



A bird's-eye-view of the. interna- 
tional situation regarding war or 
peace in the future was the intellec- 
tual treat for those who heard Harry 
N. Holmes, a native of Australia, 
when he addressed the student body 
in chapel, in the classroom and was 
after dinner speaker on January 23. 
Mr. Holmes is Field Secretary of 
the World Alliance for International 



On a twelve weeks tour in 1928 friendship and is thoroughly conver- 
Miss Pavey played the part of the|versant with the political and eco- 
Widow Cagle seventy-three times 
and was the subject of many enthusi- 
(CONTINUED ON PAGE 4) 
O • 



ALBRIGHT '28 JOINS 

COMMUNITY PLAYERS 



H. Darkes Albright is appearing 
with the Community Players of 
Reading, Pa., this week where they 
present the drama "Night." Mr. Al- 
bright was active in dramatics while 
a student here and was the director 
of senior play, Jerome's "Passing of' 
the Third Floor Back." 

As Mr. Albright has keen teaching 
in the vicinity of Reading for only 
a year, it is quite a local distinction 
for him to be selected for one of the 
roles. The play in which he is act- 
ing is being directed by Rev. L. Gns- 
wold Williams, a Universalist min- 
ister who is one of the most active 
exponents of dramatic art in that 
city. This play, as the Players de- 
scribe it, "will be done in silhou- 
lette, with only a blue floodlight, 
dimmed, in the background to light 
the stage." 



nomic situations of all the great na- 
tions. 

In his address at chapel, Mr. 
Holmes stressed the idea of nations 
at variance resorting to negotiations 
or conferences before taking the 
deadly plunge into warfare. He plead 
for "the raising of a superstruc- 
ture so that nations might arbitrate 
before going into war." He defined 
America as that nation of nations 
where "the sons of the world have 
come to be welded into a vast human 
family." His utmost confidence cen 
ters in this cosmopolitan people for 
the most potent influence toward 
realizing the "superstructure." The 
interdependence of the nations, he be 
lieves, has brought about a world sol 
idarity, a world civilization and a 
world citizenship. It is on the fact 
that national interests no longer re- 
main strictly national but affect and 
are affected by the interests of all 
other nations that his confidence in 
the future peace of the world rests. 
India and the Pacific 
T11 the addresses in Thilo Hall after 
chapel to the class in Public Finance 
and other students who had vacant 
(CONTINUED ON PAGE 4) 



Philokosmian Literary Society is 
etting off to an early start for its 
anniversary to be held May 2. The 
committees are appointed and sev- 
eral of them have been functioning 
for the past weeks. The committees 
are: 

Program and Play: John Snyder, 
Chairman; Paul Evancoe, Kermit 
Taylor, and Kenneth Waughtel. 

Invitation: Albert Sitlinger, Chair 
man; Elwood Meyers, Howard Hoy, 
and Samuel Ulrich. 

Favor: Edgar Hertzler, Chairman; 
Francis Barr, Clinton Allen, Mervin 
Schell, and Paul Emenheiser. 

Seating: William Myers, Chair- 
man; Charles Wise, and Chester 
Goodman. 

Refreshment: Frederick Mund 
Chairman; Harold Watkins, Warren 
Rugh, Paul Keene, Harry Snavely 
and Amos Knisley. 

Decoration: Luther Rearick, 
Chairman; Dominic Bovino, Preston 
Kohler, Stuart Werner, and Edward 
Shellenberger. 

Costume: Paul Barnhart. 
Alumnae: Oscar Stambaugh 
Chairman, and Robert Rawhauser 

Stage Managers: Fred Christman 
Chairman; John Hughes, Harry Zech 
Woodrow Dellinger, and Robert 
Lindsay. 

Music: Warren Lebo, Chairman 
Robert Eshleman, and Earl Wolf. 

O 

PROF. MALSH APPEARS 

IN CAPITOL CONCERT 



The Harrisburg String Quartet, in 
which Prof. Harold Malsh, of the 
Conservatory faculty plays second 
violin, will give their second sub 
scription recital Tuesday evening 
February ir, in Fahnesltock Hall. Stu 
dent tickets can be bought from Mrs 
Ruth Engle Bender. 



the Juniata girls began a lead which 
at first looked threatening but 
Lebanon Valley came on with a rush 
making point after point. The score 
t the end of the first half was 15-15. 

In the second half of the game, 
ach team came on the floor deter- 
mined to break the tie and to gain 
uch a lead that the other team would 
)e unable to overcome it. But the 
;amc remained a close contest, first 
one team making a basket, then the 
other. 

In the last few minutes to play, the 
Annville girls plunged ahead bring- 
g- the score to 34-30. 
No substitutions were made on the 
Lebanon Valley team and only sev- 
eral on the Juniata team. Each 
school showed clever playing and 
(Continued from Page 2) 

EDUCATORS EXAMINE 
TEACHING PROBLEM 



L. V. REPRESENTED AT 
COLLEGE PREX 
CONFERENCE 



Dr. Gossard, Dr. Reynolds and 
Prof. Grimm represented Lebanon 
Valley at the conference of the As- 
sociation of College Presidents who 
held a two-day session last Thursday 
and Friday, January 30 and 31, in 
Harrisburg. The meeting was at- 
tended by presidents and other fac- 
ulty members of colleges and univer- 
sities of Pennsylvania. 

A good program was presented, 
dealing with some of the problems of 
the colleges of Pennsylvania. The 
meeting on Thursday was called by 
the president of the association for 
the purpose of a round table discus- 
cussion of the problem of teacher 
training. The whole problem was 
presented to a group of about forty 
by ex-Governor Martin G. Brum- 
haugh, president of Juniata College. 
The main question in need of clari- 
fication was the future policy of the 
State Board of Education relative to 
the status of colleges and universi- 
aties in the training of teachers of 
the secondary level. Many repre- 
sentatives presented their views and 
a committee was appointed to confer 
with the state relative to the whole 
problem of teacher training. The dis- 
cussions promoted very good feeling 
and interest in the work now being 
done. 



PAGE TWO 



ESTABLI SHED 1925 

A weekly publication by the Under- 
graduate Students of Lebanon 
Valley College 



EDITORIAL STAPF 

Esther Angstadt, '30 . . Editor-in-Chief 
Uladys Knaub, '30 . . Associate Editor 
J. Calvin Keene, '30 . . Associate Editor 
C. Alfred Shenk, '30 . Managing Editor 

&EFOBTORIAL STAFF 

Grace Keener, '30 

Warren E. Burtner. '30 

Ruth Shroyer,* '32 

Russell Morgan, '31 

Rbt. L. Raudabush, '31 

General Reporters 
Alcesta Slichter, '30 .... Conservatory 

A. Edgar Shroyer, '30 Athletics 

Hilda Hess '30 Clionian 

Hilda Buckley, '32 Delphian 

Philip Barnes, '31 Kalozetean 

Robert Rawhouser, '32 . Philokosmian 
Edna Early, '31 .... Alumni Reporter 



BUSINESS STAFF 

John Snyder, '30 ... Business Manager 
Alexander Grant, '31 

Assistant Business Manager 

William J. Myers. '30 

Circulation Manager 



FACULTY ADVISORS 

Dr. Paul A. W. Wallace, English Dept 

Miss Mary K. Wallace, English Dept 

Dr. Paul S. Wagner. Math. Dept 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE. a membe 
of the Intercollegiate Newspaper Asso 
ciation of the Middle Atlantic States. 



Single Copies 10 cents 

Subscription $1.50 per year 

Entered at the Annville, Pa., post 
office as second class matter under the 
Act of March 3. 1879. 



POST-MORTEM 



, Examination week brings to ligh 
each time that scourge strikes us 
three types of students: 

1. Those who admit they study 

2. Those who deny they study 

3. Those (found in either the first 
or second group) who insist upon 
ten day post-mortems on the proles 
sors' quizzes. 

The first group we admire. They 
are honest. They justify their rea 
son for being here. If their harvest 
of "A's" is good, we can in all sin 
cerity respect them even though thej 
get the rewards we spend our college 
career coveting but seldom securing 
Their very sincerity could inspire in 
us nothing but our own good will 

The humbugs one might in all jus- 
tification call the second group. Why 
should we shun to ackno .vledge tha 
we study? Do we think that our 
ne : ghbors in ithe "dorms" or our 
so'ciates in the day student rooms an 
so dull that our diligence escape 
their attention. Here one notices th 
braggadocio assuming his a r of to' 
erance toward exams. He (or she, 
"will not crack a book for that exam 
He (or she) arrives on the scene at 
the scheduled time. Preliminary 
conversation discloses that he (oj 
she) "does not know a thing" abou 
the impending examinations. Bu 
when the returns are sent forth fron 
the professors' offices we notice that 
many of these pseudo-ignoramuse 
head the list with their superior 
grades. 

If the recipients of the 'mediun 
grades should attempt an analysis ol 
their reactions on these occasions, il 
would not be one of jealousy or even 
the lesser of the two evils, envy. It 
is more a feeling of revulsion tp.var- 
a fellow student -who insists on false 
pretenses. 

Almost every one of us has al 
some time or other been one of the 
third group offenders. We have 8 
certain exam at eight o'clock in the 
morning. Instead of passing in our 
books at ten o'clock and "letting tlv 
dead past bury its dead" we'll rant 
about that exam in the dining hall 
in our rooms and even in our Main 
Street coffee houses until those who 
were not the victims of that particu- 
lar exam think in execrative terms. 

The most physically fit on the 
campus emerge at the end of the 
week a trifle impatient with their 
comrades. Exams are fatiguing and 
no professor would deny that. How- 



ever, much of our energy is dissi- 
pated in groaning over the past and 
having, in our own turn, to tolerate 
with feigned composure the post- 
mortem analyses of our associates. 
"A word to the wise is sufficient." 
O , 

APATHETIC STUDENTS 

Upon several occasions appeals for 

more speakers have been made 
through the medium, of this paper. 

We have felt that a college student 
lives away from the world and had a 
need, probably more than any other 
class of persons, for speakers who 
might awake an interest in us for the 
world into which we will have to 
plunge. When we have been privi- 
leged to have an outsider on our 
campus, we at once realize trie im- 
mense gap between the theories and 

deals we live upon while at college 

tnd the harsh practical world we are 
going to meet. 

Heretofore, we, as students, have 
made a plea for more chapel speak- 
ers, but the incidents which took 
place on our campus during the visit 
of our last speaker were a bit dis- 

ouraging to say the least. Not one 
.erson failed to be enthused over the 
excellent talk Mr. Holmes gave dur- 

ng the chapel period. Exclamations 
were prevalent concerning '.he speak- 
er's unlimited knowledge and his 

olished delivery. The History Club 
was anxious to have the geitleman 
speak at a luncheon in order to g " e 
the students another opportunity of 
hearing Mr. Holmes. And what was 
the result? Simply this — after the 
meal was served half of the dining hall 
disappeared. Those emoty sea's 
seemed to show the fick'e^.e is of 
the majority of the student bod/, 
which preferred a half hour's so-'a - 

z ; rg to w'dening the scope cf the r 
horizon by learning about the prob- 
'©m of the Pacific. 

The students who were eajcer ' o re- 
main in the dining room af'er '.he 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 1930. 



Among Our Seniors 




CO-EDS HAND DEFEAT 

TO RECENT VICTOR 

(CONTINUED FROM PAGE 



the final score was not decisivi 
any point during the game. 
The line-up was as follows: 
LEBANON VALLEY 



Yingst, r. f 

Clarke, 1. f 2 

March, c 

Armacost, s. c 

Cochran, r. g 

Fields (Capt) 1. g. 



A. EDGAR SHROYER 



The stern, handsome, forceful phy- 
siognomy which appears above is 
none other than Alvin Edgar him- 
self. 

That "Eggie" is a man of talemt is 
doubted by none of his associates 
and that this talent is not restricted 
solelj- to mathematics, which is his 
chosen field of endeavor , is likewise 
well known for he is one of the most 
versatile men on the campus. 

.Lesides being a scholar he is an 
athlete, having played varsity basket- 
ball since his Freshman days. On 
his class football team he starred as 
a iiriple threat man is his underclass- 
man years. 

He is a musician of versatility. He 
IS an excellent vocal soloist and show- 
ed weil in that role in the recent 
Urs.m.s pageant. He is also an 
i.cccmpl shed violinist and plays' the 
"r.ormeuting sax" in an orchestra. 

As an actor he excels. He has 
appeared in several college and town 
plays and will be remembered for his 
fine character portrayal of Mr. Purdie 
in the class play, "Dear Brutus". 

V\ e cannot leave Shroyer without 
lef'errifig to one other accomplishment 
alt which he is past master. That is 
i he art of socializing. With the "boys" 
meal were embarrassed by the gr^ , e , eads e discussion to which 



number who leisurely walked a way, 
and it seems a deplorable condition 



ds hi 



personality. With tht 
opposite sex he is taking a post- 
that so many thoughtless ones shouM graduate course in this moat impor- 



be content to hear the "good stor'cs' 
the speaker re 1 ated. 

Why have we come to c6"e<? v ? " 
we not at an age when we fully r^a 1 
ize the problems of the wor 14 ? I 
we, as co'lege folks. ?re !?oV~ 'o p" 
)\v such opportunities slip, do 



lant i base of his college education. 

DELPHIAN PLAY CAST 

BEGIN REHEARSALS 



KATHRYN H. HAGNER 



JUNIATA 



goals fouls 


Pts. 


.. IO 


4 


2 4 




6 


10 




o 





o 








o 


o 





.. o 










IO 


3-1 



Kitty may be of a quiet disposi- 
tion but whatever she tackles leaves 
as forcible an impression among her 
associates as though she were more 
outwardly demonstrative. 

The science courses have had a 
strong appeal for Kitty ever since 
her arrival on the campus. She has 
been dissecting in the "bug"-ology 
laboratory and compounding chemi- 
cals until her proficiency in these 
sciences has won for her an assistant- 
ship in Zoology. Not even did the 
intricacies of electricity and correla- 
tive subjects expounded in the Phys- 
ics Department overawe Kitty. She 
took the course as early as her soph- 
omore year and came through a con- 
queror on General Grimm's battle- 
field where many have been slain by 
the deadly "E" bullets. 

Kitty is entire mistress of her draw- 
ing pencil. She draws with an exact- 
itude and delicacy that make even the 
classical students appreciate her 
sketches of anatomy. And Kitty's 
biological drawings have secured for 
her a large following — she has led 
while the others have been content 
to be patterns. 

Kitty is seldom seen about town or 
on the campus without her two soph- 
omore friends. But then there must 
be some diversion since Johnny left 
with his sheepskin. However, it 
seems a bit hard on the female sex 
when we recognize that it takes two 
girls to equal one Mr. Bixler. 



Hower, r. f 8 

Sell, I. f 2 

Souse, I. f 3 

Fouracre, c o 

Julius, c o 

Pentz, s. c ; o 

Ffouck, r. g o 

Fleck (Capt.) 1. g o 

Referee, Moyer. Scorers, 
McElwee. Timekeepers, 
Schrock. 

O 



goals fouls pt s . 



19 



b 
o 
o 
o 
o 



— 30 
Meyer, 
Miller, 



BECKER LEADS CLASS 

SECOND SEMESTER 



The mjembers of the Junior Class 
met ot Monday in order to elect 
officers for the second semester. The 
following were selected >to lead the 
Iplass of '31; President, George Becker; 
jVice President, Marie Ehrgott; Sec- 
retary, Dorothy Thompson; and Fi- 
nancial Secretary, Ruth Liller. 

O 

SOPHS ELECT NEW 

GROUP OF OFFICERS 



Officers for the second semestjer 
"were elected at a meeting of the Soph- 
omore Class on Wednesday. George 
Nye was elected president; Gladys 
Hershey, vice president; Dorothy 
Garber, secretary; John Morris, treas- 
urer, and Ray Pickel, financial secre- 
tary. The meeting was presided over 
by the retiring president Shortlidge. 



-'' - ; Delphian tryouts for the anniver i 
we sary play, "The Truth," were held re 
rcve to ourselves and others that centlv. Those who have been select 



ve are at college becatre fa' her s?id 
ve must go? Are we uneb'e to d's 
ngu sh between matters of temoor- 
ry va'i'e and those of permanent? 1." 
t was o' ly a nrit'er of carelessnes r 
">n our part which caused so man; 
vacant seats in the dining room. V 
e rmore ca-eful in the future! Let's 
ston ang'ing for more chapel speak 
-rs and begin talking about suppd-t 
ng those which come our way! 

REVIEWS OF READERS 

CENTER ON DUNSANEY 



The regular meeting of the Read 
r's Club was held at the home ot 
)r. and Mrs. Wallace Wednesday 
evening, February 5, 1930. The pro- 
ram was varied in content and was 
very entertaining. Lord Dunsanev 
as discussed with extracts of his 
ife given by Elizabeth Lefevre, some 
if his short stories by Helen Hair 
ind Mary Ax and several of his best 
lays by Eu'al'e Morton, and Am 
jrordon. The different reports proved 
o be excellent reviews of his best 
works. The review of his life showed 
Dunsanev as the man who was cap- 
able of giving to the world such 
works as he did. The meeting was 
most successful in its free and un- 
restrained discussion. 



ed to make the play a success and 
to add another memory to the the 
atrical presentations on the campus 
are: Bernita Strebig, Eva Peck 
Tru 1 a Kock, Mary Elizabeth Ste- 
phens, Dorothy Forry, J. Calvin 
Keene, Frederick Rhoads, Gardne 
Saylor, and Clarence Early. 

The cast has already begun inten- 
sive rehearsals under the direction 
Miss Mary K. Wallace, and will de- 
vote the greater part of their time to 
it during the next three weeks. 

O 

KALO-CLIO PREPARES 

FOR JOINT SESSION 

Faculty and students are most cor- 
dially invited to Clio-Kalo Joint Ses- 
sion Friday evening, February 7, in 
Engle Mall at 7:30 o'clock. The fea- 
ture of the program will be "Vaga- 
bond Blues." The leading roles will 
be taken by Miss Leah Miller and 
Mr. Kovolem-.ky assisted by a chorus 
of twelve. A social hour will be held 
mmed'ately following in Kalo Hall. 
O 

When a man grows old as I have, 
he then feels like restoring to pro- 
fanity as he ought not to do, at the 
misconception of life and the use of 
universities by feather-headed young 
men.— -Chief Justice Taft. 



E. J. SNAVELY AND COMPANY 

UMBRELLAS, LUGGAGE and SPORTING GOODS 
ATHLETIC EQUIPMENT 
628 Cumberland St. 
LEBANON, PENNA. 



CLOTHING OF QUALITY 

J S BASEHORE 



Lebanon, Pa. 



KREAMER BROS. 



STEINITE RADIOS 
EASY ELECTRIC WASHE R 
COLUMBIA GAS STOVES AND RANGES 
RUGS AND LINOLEUMS 

"House of Better Values" 
FURNITURE AND UNDERTAKING 

328 W. Main St. Phone 6R3 



Annville, P«i 



Shaeffer's Lifetime Pens — 

NONE BETTER ABSOLUTELY GUARANTEED 

AN EVERYDAY NECESSITY FOR 
COLLEGE STUDENTS 

The Gift Store of Lebanon 
757-759 Cumberland Street 



HARPEL'S 



LA VIE COLLEGI ENNE, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 1930. 



PAGE THREE 




'A COLLEGE JOKE TO CURE THE 'BLUES' " 

— Jonathan Swift. 



OBSERVATIONS FRAOM THE NOTEBOOK OF JOE DAWGONE 

Seen on the campus and in the vicinity: 
Prof. Crawford wheels a baby coach up Sheridan Ave. (coach is prop- 
erty of Mrs. David Shroyer.) 

Betty Black has been seen showing George Nye the campus and vicin- 
ity- 

Zappia, math, major, visits Dr. Wagner to admire his xmas tree. 
"Red" Barr, another math, major, spends one hour computing the exaci 
number of minutes put on his "sike" exam. 

Hester Thompson practices her tra-la-las on the tri-daily trips to the 
post. 

Prof. Stokes and Prof. Crawford have a snowball battle outside the 
Conservatory. Judging by the' amount of snow on the baritone's coat, 
the lawyer won. 

Even exams cannot keep Fred and Violet apart. Throughout tfhe 
week they could be seen (by sharp eyes) lingering in the shadow of North 
Hall from 6:30 P. M. on. 

Miss Wallace samples all the winter sports on Saturday afternoon. 

Mike Taronto spends Sunday afternoon at Prof. Grimm's home. (Here's 
a future candidate for Tamany Hall fame.) 

History repeats itself. Pencils fell as usual, during the recent scourge 
of blue books. 

A Taussig disciple maintained last week that "gold and silver arc 
bouillon." (Now thalt semester bills are due let's order our cases of soap 
early.) 

—LVC— 

SPOT THIS PASSAGE! 

" Oh, I'll DIE. I'll NEVER be able to pass this. I know NOTHING 
It will KILL m(e." 

And the agitated female disappears behind the ponderous doorway, 
of a building erected of granite in cold latter 19th century symmetry. 

Two hours later: Same female emerges from the building. She 
bounds to the side of . a passing chum and exclamis: "1 ought to make a 
good grade on that one. I knew *my stuff.' " 

— LVC — 

It's almost a catastrophe when the co-eds day dream over the date of 
the night before. For example in history class Eva Teck read "a heavy 
date" when the text read "a heavy debt." 

— LVC— 

Joe Dawg Glawn thinks he should pass on a word of advice to a num- 
ber of our co-eds. He heard from a dependable source that the cause of 
m *ny stammering and stuttering persons is that they indulge too fre- 
quently in the use of "baby talk." 

— LVC— 

Miss Johnson isn't quite certain which is the better of the two, con- 
secrated or concentrated study. 

— LVC— 

Mary Buffington's idea of an automobile jack is a bottle capper. 

— LVC— 

Prof. Richie declares that the students must "pass out"— of chapel— 
ln order to obtain a basketball schedule. 

— LVC— 

Trezise — I'm going to Heidelburg to school. 
Becker— Why? 
Trezise— They have lots of schnappc courses there. 

— LVC— 

fc St udent, on the way to register-Tin going to study this semester! (Ha! 
Ha ! Ha!) 



FROSH ARE SNOWED 

UNDER BY SOPHS 

Monday evening, February 3, 'the 
Sophs sank the Yearling's basketball 
squad 43 to 28. The score at the end 
of the first half, however, showed the 
Frosh leading 18 to 15. The game, 
held under the auspices of the 'L' 
Club, started ait the usual time, 6:30 
P. M. and was held on the floor of 
the Alumni Gymnasium. 

The Frosh started the fireworks, 
surprising the 32's with an avalanche 
that sufficed to keep the 33's ahead alt 
the end of the first half. Speg, play- 
ing running guard, led the Frosh at- 
tack and was a threat throughout the 
game. The second half started slow- 
er than the first and for a while the 
score hung fairly even. It was not 
to be for long. 'Bones' Bowman, 
captain of the Sophs, 'cut loose' and 
with the assistance of his teammates 
smothered the Frosh hopes. Fresh- 
man substitution at this moment 
could not stem the Second-year flood 
of field goals. 

Speg and Bowman of the Fresh- 
man and Sophomore teams respec- 
tively led in the scoring, Speg mak- 
ing 14 tallies to Bowman's 12. The 
game on the whole was an improve- 
ment over the preceding contest be- 
tween the Juniors and Sophomores 
as there were less penalty shots 
awarded; it also seemed to be faster 
passing game. 

Next Monday evening the Frosh 
play the Seniors. As the Seniors 
haven't shown there wares as yet, 
an interesting game is promised. The 
admission is as usual, ten coppers. 
Sophomores 

G. F. P. 

Pickle RF 306 

Shorltlidge LF 2 2 6 

McKusker LF o o o 

Salek C 4 1 y 

Lechthaler RG 408 

Bowman LG 6 o 12 

Kohler LG 1 o 2 

Totals 20 3 43 

F'reshmen 

G. F. P. 

Buynoski RF 3 1 7 

Clements . LK 1 2 4 

Waughtel C 01 I 

Zech RG o o o 

Speg LG 6 2 14 

Murphey ;■••'« '£ 1 2 

Wood" LF 000 

Kowelewski LF o o o 

Totals ;.; I J 6 28 

Referee, Patrizio;,. Scorer, Lehman; 
Time-keeper, Cunjack. 



13-MONTH CALANDER 



The thirteen month year has re- 
ceived additional support. The great 
mail order house of Sears, Roebuck 
and Company last month adopted the 
[3 month system. According to this 
plan January 2 will be the first day 
of each year. Thursday will be the 
first day of each week and Sunday 
will be exactly in the center. Each 
mjpnth will have 4 weeks. This sys- 
tem eliminates the calculations of 3c 
days has September, etc. which are 
now necessary and will also make 
Easter a set date. However, one day 
will be left over at the end of each 
year. This will not be included in the 
following week but will be a day by 
itself, which will be a holiday for 
everyone. 

At present in the United States 
there are nearly 100 organizations 
which are using this 13 month sys- 
tem. These report ithat it is more- 
satisfactory than the old Gregorian 
system. Over 500 firms indorse the 
idea of calender change and simpli- 
fications and the 13 month plan. The 
prospects are that in 1931 an inter- 
national conference will be held un- 
der the auspices of the League oi 
Nations to discuss the question. 



COLLEGE CALENDAR 



Thursday, Feb. 6 — Girls' Basket 

ball gamfe at Gettysburg. 
Friday, Feb. 7. — Joint Session of 

Clio-Kalo. 
Saturday, Feb. 8. — Basketball 
game, Ursinus vs. L. V. C — at 
home. 

Sunday, Feb. 9— Y. M. & Y. W. 
services. 

Monday, Feb. 10. — Student Recital 

in Engie Rail. 
Wednesday, Feb. 12 — Basket bal 

game with F. & M. — away 

Reader's Club. 
Thursday, Feb. 13 — Star Course. 



Y. W. C A. NOTES 

On account of examination week, 
a very informal worship service 
made up the program of the Friendly 
Hour on Sunday evening, February 2. 
Theservice consisted mostly of sing- 
ing, each person present having the 
privilege of having her favorite hymn 
sung. Sarah Ensminger, the leader, 
closed the meeting with a friendship 
circle. 



BEYOND THE CAMPUS 



MAMMOTH TELESCOPE 

Students in the local - Astronomy 
class will be interested in knowing 
that a '200 inch telescope is being 
built by- Dr. Elihu Thomson and his 
associates hr Lynn, Mass. This tele- 
scope, .which will cost almost as 
much* to " build as a battleship, will 
double the part of the universe that 
can be seen by man and will surpass 
in magnitude anything that has yet 
betel made. It will require several 
years to build the instrument and 
when completed will be. 16 feet 8 
inches in diameter and weigh between 
25 and 30 tons. 



APPLAUSE 

To -'applaud or not to applaud at 
concert recitals is the question. Leo- 
pold Stowkowski, director of the 
Philadelphia Symphony Orchestra, 
insists that the audience should de- 
sist from applauding as much as it 
cou ld— at least until the selections 
being played were finished. He docs 
not mean that all' applauding should 
be stopped, but he suggests that there 
should be a certain display of re- 
straint alor^gj with the enthusiasm. 
Talking at an entertainment of this 
type is highly distracting and applaud- 
ing at wrong moments is just as 
much so. 



GOSfT 





Wr ite Your Own 

HEADLINE 

. . . . for this ad I 



WE DON'T know whether 
to get sobby, and talk about 
the lonesome hearth, the 
vacant chair, etc.; or to get 
down to cases and talk Speed, 
Clearness and Low Cost. 



^?\)LS£g - what W ould you say, if you 
were writing an ad to College Men 
telling them to "obey that impulse" 
to telephone home? 

(There are so many impulses for 
a College Man to obey!) 

The first approach might appeal 
to their sentimental streak; the 
second, to their "practical" side. So, 
one appeal is as good as another, in 
our estimation. 

Take your pick. 

And write your own head- 
line to this ad by going to the 
nearest telephone and getting 
yourself an earful of H-O-M-E! 




1 




PAGE FOUR 



LA VIE COLLEGI ENNE, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 1930. 



GUEST TROUPE GIVE 

DRAMA OF MOUNTAINS 

(Continued from Page i) 



astic reviews, sermons and editorials 
praising the effectual portrayal of a 
worth while theme. Admittedly the 
Widow Cagle of "Sun-Up" is one of 
the most difficult and striking char 
acters of modern drama. Miss Pavey 
has appeared in "Abraham Lincoln", 
"So This is London" and other come- 
dies. For four years she was with the 
B. F. Keith Theatres and at one time 
conducted her own stock company in 
Portland, Maine. 

The actors chosen for the charac- 
ters have been selected with great 
care and all have had years of expe- 
rience on the speaking stage. 

Single admission will be 75 cents, 
reserved seats extra. The seat chart 
will open at Grimm's Book Store next 
Monday at i P.M. 

— O 

(Continued from Page i) 
AUSTRALIAN PLEADS 

FOR WAR CESSATION 



L. V. TAKES BIG GAME 

FROM VILLANOVA 



periods Mr. Holmes spoke on the 
current happenings in several of the 
foreign countries. He placed much 
confidence in the present peace par 
ley which is now in session at Lon- 
don, but could not predict its out- 
come. 

He discussed the friction that ex- 
ists between England and India. In- 
dia wishes for complete independence 
but Egland hesitates, due to the m 
stability of the Indian people. At 
present India has been given tei 
years of self-government and a com 
mission has been appointed to inves 
tigate the trouble. 

After dinner in the large dining 
hall he lectured to the History Qui 
and oither interested students on thv 
"Problems of the Pacific.'' 

He said that the Pacific Ocean i: 
be the coming problem in nationa 
affairs. The Panama canal has revo- 
lutionized the Pacific, and the dawn 
of its importance is just appearing 
There will then be a passive east lac 
ing a dynamic west. 

The destiny of America depends o 
the Pacific Ocean, whether it be in 
peace or war. The United State 
must change its attitude toward tht 
people of the East and make then 
feel that America is their best friend 

Japan's future depends on her in 
dustries. China is s.till struggling 
with her racial and national prob- 
lem. The troouble she had with Rus 
sia has awakened her somewhat na- 
tionally. 

He concluded by saying that tin 
only way to settle disputes right- 
fully is by arbitration and concilia 
tion, implying that war must be out- 
lawed. 

The star course committee are re- 
sponsible for securing Mr. Holmes 
He is the third of the speakers to ap- 
pear here under their sponsorship. 

O 

ANNVILLE RESIDENTS 

INTERESTED IN L. V 

On the evening of February 8th. 
1919, the first of the college and 
community meetings was held in the 
Engle Hall. These meetings were 
planned by the Y. M. C. A. of the 
college for the purpose of bringing 
the community and the college closer 
to-gether. 

The meeting was opened by re- 
marks from the Y. M. president in 
which he explained the purpose, scope 
and significance of these meetings. 
The audience then sang, "The Bat- 
tle Hymn of the Republic." 

A one-reel film, reviewing the sol- 
dier boys overseas was shown, fol- 
lowed by a comedy which afforded 
much mirth and enjoyment. 

Professor H. H. Shenk gave an 
interesting talk on Theodore Roose 
velt, comparing him with some of our 
great men of the past. 

Another five-reel film, entitled 
"Selfish Yates," was shown. The 



(Continued from Page 1) 

LEBANON VALLEY 

goals fouls pts. 

Stewart, r. f 124 

Orsino, 1. f 000 

Shroyer, 1. f 204 

Heller, c 7 5 19 

Albright, r. g 4 2 10 

Light, 1. g 204 

Frey, r. & 1. g 204 

Total 18 9 45 

VILLANOVA 

goals fouls pts. 

Burmington, r. f 2 1 

Egan, r. f 000 

Czeschick, 1. f 2 o 

Holland, 1. f 000 

Edwards, c 3 

Sullivan, c 1 2 

Tracy, r. g oil 

Harkins, r. g o 1 1 

Gardner, r. g 000 

Moorgan, 1. g 226 

Total 10 7 27 

O 

EURYDICE SCHEDULE 

LEBANON CONCERT 



A FALLEN IDOL— THE 

COLLEGE GRADUATE 



The first concert of the Eurydice 
Choral Club, under 'the direction of 
Professor Alexander Crawford, will 
be held in Lebanon, Saturday even- 
ing, February 15. sponsored by the 
Women's Club of that city. The da'e 
set for the home concert by the club 
is March 2c. 

At a recent business meeting of the 
club it was deeded that pearl en 
rusted charms would be given to al ! 
senior members who had served fo 
wo or more years. 

Dr. Orcel'a Rexford, the woman 
■sycho'ogst, who recently de~ignat* 
d tlie five best dressed men in the 
ountry, now de'-'ar"? ,1 " 
rs ought to wear lots of ye'io v. The- 
: ve in rurple vibrations and should 
Year yellow to ba'ance their tcm er 
iments." Our idea has always been 
hat bankers live in houses just like 



The world no longer awaits the 
graduates with open arms. For in 
place of 'the one graduate of the past, 
ten step forward now. The world is 
playing safe. She has learned many 
things in the past twenty-five years 
and the process has not always been 
pleasant. Now she hesitates until she 
finds which of 'the present-day grad 
uates most nearly resemble the "col 
lege-bred" of the past, and which 01 
them have merely undergone a four- 
year exposure to what purports to be 
an education. And after tthe hesita- 
tion and the judging, those who qual- 
ify are received into the fold, as of 
yore, and the others finds jobs or 
drift. 

What has happened? Have the col- 
leges been submerged in the mass at 
tack, or is the generation inferior? 
Since the race changes little in a com- 
paratively short length of time, the 
conclusion must be that the colleges 
have suffered. With their halls full 
of men who no longer have the old- 
time interest in culture and arts, the 
only recourse is to furnish the cours- 
es demanded and refer for consola- 
tion to past glories. Specializing has 
gradually become the field of the uni- 
versity and other institutions, until 
the arts college has been forced in 
self-defense to introduce other 
branches. — Haverford News. 

PIANOS 

PLAYER PIANOS 

PLAYER ROLLS 
VICTOR RADIOS 

VICTROLAS 

VICTOR RECORDS 
SHEET MUSIC 

Miller Music Store 

738 Cumberland Street 
Lebanon, Pa. 



THE PENNWAY 
BARBER SHOP 

N. M. RAUSCH, Prop. 
Annvill*. Pa. 



HW MILLER 



Annvillc 



HARDWARE 
OF QUALITY 



HOFFMAN STEAM PRESS- 
ING 

KEYSTONE HAT CLEANING 

STEYE WORNAS 



10 W. Main St 



Annville, P*. 



PRINTING 



Tther people. 



-Bucknel'ia* 



When you want work 
of the better kind see 

HIESTER— The Printer 



program was closed by the siug'ng 
of the "Alma Mater" by the aud- 
ience composed of many town folks 
ind many college students. 

ft is not certain whether these 
meetings accomplished their purpose 
or not. 

— From "College Ne vs." 

■ — O 

In view of ithe late disastrous foot- 
ball season played by Dick : nson, the 
>!ck:nsonian says th's: "Dickinson 
must look into prep schools, find foot- 
jail mater'al, wheedle it into coming 
o college, favor and coddle it when 
t gets here, put it onto the field and 
win games with it." The procedure, 
the paper goes to say, may seem 
lideous, but students, alumni and 
competition demand it. — Juniatian. 



VALENTINES 



A FINE SELECTION OF VALEN- 
TINES, FOR YOUR SWEET- 
HEART, MOTHER, FATHER 
SISTER, BROTHER, GRAND- 
k'OlKER, FRIENDS, Etc. 



COLLEGE BOOK STORE 



OPTICAL 




We offer 87 dis- 
tinct styles in 
glasses. The newest 
'n white gold, yellow 
gold, shell and rim- 
less. 



DR H GRU MAN 

OP TOM E T.R I J- T 

A- O N B T M J~ T 




CHEFS 
HOUSE OF GOOD 
FOOD 



Wm. Penn Highway 
Near Annville 



Meals Served at All Hours 
BANQUETS AND PARTIES 
Our Specialty 



Fine assortment of Watches, Rings, 

Chains, & etc. 
New Century Chiming Grandfather 
Clocks 

LIGHT'S JEWELRY STORE 
51 West Main St. 



DICTIONARIES 

English, French, Italian, German. 
Latin, Spanish — 

All kinds at all prices 
From small pocket to large un- 
abridged. 

Come and see them. 

BOLLMANS 

33 South Eighth Street, 
Lebanon, Pa. 



PHOTOGRAPHS 

LIVE FOREVER 

Ulrica's Studio 

820 Cumberland St. 



PRINTING 

PUBLICATION, 

BOOKS, CATA 
LOGUES, STATION- 
ERY, CARDS, TAGS 
ETC. 

ANNVILLE PRINTING 
COMPANY 




ANNVILLE 



PA. 



D. RUSSO 

LOOK LOW PRICES LOOK 

Men's Half Soles 

& Heeels $1.50 

Men's Half Soles $1.00 

Ladies Half Soles & 

Rubber Heels $1.15 

Ladis Half Soles 80c. With 

Top Life $1.05 

Ladies Rubber Heels 

35c. Top Lift 25c 

9 E MAIN ST. 
CENTRAL SHOE REPAIRING 
SHOP 



RUSSEL and SPANGLER 

Our Agents At 
LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 
FINKELSTEIN 
Cleaners & Dyers 



TRY OUR HOME MADE 
SANDWICHES 

QUALITY LUNCH 

. BREYER'S ICE CREAM 
A Specialty 

7 E. Main St. Annville, Pa. 



F. W. GERBERICH'S STORE 

FRESH GROCERIES, 
SODAS and ICE CREAM 



29 Sheridan Ave., Annville, ?a. 



D. L SAYLOR & SONS 

Contractors 

LUMBER AND COAL 

ANNVILLE. PA. 



For Quality 

Baked Products 

Patronize 

FINK'S BAKERY 

Main Street 



PATRONIZE 
LA VIE 
ADVERTISERS 



For 

QUALITY PLUS 

in 

Material and Workmanship 
Repairs at Special Rates 
Go To 

ANNVILLE SHOEMAN 

207 W. Main 



WHITMAN'S VALENTINE PACKAGES 
HAVE ARRIVED 

THE PENNWAY 

OPPOSITE P. O. 
A FULL LINE OF FRESH PASTRY DAILY 



A "BREAK" FOR THE 

CO-EDS! L. V. vs. 
EAST STROUDSBURG 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



BIG HOME "DOUBLE 
HEADER" SET FOR 
SATURDAY, FEB. 15 



VOLUME V 



ANNVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 1930 



No. 16 



ORATORS TO COMPETE 
FOR $5000 PRIZES 

FINAL CONTESTANTS 
WILL ORATE AT 
LOS ANGELES 



HISTORY MEMBERS 

DEBATE PROGRESS 



To every college student in Amer- 
ica comes the opportunity of entering 
the Sixth National Intercollegiate 
Oratorical Contest on the Constitu- 
tion inaugurated and conducted by 
the Better America Federation of 
California. The 1930 National Final 
will take place on June 19- at Los 
Angeles. The sum of $5000 in cash 
prizes will be awarded to the sever 
people who stand highest, first prize 
being $1500 and the last $400. 

The oration may be on any of six 
teen designated subjects relating tc 
the Constitution, which the director? 
have chosen and it must not excee 
1500 words in length. Each college 
will have to finish selecting its con 
testant by April 15. Various region 
al and zone contests will then decide 
on the final contestants. 

Last year the first elimination con 
test in this section was held on the 
local campus with Miss Carol Brin 
ser '29 representing Lebanon Vallej 
in the forensic battle against six met 
from surrounding colleges. 

Professor Stevenson will direct an 
students who are desirous of compet- 
ing in the contest and will conduc 
a school elimination to choose Leba 
non Valley's orator. 

— O 

'31 AIM IS BIGGER, 

BETTER QUITTIE 



A debate on progress was the big 
eature of the regular semi-monthly 
meeting of the History Club held in 
Kalo Hall, Wednesday evening at 

The first number on the program 
was a book review by Helen Hain. 
She gave an interesting resume of the 
book entitled, "Who Will Win, Eu- 
rope or America?" The theme of the 
book centers on the civilizations of 
both Europe and America. Which 
civilization will dominate the world, 
European or American? This is one 
of the most speculative questions o. 
current time. While it provides good 
material for argument, it hardly bears 
a definite answer. 

The next feature on the program 
was the debate, Resolved, That 
Progress is a Delusion. The nega- 
ive contestants were Frederick Mund 
and Dorothy Hyland, the affirmatives 
Paul Emenheiser and Mary Ax, 

After the speakers had their chance 
to dispose of the question, it was 
thrown open to the club members for 
final analysis. They decided in favor 
of the negative side. 



Work on the 1931 Quittie has beer 
m °st intense during the past few days 
The few remaining photographs are 
rapidly being taken, the written ma 
terial i s coming in from all sides, and 
every other aspect of the work is as 
-urning final shape. Several imipor 
tan t staff meetings have been held, a 
which several innovations have beei 
adopted. It is the belief of the stai 
that these will be most popular wit 
^ Ile student body, and it hopes t 
ee P these several matters a secret 
Untl1 the books are released. 
" rhe sales manager, Mr. Becker, i 
ready at work requesting the Alum 
ni to subscribe for the annual, for i 
£ the aim of the staff to try to sell 
" V. graduates as many 1931 Quit 
es as possible. The campus sale 

nea 1,PaiRn wil1 be conducted in t,H 
ar future and the manager expect 

Ioo % subscription from the sfru 
dent body. 

^Advertising i s being handled by 

e - r ' G r ant, w h i s on the trail of for 

', Rn advertising as well as local mer 
c nants. 

^together, the staff is whipping 
e Material accumulated during th. 

Past InlC . , . 1 

nan year into the "bigger and 
etter Quittie". 



NAT'L SECRETARIES 
ARE GUESTS OF T 



>LAY °L G s™ co LOR GETTYSBURG YIELDS 



LEADERS MEET WITH 
ASSOCIATIONS FOR 
HELPFUL TALKS 



-O- 



CO-EDS STAMPEDED 
IN GETTYSBURG CAGE 



TECHNIQUE OF GAME 
APPROACHES RULES 
FOR MEN 



In a rough, free-for-all game the 
girls of Lebanon Valley were defeat- 
ed Thursday evening, February 6, on 
the Gettysburg floor to the score of 
32-17., From beginning to end the 
game resembled a football game 
rather than a basketball match. 

In the first half of the game th 
Gettysburg team made a good show 
ing with the score 29-9 at the end o 
the half. Fouls were made by th 
Gettysburg sextette in rapid succes 
sion but unfortunately the Lebanon 
Valley forwards were not given th 
benefit of the fouling by being able 
to have the free shots. 

In the second half of the game 
the ire of the Lebanon Valleyites 
was aroused and they walked on th 
floor determined to give the Gettys- 
burg team a run for the victory. The- 
fought hard, but the final result wa 
,7-17 in favor of the Gettysburg 
squad. 

It was a rough and tumble from be 
-inning to end and the game ea- 
tery truthfully be called a whirlwind 
of action. Practically every girl whe 
made the trip was given a chance tc 
olay. Because of the nature of the 
-jame, Miss Fencil found it necessan 
to make many substitutions in her 
(CONTINUED ON PAGE 4) 



Miss Gladys Taylor and Mr. "Pete" 
Ingalls, Field Secretaries of the Na- 
tional Council of the Y. W. and Y. M 
respectively, visited here during the 
past week. Both the addresses which 
they gave before the students and 
their personal contacts with many in- 
terested individuals were of great 
benefit to the "Y" associations here 
n their activities. 

Miss Gladys Taylor 
As a greeting to Miss Taylor upon 
her arrival here, the members of the 
Y. W. C. A. Cabinet held an in- 
formal banquet Monday evening in 
the Y. W. Dining Hall. The tables 
were tastefully decorated and the so- 
cial affair was quite successful as the 
girls chatted with their "Y" leader. 
Immediately following the dinner the 
Cabinet, along with Miss Taylor, 
went into the parlor where the guest 
gave many helpful suggestions in the 
weekly Cabinet meeting. 

At nine-thirty, Monday evening, 
girls from all the halls assembled in 
North Hall parlor where a sing was 
held in honor of Miss Taylor, who 
gave a short talk about the work of 
the National Y. W. C. A. 

Leader Urges Peace 
Miss Taylor gave an instructive 
talk Tuesday morning in the regu 
lar chapel period. She spoke in the 
interests of creating a desire for 
peace by the medium of public opin 
ion. Realizing the force of public 
(CONTINUED ON PAGE 4) 
O 

NEW PUPILS APPEAR 

IN WINTER RECITAL 

A number of novices appeared in 
the students' recital of Monday even 
ing, February 10, in Engle Hall. The 
program,, however, was on a pai 
with all of its predecessors, each per 
former playing his particular part 
with confidence and skill. The pro 
gram was as follows: 

Two Little Frogs (Gramm) — Alio 
Richie; Morning Greeting (Gurlitt)- 
Helen Butterwick; Dancing Doll 
(Poldini)— Sara Light; March (Mof- 
fatt) — Russell Hatz; Pierrette (Cham 
inade)— Mary Grace Mills; Madrigal 
(Rogers) — Corinne Dyne; Trees 
(Rasbach), The Cuckoo (Lehman) 
Robin, Sing a Merry Tune (Newton) 

Hester Thompson; Papillon 

(Grieg), Erotik (Grieg), Birdling 
(Grieg)— Gladys Wagner; Aria in D 
(Bach)— Effie LeVan; Call Me No 
More (Cadman), Dawn on the Des- 
,ert (Rose), Song of the Robin Wo 
man (Cadman)— Irene Peter; Pre- 
lude (Schutt)— Hester Thompson; 
Finale in A (Harris) — Newton Ber 
Iger. 

The accompanists were Mary K. 
Goshert and Alcesta SHchter. 



The Men's Glee Club after much 
nought has decided to give "Gassed" 
by Bessie W. Springer as its one act 
play this year. This feature might 
be called a playlet based on college 
life and the study of Campusology. 
Its "wise cracks" and subtle sayings 
will be altered slightly to fit the Leb- 
anon Valley atmosphere. 

The cast is composed of five char- 
acters which were chosen at a recent 
meeting of the Club. Calvin Keene, 
Robert Roudabush, Paul Keene, John 
Atkins and Victor Kowolosky make 
up the cast. 

The club quartette was also recent- 
ly chosen and is composed of Victor 
Kowolosky, first tenor; Kenneth Rus- 
sell, second tenor; Kermit Taylor, 
first bass; and Robert Roudabush. 
second bass. 

The Club also announces two con- i 
cert dates. The opening program 
ill be presented in Hershey on Fri- 
day, February 28. The second is at 
Pine Grove Thursday, March 6. 

NEOPHYTES BEGIN | 
HIGH SCHOOL TREK 

LARGEST CLASS SENT 
SINCE COURSE 
IS OPENED 



TO L. Y. OFFENSIVE 



FOES MEET WATERLOO 
IN ANTICIPATED 
"SNAP" GAME 



Lebanon Valley continued their 
winning streak by surpris : ng Gettys- 
burg and winnirg 36-^-2 last Wednes- 
day, February 5. A game that was 
looked upon by the battlefield col- 
legians as one of the easiest on their 
schedule proved to be one of theii 
toughest. The Blue and White con- 
tinued to be the ''jinx" for champion- 
ship teams and topped the Bullets in 
a fast and hard fought battle. This 
! was the first home gone lost by Get- 
tysburg this year and only their third 
i defeat of the season, Penn and Le- 
| high having V umphed previousV 
I Gettysburg presented a well bal- 
anced team but the Mylinmen, led by 
Captain Albright, who was high scor- 
er for the evening w : th six field goals 
, and a foul, held a slight edge from 
beginning to end. "Jap" played Cra- 
j mer, star forward, and outscored him 

Idunng the contest. 
Heller held Hoke scoreless and con- 
tributed n*ne points to the scor.ng 
Hoke, who has been one of the high 
scorers for Gettysburg this season 
was kept too busy keeping after HeP 
ler to do any scoring h'mself. 

Stewart nlayed flashily, much to the 
delight of a large group of Y'irk 



Thirty-one seniors started on their 
sixty day trek to the Annville High 
School on Wednesday, February 12 
to take the course in Practise Teach- 
ing. This is the largest group ever 
sent to the high school since the 
course was inaugurated eight years 
ago. The number includes twelve 
men and nineteen women. 

In this class are represented twelve 
majors in history, five in English, 
four in French, three in education 
two in mathemjatics, two in Latin, 
and one each in biology, social sci- 
ence and chemistry. , The plan of ob- 
serving thirty classes, as begun in 
the fall, will again be followed this 
semester before the practise teachers 
start their instruction. The work dur- 
ing the semester will consist of as- 
signed readings, weekly conferences 
with Dr. Reynolds, observation anc 
teaching at the high school and the 
preparation of observation report; 
and lesson plans. 

O 



(CONTINUED ON PAGE 4) 
O 

DEBATERS PREPARE 

FOR MARCH 3 MEET 



FROSH OFFICERS FOE 

SECOND TERM CHOSEN 



The Freshmen Cass recently elect- 
ed officers for the second s^meste- 
The following were the successful 
nominees: President, Edward She 1 - 
lenberger; Vice President, Harriet 
Miller; Secretary, Anne Gohn; and 
Treasurer, Woodrow Dellinger. 



Both the affirmative and the nega- 
tive debating teams are now in the 
midst of their work preparing for the 
first dual debate of the season with 
Elizabethtown College on March 3. 
While the negatives will meet their 
opponents here, the affirmatives will 
debate away. 

Before the first official meet, the de- 
bating- coach, Professor Stokes, will 
have a clash between the local affirm- 
atives and negatives. 

The schedule as arranged at the 
present time includes the following 
debates : 

March 3 — Elizabethtown 

Affrmative — away. 

Negative — home. 
March 13 — Juniata 

Negative — home. 
March 26 — Juniata- 

Affirmative — away. 
March 31 — Albright 

Affrmative — away. 
April 11 — Albright 

Negative — home. 
Dual debates will also be held th : A 
year with Susquehanna. Buckne" a^d 
Western Maryland. However, date; 
mutually convenient have not yet 
been decided upon, although it is 
nuite certain that they will be sche- 
duled for sometime in March. 



PAGE TWO 



LA VIE COLLEG1ENNE, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 1930 



ESTABLISHED 1925 



|A weekly publication by the Under- 
graduate Students of Lebanon 
Valley College 



EDITORIAL STAFF 

^Esther Angstadt, '30 .. Editor-in-Chief 
jGladys Knaub, '30 ■ . Associate Editor 
'J. Calvin Keene, '30 .. Associate Editor 
jC. Alfred Shenk. '30 . Managing Editor 

REPORTORlAl. stafp 

Grace Keener. '30 

Warren E. Burtner. '30 

Ruth Shroyer, '32 

Russell Mo rgan, '3 1 

Rbt. E. Ttaudabush. '31 

. General Reporters 

Alcesfa Slichter. '30 .... Conservatory 

A Edgar Shroyer, '30 Athletics 

Hilda Hess '30 Clionian 

Hilda Buckley, '32 Delphia 

I'liilip' Barnes. '31 Kalozetean 

Robert Rawhouser. '32 . Philokosmian 
Edna Early, '31 Alumni Reporter 



business Staff 

Business Manager 



John Snyder. 7,0 . . . 
Alexander Grant. '31 

Assistant Business Manager 

William J. Myers. '30 

Circulation Manager 

.; 



FACULTY ADVISORS 

Dr. Paul A. W. Wallace, English Dept 

Miss Mary K. Wallace, English Dept 

Dr. Paul S. Wagner Math. Dept 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE. a membe 
of the Intercollegiate Newspaper Asso 
ciation of the Middle Atlantic States 



Single Copies 10 cents 

Subscription $1.50 per year 

Entered at the Annville, Pa., post 
office as second class matter under the 
Act of March 3, 1879. 



A CALL FOR CICEKOS 



.Students are frequently heard de 
crying; the lack of oratorical oppor 
tunities on our campus. They wil 
'talk about their high school declaim 
i'ng and tell of their disappointmen 
upon arriving- here and finding ora 
tory a zero entity in our curriculum 

VVTicre were those complainers la: 
year? Where are those same chron 
ics this year? Last year a nationa 
oratorical contest was launched an< 
our own Alriia Mater was eligibl 
Our forum was even chosen as I . 
center of one of the regional comes. 
In order to preserve a good appear 
nncc we had a contestant up agains 
the other collegiate representatives 
It is' quite safe to say that had ou 
campus not been chosen for the firs 
elimination, we would not have bee 
represented. However, our own con 
testh ivt ranked highly among th 
other orators. We had to have a 
ora tar and we found a good one. 
; .This year another national oratb, 
ical contest is scheduled. Are our lo 
cal orators making strenuous effor. 
to obtain the honor of being the on 
to represent us? We have not th 
slightest clue that anyone is evei 
faintly interested on our campus. 

Where are those who sigh for tl. 
high school days when eloquence wa 
in Bower? Here is an opportunit 
for those with forensic ability to come 
forth. Our own institution has as 
much chance of producing the $1500 
first prize winner who will orate in 
Los Angeles, California, on June [9, 
as any other campus. The winner 
last year was from William Jewell 
College and he competed with ora 
tors representing such institutions oi 
prestige as Syracuse University. We 
have good orating material on our 
campus. The difficulty is to arouse 
our eligibles from their lethargy int 
action. 

O 

HUMANISM 



As students in college it is only 
natural for us to question and won- 
der about religion and religions and 
the truth that lies behind them. Mos 
of us at Lebanon Valley have a 
strong traditional background of 
"fundamental'' Christianity which 
acts as. a halter in drawing us back, if 
we wander too far way from home 
ideals and religious beliefs. Still we 
wonder, and hope that we may be 
sure that we "Know the truth". 

It is interesting to note the newest 
trend in religion which is not really 



new but simply a revamping of the 
old Greek stoicism. This Religion, if 
we may call it such, is known a. 
humanism. Its exponents claim that 
man can never lie tree as long as li 
is weighed down by fear of (iod. Ma- 
must rid himself. ©f this fear by tear- 
ing that there is no Cod except so- 
ciety which he is serving. After h< 
learns this he can devote him elf ' 
that society and great advances i 
civilization will result. 

As searchers for truth we cpns'd- 
er this "theory". We wonder if' it 
feafly works and whether man would 
be really better off by throwing ov n " 
Trs belief in God. The purpose of 
religion is to e^vate man. Woa'd ! 1 
be elevated if he put ad Irs trus* : < 
his fellowmen and looked toward ro 
higher power? We wonder. Man 
must have a star to aim for if ' 
will rise at all. If h : s goa 1 of O'-v- 1 
is removed, will society take Id' 
place? Then, also, Man is incline 1 
naturally to worship. Humanisrr 
would ask him to worship society. 
Tt leaves him grasping futily for Iv 1 ) 
Tom something which has no more 
power than he himself lias. 

Present day Christianity undoubt 
edly presents many problems fo- 
questioning youth, but it also hohl 
out a great hope for both the present 
life ard the future. It g'ves h'm r 
lofty goal. If it does not reach one's 
ideals for religion, at least ve must 
search further than humanism for 
that ideal. 

O | 

SCRAPPING DEGREES 

Dr. Ray Lyman Wilbur. Se~re'arv 
>f the Interior and former nres : d "it 

>f Le'and Stanford Jun v r Uriycs'ty 
in a speech at a college r-onfere~ce 
in New York said that the fonr - e-- 
college course had served : *,s Cm>e 
^nd was gradually pass'-o- ^ir if 
Ve"c°. He said that th" A R . f1 e- 
v as a'so go : ng. He showed 

hat he understands that most educa- 
tors were not yet conscious of this ; 
'let largely because they were 
'-rought up under the fdeh that the i 
i'^ur years course was the 'dea' meth-1 
>d of education. The reason for 

]i e change is that too nvch time he | 

n: d. 's wasted on an A. B. which 
~ouhl better be spent in traming di- 

ectly for medicine, law and science. 
, o_ , 

FAUCETS (ALMOST) 

DRIP POLAR ICICLES 

Is there any hot water here?" was 
the most repeated question during" 
f he past week in the men's dormitory. 
Anyone wishing to wash, shave or 
♦ake a shower in comfort had to learn 
'he answer to the above question first. 
\ reply in the negative was the cause 
of the steady stream of figures wrap- 
ped in bathrobes going to the Ad- 
mistration building where hot water 
can always be had. 
Early last week a pipe in the wa- 
fer heating system broke, flooding the 
dormitory and putting out the fire. 
Since that time, workmen have been 
digging a ditch in order to run a line 
of gas pipes to the dorm. An auto- 
matic gas heater, similar to the one 
in the Administration building, ha; 
be en installed. This will insure an 
ever ready supply of hot water in the 
future. Tt is expected thai this heat- 
er will be functioning by the latter 
part of this week. 

Soviet propaganda is most conspic- 
uous in Russian movies. The indus- 
try of film making is under complete 
government control. This govern- 
ment uses its control for the purpose 
of education and for keeping the peo- 
ple faithful to Communism. Hence 
the movies are sometimes historical, 
showing the success of Communism 
in Russia, or they deal with the pres- 
ent day, showing the evils of capital- 
ism, and encouraging Communism. 
— F. & M. Student Weekly. 



Among Our Seniors 




MUSIC LOVERS HEAR 

HARRISBURG CONCER T 

The Harrisburg String Quartet 

l > oi 

which Prof. Malsh is a member 



a very artistic concert on T u 



RUDY J. CUNJAK 



Clash! Ah! Another heap of 
human flesh piled up at Cunjak's end 
of the line. Time and time again 
this stalwart man could be seen 
throwing the backfield men for large 
losses. From all indications and the- 
general concensus of opinion Rudy 
is one of the most consistent and 
hard-hitting players on the Blue and 
White team. 

But this is not all. Since he has 
been here, he has built up a widt 
acquaintanceship. His likeable per 
sonality seems to draw like a mag 
net a wide variety of friends. The 
high esteem in which he is held i: 
v\itnessed by the fact that he is Pres- 
ident of the "L" Club, served a term 
as President of his class and serve' 
on the Men's Senate three years. 

He is far from being an amateui 
when it comes to shooting a game o 
arrows with Dan Cupid. Twice each 
week he ran be seen traveling to Leb- 
anon to spend the evening with hi. 
"ball and chain". 

The medical profession has lurer' 
Rudy and we feel sure he will mak( 
his goal in l : fe as a surgeon or spe- 
cialist. When he has built up hi: 
profession, he can expect to see th< 
boys come around for free treat- 
ments. 



MARY E. McCURDY 

Mary, enveloped in her 'coon coat, 
is a dashing co-ed- — dashing to the 
Pennway for her "toasted rolls" be- 
tween morning classes, dashing back- 
to West Hall sometime after dusk 
when "Chubby" is in this vicinity. 
Can we expect Mary to do anything 
at a Modestine pace when we consid- 
er that she comes from New York 
City? This energy of which Mary is 
capable might win for her great suc- 
cess as a business woman — in fact 
she has already shown her executive 
ability in her bumper harvest of ad- 
vertisements for the 1930 Quittie. 

"Snapper" believes that books were 
made only for bookshelves. Conse- 
quently she goes in for the extra- 
curricular activities. Two years ago 
Mary was our "Charleston" expert. If 
she ever becomes famous, she will 
be able to leave to every high school 
in the United States one autograph 
clipped from the W. S. G. A. "date" 
books. That is as neat a piece of evi- 
dence as can be offered for her popu- 
larity. Perhaps, furthermore, Mary 
belongs to the majority who frequent- 
ly have comjmitted the sin of omis- 
sion. • 

Mary has never failed her class in 
time of need. She has always been 
ready to enter into a cage scrap with, 
an opposing class and has fought th< 
enemies of the hour with her char- 
acteristic energy. 



gave 
esday 

evening, February 11, in Fahnest 0ck 
Hall, Harrisburg The personnel 
were Harold Jauss, first violin, p^,. 
old Malsh, second violin, Hugo L 
Stoll, viola, and John Meyer, ' ce ll 

The ensemble was especially g' 
one part being scarcely distinguish 
able from another. The perfect 
blends of shading were most effectiv 
The program was composed of 
quartet from Haydn "Sunrise") 
Schubert's "Death and the Maiden'' 
and a group of lighter numbers, i n _ 
eluding the Rubinstein-Pochon, "j| " 
sic of the Sphere," and. a Mendelssohn 
"Intermezzo." 

'I'he quartet was enthusiastically re _ 
ceived by its patrons and friends 
Those attending from the college 
were Dr. and Mrs. Andrew Bender 
Profs. Campbell and Fields, Eleanor 
Kissinger, Alcesta Slichter, and Edith 
b iekls. 



-O- 



YALE MEN MUST STUDY 



FELLOV^S INVADE 

"NO MAN'S LAND" 



A flurry of dust c'oths, an extra 
supply of Ron Am ; on the windows, a 
scurry of floor mops, and a conceal- 
ment of all high'y prized trinkets and 
then — "Open House." 

The girls were in their lr'ghly pol- 
ished abodes on Friday afternoon 
February 7. acti'g as hostesses to all 
who came tl eir way. The usual num- 
ber of fel'ows displayed an intcres 
in the girls' dornitoHes and grasped 
the opportunity to be entertained or 
the second and third floors. 

Realizing the truth of the maxim 
"The way to a man's heart is 
through his stomach,'' each girl ma''e 
her room more attractive by the 
serving of refreshments in it. 

-O- 



Henry Esmond: "Many saints get 
to heaven after having a deal to re- 
pent of How well men preach 

and each is the example of his ow 
sermon." 

— Thackeray's "Henry Esmond.'' 



Yale students who have received 
scholarship warnings will not be al- 
lowed to join fraternities of the aca- 
dem : c department, according to a re- 
cent announcement made by Dean 
Mendell. "The reason for this is ob- 
vious and thoroughly appealing in its 
justice," he said. "A man on warn- 
ing is ineligible. If he is pledged *and 
Irs actual election is simply post- 
poned, the effect of the rule is large- 
ly destroyed. Also he prevents the 
e'ection of sbme other man who has 
done his job well, instead of slight- 
ing the main objective of his college 
course. It is worth noting, also, that 
a man on warning is not apt to be a 
great asset to his fraternity. The 
chances are more than slight that he 
will not finish his college course." 

— -^Westminster Holcad. 

O 



New students at Rochester have or- 
ganized a plan whereby the uncer- 
ainty of "blind dates" is removed. An 
interchange of knowledge concerti- 
ng co-eds and their ways has been 
worked out on a code basis. The 
code is as follows: A, average; B 
beautiful; K, kisses; L. liberal; M> 
mercenary; P, Pippin; R, rough; T, 
tells, V, vivacious; X, expensive; 
while the letter Y signifies the un- 
known quantity. — Juniatian. 



CLOTHING OF QUALITY 

J S BASEHORE 

Lebanon, Fa. 



COLLEGE CALENDAR 



I 

13th Star Course I 

i 
i 
i 

Basketball- J 



Basketball, 
1 dterary 



Thursday, Fe' 
in chapel. 

Friday, Feb. 1 ;th, 
Susquehanna, away, 
societies. 

Saturday, Feb. 15, 

girls, East Stroudsburg, al 
home. Basketball, Ursinus, al 
home. Eurydice concert, Wo- 
man's Club, Lebanon. 

Sunday, Feb. r6th, Y. M. & V. W 
Services. 



KREAMER BROS. 



STEINITE RADIOS 
EASY ELECTRIC WASH R 
COLUMBIA GAS STOVES AND RANGES 
RUGS AND LINOLEUMS 
"House of Better Values' 
FURNITURE AND UNDERTAKING 

328 W. Main St. Phone 6R3 



Annville, Pa- 



—Shaeffer's Lifetime Pens — 

NONE BETTER ABSOLUTELY GUARANTEED 

AN EVERYDAY NECESSITY FOR 
COLLEGE STUDENTS 

The Gift Store of Lebanon 
757-759 Cumberland Street 



HARPEL'S 



LA VIE COLLEGI ENNE, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 1930 



PAGE THREE 



)ean 
ob- 
1 its 
arn- 
and 

)OSt- 

rge- 
the 
has 
ght- 
lege 
that 
be a 
The 
t he 



: or- 
lcer- 
. An 
,ern- 
been 
The 

; B 
Ut 

; % 

iin- 
in. 




Book Review 



VOLTAIRE, Genius of Mockery 



DAiii 

% jHjiB^Sffi^^^ tC^f^^wsui ^ \ By victor Thadc 

' ■ ^f^B - ^Z^i^J ^P'^ 1 ^] ^ sic kly. puny baby was born 

^^H^ 1HI '^M^B - ^ or over a 

year the struggle between Life and 
Death endured, with Life conquering 
finally but getting as its conquest 
merely a child-invabd. However 
that same physical weakling was des- 
tined to be the "Genius of Mockery", 
Francois-Marie Arouet de Voltaire. 

The genius of Voltaire cannot be 
traced through e : ther his father's or 
mother's family. The author, while he 
is willing to accept this great mind as 
an accident of birth, does not hesitate 
to advance the idea that Voltaire's 
mother may have had a lia'son and 
the natural father of Voltaire remain- 
| ed unknown. 

rT - , a , I The boy grew up. Although weak 

Barney: Have you heard of the woman who thought Sherlock Holmes j ; n ^ his eyes were thofie with fire 

was a row of houses? ; ; n them, "brilliant mocking eyes— 

Trula (innocently): Why did she? I eyes in which seemed concentrated a 1 

! the vitality lacked by the frail body 
I eyes bright with the lustre of youth. 



"A 



COLLEGE JOKE T O CURE THE 'BLUES' " 

— Jonathan Swift. 



—LVC— 

During the Co'ed's Ope-nHouse, Earl Wolfe paraded into one of the 
rooms displaying a mouse trap. Someone ventured the opinion that mouse 
traps were obsolete in girls' dorms! Meow!!! 

— LVC— 

If all the students who slept in classes were placed end to end — they'd 
be much more comfortable. 

— LVC— 

Motto of a few of our co-eds: "Every man for herself." 

_LVC— 

, It must certainly be quite a come-down for some of our Seniors to be- 
come merely fellows looking for jobs. 

— LVC— 

The men on the first floor west believe that some day Bendigo will reach 
the pinacle of success. 



— LVC— 

Three things which are skinned to provide a 
coons, and Dad. 



college education: sheep, 



-LVC— 

Morrison, can you tell us what organization leads in the 



Stokes: Mr. 
canning industry? 
Morrison: Yes, sir, our faculty! 

— LVC— 

Webster says that "taut" means "tight." 

Frosh writes the following sentence: I've certainly been taut a lot since 
I've been in college. 

— LVC— 

Bernita was telling a bunch about the big business men in New Yprk 
who played Santa Claus for the children. What's this we hear about Archie's 
tr ving for a job with the A. T. T. Co.?. 

— LVC— 

Until this morning the latest information on absent-minded students re- 
galed a senior who took notes last June on the Commencement address. We 
now suggest for the list a senior (Gladys Knaub) who waits for 
e sophs to precede her out of the classroom. 

— LVC— 

There was a young chemistry bluff, 
Who while mixing a compound of stuff, 
Put a match in a vial, 
And after a while 
They found his front teeth and a cuff. 



can 
th 



— Anon. 



— LVC— 

^'•e following ad recently appeared in a Baltimore paper: 

Moon Touring, runs good $85 

Chevrolet Sedan, runs good $Xo 

Ford Sedan, runs $3° 



0n e of our 
* th * dark. 



— LVC— 

Freshmen, we hear, prefers blondes 
— LVC— 



because he is afraid 



^Uar 
P 



Little Sandy: Hey, Pa, let's go to the Centennial Pageant. It's only 
a Pa Sandy: Next time, laddie, next time. 



yet strangely old and wise." The early 
training of Voltaire was under his 
godfather, the Abbe de Chateauneuf 
who taught his little pupil to "ques- 
tion all authority, to doubt every- 
thing." As a small child he wrote 
rarodies on Jonah and the whale and 
other Biblical stories. 

At the recommendation of the 
Abbe, Voltaire was sent to the Jesuit 
College: the Abbe did not expect by 
this move to close the critical eye he 
had opened in Voltire toward the 
church as an institution. The Abbe 
was correct. Voltaire admitted that 
he learned "here little besides Latin 
and nonsense." 

While still at college, Voltaire was 
an accomplished courtier. His witti- 
cismls made him welcome everywhere 
Poor in money, he did not hesitate to 
use his financial embarrassment to the 
delight of his more affluent friends. 
At a banquet one night he told of his 
recent visit to a pawnbroker where he 
found two crucifixes lying conspicu- 
ously on a table. The pawnbroker 
told Voltaire that he never entered in 
to bargains except in the presence ot 
those crlucifixes; Voltaire with his 
quick wit replied "that in that case 
one crucifix was enough — and advised 
him to place it between the twe 
thieves." 

Voltaire lived in the day when the 
success of a writer was vested in pa 
tronage. Without that, the writer 
had a difficult road to break for him- 
self, often ending in prison dungeons 
Volaire hesitated to stoop to nothing 
to make for himself the friends he ex- 
pected might be helpful some day to 
lvm. When he failed to get the sup 
port of the Duke of Orleans, the 
usurper of the regency under Louis 
XV, to have his play "Oedipus" pre- 
sented, he turned to the Duke of 
Main, the ousted regent, for this sam 
support. In this play was his first 
attack against the church, submerged 
as it was beneath the ancient time 
and remote setting. This alone wa 
his safeguard against persecution 
"By making a monkey of the Paga 
pontiff, he so daringly ridiculed the 
present day eec1es : astics", writes the 
biographer. 

Was Voltaire an athiest? His fam 
OUS ep ; c poem "Henriade" is convinc- 
ing ev : dence that he was not. He was 
working against the church as an in- 
stitution under the mask of religion 
his attacks were not against Chris- 
tianity. Herein he has justified his 
aims in the lines, "To him whr 
avenges the Church all becomes leg'- 
timate: murder is just; it is author- 
ized; nay, it is commanded by 
Heaven!" 

We see Voltaire in the Bast : lle. ex- 
iled in England, spending sixteen 
years at the court of Frederick the 
Great and finding in that monarch 



sometimes an ardent disciple and at 
other times a hopeless tyrant to his 
deals, the revered patriarch of a 
model village in Switzerland with 
reedom to launch his ideas, the 
champion of the oppressed in 
France. At the age of eighty-four he 
returned to Paris after an absence of 
almost two decades, and soon fell 
into a fatal illness. A priest is called 
to the bedside of the dying man and 
he confesses his sins. A paradox? 
No, it is only the feeble old man tak- 
ing steps to secure for himself de- 
cent burial. Without this confession, 
he remains an enemy of the church 
His body will be refused for inter- 
ment in a cemetery. It is only his 
means to an end. 

"I have no sceptre but I have a 
pen," wrote Voltaire. His pen 
hanged the destinies of men more 
radically than has ever sceptre. The 
sparks of fire from his mind were 
transmuted to the written words, 
vhich were later to return into the 
flames that began the French Revo- 
lution. 

The biographer has given us a fas- 
cinating picture of this fascinating 
personality in history. The boyhood 
of the philosopher is vivdly and in- 
timately portrayed. The old age of 
he man is likewise an excellent piece 
of portraiture. However, it is in the 
maturity f Voltaire that the writer's 
pen seems to lag. Perhaps the mul- 
tiplicity of events touching the life 
of Voltaire in this period caused the 
author to lose his agility under the 
burden of his duty. The mature Vol- 
taire the world knows. It is the 
youth and octogenarian we have met 
in this book that seem to give the 
biography its value. 

O 

"Y'S" COMBINE FOR 

MUSICAL SERVICE 

The Y. M. C. A. and Y. W. C. A 
met in a joint session in Engle Con- 
servatory, Sunday evening, February 
9, when a musical program was given 

Corinne Dyne played as an organ 
prelude "In Summer" by Stebbins. 
Alcesta Slichter followed this with ? 
short reading which explained the 
value of music. Calvin Keene had 
charge of the devotions. 

Mary K. Goshert played "Au Cla ; rc 
de la Lune," on the piano. Immc 
diatelly after this, a quartette com- 
posed of Dorothy Heister, Hester 
Thompson, Paul Keene and Victo" 
Kowaleskie sang "Oh! Master, Le' 
Me Walk With Thee." They were 
accompanied, on the piano by Alcesta 
Slichter. 

A violin duet, by Alcesta Slichter 
and Frederick Mund, accompanied 
by Madeline Rife, was the next num- 
ber. Hester Thompson and Mary K 
Goshert gave a two-piano number 
"March — Militaire", by Saint-Saens. 

Newton Burgner gave an organ 
number, "Twilight Meditat'on" after 
which the quartet gave another selec- 
tion. Mr. Burgner presided at the or- 
gan for tthe songs. 

O 

An order for 150 electric locom© 
f ives costing $16,000,000 was recently 
made bv the Pennsvlvama Railroad 
for electrification of the roads be 
tween Philadelphia and Trenton, and 
between New Brunswick and Man- 
hattan Transfer. 

— The Susquehanna. 



DELTA LAMBDA SIGMA 



The pledge members of Delphian 
were given their initiation on Friday 
evening, February 7th, receiving the 
f rst and second degrees. After coin 
pleting their wa'k in life and befo/e 
entering purgatory, each girl had t 
bequeath something. What generou« 
hearted souls the freshmen proved .■• 
be in bequeathing to the members 01 
the' faculty and student body their 
soulful eyes, their way with men, per- 
sonality plus, "A" grades, musical tal- 
ent, dancing ability, etc.! 

It was an evening of hilarity and 
good time. The third degree will be 
given this coming week. 

O 

PHI LAMBDA SIGMA 



Paul Barnhart was installed u; 
president of riiilo at the regi^ar 
meeting last Friday night. He was 
sworn into office by the rearing p-es 
ident, William Meyers. Barnharl 
then installed the following office: s 
Paul Keene, Recording Secret,-- - 
Zech, Chaplain; and Rawhouse - , Cor- 
responding Secretary. 

An amusing program was present 
ed, the first number being a debate 
Resolved: "That the World is Get- 
ting Better." Dellinger upheld t' • 
affirmative side and Rawhouser up- 
held the negative. The judges ga e 
the decision in favor of the affirma- 
tive. 

The feature of the program was 
John Hughes' debut as a solo'sc 
Hughes showed himself to be as cit- 
able a singer as a public speaker. Fred 
Mund accompanied him on ti e V o 
lin, but worked under too much of a 
handicap to be heard. 



L. V. BOWLERS SEND 

BAKERS TO DEFEAT 



The Lebanon Valley bowlers in a 
return match again vanquished the 
Pennway Bakers by a big margin of 
161 pins last Wednesday evening, 
February 5th. 

Captain Rearick and Kohler shared 
honors, with Kohler having the high 
individual average and Rearick the 
high individual game. Kohler had an 
average of 152 pins, with Rearick a 
close second of 151 pins. For the 
Pennway Bakers Speck and Huey 
were the high scorers. 

Games have been scheduled with 
leading teams from Cornwall and 
Lebanon. 

Individual averages were: 

Kohler 152 Barr 142 

Rearick 151 E. Shroyer.... 131 

Hertzler 144 D. Shroyer.... 131 



J. F- BERLEW 
DEPARTMENT STORE 

Two Doors From Post Office 

Invites your inspection of 
General Merchandise 



M. H. SMITH 

JEWELER 

Watches at Lowest Prices 
Watch and Clock Repairing 
38 Railroad St. Annville, Pa. 



ESBENSHADE'S BOOK STORE 

38 N. 8th St. -:- -:- -:-: Lebanon, Pa. 

We appreciate your patronage and invite you to make 
our store your shopping place, your resting- place, your 
visiting place, and the place to meet your friends when 
in Lebanon. 

THE LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE STORE 
J. W. Esbenshade, L. V. '03 Edith S. Esbenshade, L. V. '03 
Ann Agusta Esbenshade, L. V. '32 



PAGE FOUR 



LA VIE COLLEGI ENNE, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 1930 



NATIONAL SECRETARIES 
ARE GUESTS OF "Y" 

(CONTINUED FROM PAGE i) 



opinion upon such an international 
question as war, Miss Taylor appeal- 
ed to the student body to be a con 
tributing factor in creating a senti 
ment for the Naval Disarmamcti 
Conference. The question was raise' 
whether or not there are sufficien 
grounds upon which to base convic 
tions for peace or war. 

Miss Taylor's short speech did no 
tend to force any belief for or agains 
peace pacts upon any one: person, 
but she advocated the formation oi 
intelligent opinions along that line 
Students should answer such ques- 
tions for themselves as "Do we be 
lieve in arbitration for international 
problems." It is not enough to as- 
sent mildly to peace, but student' 
should think about the problem. 

A system of peace moist be bmll 
up bit by bit, and each person car 
do his part in the mobilization of 
public opinion. 

Advice To Recruits 

The Life Work Recruits had the 
privilege of meeting with Taylor 01 
Tuesday evening in North Hall par 
lor. The subject of deputation anc 
other social service work was dis 
cussed, and several committees wer 
formed. Miss Taylor told the grou 
about the work of other college 
along these lines, and also about th 
place of life work recruits in wori 
problems, especially enr hasizin- 
world peace. 

"Pete" Ingalls 

A most welcome visitor on the cam 
pus Friday, February 7, was "Pete' 
tngalls, the traveling "Y" Secretary 
representing the National Council c 
the Y. M. C. A. Many students, anr 
especially those composing the "Y' 
cabinets, were glad that Mr. Ingall 
again took time to "look in" on th' 
Lebanon Valley Christian Associa 
tions, to tell students here of the 
work being done by similar organ- 
izations in other colleges which he i: 
continually visiting, to give encour- 
agement, and to suggest new way£ 
of accomplishing tasks. 

Besides speaking to many students 
personally, he met both cabinets ir 
a joint session and went over some o 
the plans for the rest of the year 
Problems and possible solutions wen 
discussed freely and the cabinets were 
very grateful for splendid advice 
which came from one accustomed t( 
deal with such matters. In the clos 
ing remarks which Mr. Ingalls mad; 
he cited instances to show that it i 
always the small group with a visior 
and a purpose which must go ahea< 
to face new difficulties and overcome 
them in order that the New may be 
accepted by the masses. He pointer' 
out the great need for this small 
group to work carefully, wisely, yet 
convincingly, with a real Purpose 
These very fitting thoughts were re- 
ceived as a challenge to the cabinets 
h-k1 were followed by an impressive 
prayer circle. 



GETTYSBURG YIELDS 

TO L. V. OFFENSIVE 



(CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1) 



PATRONIZE 
LA VIE 
ADVERTISERS 



VALENTINES 



A FINE SELECTION OF VALEN- 
TINES, FOR YOUR SWEET- 
HEART, MOTHER, FATHER, 
SISTER, BROTHER, GRAND- 
MOTHER, FRIENDS, Etc. 

GRIMMS 

COLLEGE BOOK STORE 



fans, and got away from the close 
guarding Gulian for three field goals 

"Sweeney" Light held Anglemoyer 
to one field goal and dropped twe 
through the cords and also added 
three fouls. 

McMillan was the mainstay of th* 
Bullets tying Cramer with eleven 
points for the highest scoring honors 
for the losers. 

LEBANON VALLEY 

G. F. Pts. 

Stewart, r. f 3 1 

Shroyer, 1. f 

Heller, c 3 3 

Albright, r. g 6 1 

7 rey, r. g o 

Light, 1. g 2 3 



Total 14 8 

GETTYSBURG 

G. F. Pts. 

Cramer, 1. f 5 III 

Seeley, 1. f 2 o 4 

\ngle'moyer, r. f 124 

Hoke, c 000 

McMillen, r. g 4 3' II 

Gulian, 1. g 1 2 

Total 13 6 32 

O 

DR. FISHER SPEAKS 

TO LIFE RECRUITS 



FROSH LOSE SCALPS 

IN CAGE SKIRMISH 



The Life Work Recruits had their 
-egula.r bi-wee.kly meeting in North 
Hall parlor last Thursday with Ruth 
Cooper in charge. The meeting was 
Segan by a short devotional service 
'ed by Chester Goodman, after which 
Dr. I. Calvin Fisher, of St. Mark's 
Refoimed church, Lebanon, spoke to 
die group on "What a Minister or 
Wssionary Should Be and Do." This 
alk was enjoyed and appreciated by 
all those who were present. 

Following this a short business 
meeting was held and the subject of 
holding services in various churches 
was discussed. The group shows a 
genuine interest and desire to conduct 
services, but they have as yet not 
been able to procure any places 
where such services can be held. 




HONOR 



Honor in the classroom was in the 
limelight for discussion by the Y. W 
on Sunday, February 20, 1919, 

One of the girls defined honor as, 
"Conforming to the rules of con 
sciousness." 

The girls took a definite stand 
against "crijbbing." The subject 
seemed especially fitting as this was 
the meeting preceding examination 
week. 



OPTICAL 




We offer 87 dis- 
tinct styles in 
glasses. The newest 
in white gold, yellow 
gold, shell and rim- 
less. 



ORffiiGRUMAN 

O f P T"O.M ET.RI/T 
4 O N © ™ ST. 



Last Monday evening the Fresh- 
men received their second successive 
basketball setback, this time at the- 
hands of the Seniors. The final score 
was: Seniors 35, Freshmen 16. 

The game from the start showec 
the Seniors to be the superior aggre- 
gation, completely outclassing the 
Frosh quintet in every department 
of the gamle. The 33's, handicapped 
by weight and experience, at no thru 
during the game threatened the lea 
of the upperclassmen. The Senio- 
center, Keene, by getting the 'tap 
off' with Bendigo, formed the nucleu 
of the '30 offense which the first yea- 
men could not break. 

Speg, the Frosh Ace, again led th 
high scorers with II points, leadin 
Rendigo and Keene who had 10 anrl 
tallies respectively. Speg was the on- 
ly Freshman hope but could not win 
the game without the assistance oi 
his teammates, who failed to scor 
effectively. Captain Zech of the '33s 
played a great defensive game, hu« 
he alone could not break up the con. 
bination of Hertzler, Cunjak, Keene 
Bendigo and Barnhardt. The Seniors 
defense lay in their offense, they evi- 
dently believing that a good offenst 
is a good defense. 

This Monday evening, February 17. 
the Seniors play the Juniors. As eacl 
team has won one game, a good tus 
sle is assured. 

Box score: 

SENIORS 

G. F. Pts 

Hertzler, f o *i 

Cunjack, f 1 1 3 

Keene, c 408 

Bendigo, g 5 o 10 

Barnhardt, g 306 

Fink, g 1 o 2 

Totals 17 1 35 

FRESHMEN 

G. F. Pts 

Buynoski. f o 1 1 

Kazluski, f o o c 

Clements, f 1 o 2 

Newcomer, f o o r 

Waughtel, c 022 

Speg, g 5 1 11 

Zech, g 000 

Totals 6 4 16 

Referee — Patrizio. Scorer — Leh- 
man. Timer — Dennis. 



CO-EDS STAMPEDED 

IN GETTYSBURG CAGE 



(CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1) 



at 



PRINTING 

When you wart work 
of the better kind see 

HIESTER— The Printer 

CHEFS 

HOUSE OF GOOD 
FOOD 

Wm. Penn Highway 
Near Annville 



Meals Served at All Hours 
BANQUETS AND PARTIES 
Our Specialty 



original line-up. 
The line-up: 

LEBANON VALLEY 

G. F. Pts. 

Clark, r. f 5 o 10 

Yingst, 1. f 3 1 7 

Rice, 1. f 000 

March, c 000 

Rupp, c 000 

Armacost, s. c 000 

Hershey, s. c o 

Cochran, r. g 000 

Fields, 1. g 000 

Totals - 8 1 17 

GETTYSBURG 

G. F. Pts 

Greenaway, r. f 10 o w 

Musselman, 1. f 4 o 8 

Fackler, 1. f 2 o 

Horn, c 000 

Smith, s. c 000 

Fisher, r. g 000 

Spangler, 1. g 000 

Totals 16 o j2 



THE PENNWAY 
BARBER SHOP 

N. M. RAUSCH, Prop. 
Annvill*, Pa. 



HW MILLER 



Annville 



HARDWARE 
OF QUALITY 



Pa. 



HOFFMAN STEAM PRESS 
ING 

KEYSTONE HAT CLEANING 

STEVE WORMS 



10 W. Main St 



Annville, P* 



PHOTOGRAPHS 

LIVE FOREVER 

Ulrich's Studio 

820 Cumberland St. 



PRINTING 




PUBLICATION. 
BOOKS, CATA 
LOGUES, STATION- 
ERY, CARDS, TAGS, 

ANNVILLE PRINTING 
COMPANY 

ANNVILLE PA. 



200 SINGLE SHEETS AND 
100 ENVELOPES 
—ALL FOR $1.00— 

With name and address — Splendid 
quality of paper 

BOLLMANS 

.33 South Eighth Street, 
Lebanon, Pa. 



D. RUSSO 

LOOK LOW PRICES LOOK 

Men's Half Soles 

& Heeels $1.50 

Men's Half Soles $i.oc 

Ladies Half Soles & 

Rubber Heels $1.15 

Ladis Half Soles 80c. With 

Top Life $1.05 

Ladies Rubber Heels 

35c Top Lift 25c 

9 E MAIN ST. 
CENTRAL SHOE REPAIRING 
SHOP 



D. L SAYLOR & SONS 

Contractors 

LUMBER AND COAL 



ANNVILLE. PA. 



RUSSEL and SPANGLER 

Our Agents At 
LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 
FINKELSTEIN 
Cleaners & Dyers 



TRY OUR HOME MADE 
SANDWICHES 

QUALITY LUNCH 

BREYER'S ICE CREAM 
A Specialty 

7 E. Main St. Annville, Pa. 



For Quality 

Baked Products 



Patronize 



FINK'S BAKERY 

Main Street 



For 

QUALITY PLUS 

in 

Material and Workmanship 
Repairs at Special Rates 
Go To 

ANNVILLE SHOEMAN 
207 W. Main 



THE PENNIAY 



OPPOSITE P. O. 



A FULL LINE OF FRESH PASTRY DAILY 




CONGRATULATIONS TO 

DELPHIAN ON HER 
EIGHTH ANNIVERSARY 




LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



PAGEANT BY Y. M.-Y. W. 

IN ENGLE HALL 
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 25 



VOLUME V 



ANNVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY, 20, 1930. 



No. 17 



CONFERENCE WILL 
DISCUSS ORIENT 



SPEAKERS PROMINENT 
IN EAST WILL 
VISIT HERE 



The opportunity of hearing three 
well known speakers in chapel and in 
the various classes on Wednesday 
and Thursday of next week, Febru- 
ary 26 and 27, will be given to the 



ETTER CHOSEN NEXT 
EDITOR OF LA YIE 




Mr. Charles Corbett 



students at Lebanon Valley. 

The purpose of the Conference is 
to give to students a world outlook 
on international, labor and socia 1 
problems. It is sponsored by the 

(CONTINUED ON PAGE 4) 
O 



TEACHERS CONTINUE 
WINNING STREAK 



MORGAN IS MANAGING 
EDITOR, BECKER 
BUSINESS MGR. 

Russell Etter has been selected as 
the next Editor-in-chief of LA VIE 
Working with Mr. Etter will be Rus- 
sell Morgan as Managing Editor and 
George Becker as Business Manager 

Although the editor elect has no 1 , 
been a previous memlber of the LA 
VIE staff, his previous experience 
will enable him to fill this position 
capably. Not only was he the editor- 
in-chief of his high school paper, but 
he has recently become a magazine 
contributor. 

Mr. Morgan, the editor-in-chief oi 
the '31 Quittie, will be a valuable and 
dependable assistant. This will be- 
gin Mr. Morgan's third year on the 
staff. 

Mr. Becker is also a new LA VIE 
member. However, his management 
of business on various occasions for 
his class qualifies him highly for thie- 
post. 

The new staff heads will select 
their associates within the coming 
week, so that they may be ready for 
the first issue on March 6. 

O 

LYCEUM CAST PEAK 

SERIES IN "SUN UP" 



VISITORS PILE 
HUGE BASKET 
SCORE 



UP 



F lextette of East Stroudsburg, 
ate Teachers' College completely] 
tr ounced the Lebanon Valley girls] 
to the score of 68-23 in a well-played 
Same, Saturday, February 15, in the 
Annville High gymnasium. This 
m arked the twelfth consecutive vic- 
r y since the visitors opened their 
season, counting among their victor- 
ies that taken from Savage, one of 
^ e outstanding colleges of physical 
e( hication i n this country. 

From the first few minutes of the 
^ ain e it was on ly a question of how 
man y points the visitors would rol 1 
g p against the home team. The East 
tr °udsburg squad exhibited an al- 
^ 0s t perfect game of passing and 
footing. Their floor work was the 
est without any question that lias 
10w n itself in this locality. The 
team could not seem to get 
fo arted ' for the Teacher's College 
powers nonchalantly sank basket 

UnT basket Hoffman seemed to be 
. Ratable 

when the ball came in 
r hands. All sections on the floor 
(Continued on Page 3) 



ACHIEVEMENT TESTS 

FOR SOPHS IN MAY 



HSun-Up," a drama presented by the 
Redpath Lyceum Bureau on Thurs- 
day evening, February 13, in Engle 
Hall as the third feature of the local 
star course, was much more than an 
evening's entertainment. The intense 
dramatic moments, the vivid charac- 
terizations, as well as the great truths 
portrayed, will linger long in the 
minds of those who saw the produc- 
tion. 

The setting was in the Caroling 
mountains, and the story centered 
on real "back-woods" life with its ig- 
norance and hate, overcome in the 
end by love. The action took plac 
in the first months of the World 
War. 

The part of "Widow Cagle", play- 
ed by Marie Pavey, was very dra- 
matic and tense. The whole drama 
was centered around this old woi 
man's character, and her relations 
with the other mountain people. Her 
son, Rufe, displayed the rudiness and 
staunchness of his type, together 
with a fine determination to do what 
he thought to be right. His wife 
"Emmy," was the kind of young wo- 
man who used the small amount of 
"larnin" she had acquired to inspire 
those who knew her. The other char- 
acters were also typically portrayed 
by a Broadway cast. 

Although the drama on the whole 
is extremely tense and tragic, it . ; s 
interspersed at times with rare bits 

of humor. 



The sophomore class sometime dur- 
ing 'the month of May will be giver, 
objective achievement tests. Tki 
Carnegie Foundation for the Ad- 
vancement of Teaching, in coopera- 
tion with the Association of Penn- 
sylvania College Presidents and the 
State Department of Public Instruc- 
tion, has undertaken these tests U 
obtain a cumulative analysis of the 
group of students entering Pennsyl- 
vania colleges in the fall of 1928. 

As high school pupils, a large num- 
ber of this group were given objec 
tive achievement tests before adm s 
sion to college and are consequently 
available for study. These tests have 
several purposes. First, it is desired to 
discover how consistently a student 
maintains the quality of his achieve- 
ment, objectively measured, in order 
that the Carnegie Foundation maj 
determine the validity of such mean: 
of prediction as are available in the 
high school or in the freshman year 
at college. Second, to have more and 
better information than now exists 
about students who leave colleges be- 
fore graduation. Third, it is hoped 
by studying teachers' rating side by 
side with scores secured by them n 
objective examinations to throw 
light on the whole problem of ap- 
praising student achievement. Fourth 
the use of tests, the procuring of im- 
portant personal information hitherto 
(CONTINUED ON PAGE 4) 



-O- 



ATHLETES CELEBRATE 
SEASON WITH FEAST 



SPEAKERS LAUD COACH 
AND ATHLETICS OF 
CAMPUS 



Following the custom of other 
years, the Athletic Association of the 
college held their annual banquet a'; 
Chef's last Tuesday, February 18. The 
event was by far the best of its kind 
in that Gordon Mackay, Sport's 
writer for the Philadelphia Record, 
was present and addressed the 
group. He particularly stressed the 
policy of L. V. in her athletics, laud 
ing the frankness of President Gos 
sard in this matter. 

President Gossard opened the pro 
gram with remarks on the ability of 
Coach Mylin. Rev. Eippel, of Frank- 
lin and Marshall, gave some enlight- 
ening information on Mylin's early 
training, illustrating his talk with sev- 
eral interesting anecdotes. OH 
Snavely, of Bucknell, an L. V. grad- 
uate, spoke on the advancement of 
football from the time he played at 
college until the present. Mr. C 
Mayer, of F. and M. brought back 
reminiscences of Hook's athletic ac- 
tivities while at that college, pointing 
out the prowess of our coach whei 
he played the game. "L. V. C. as an 
Asset to the County" was the gist of a 
short talk by Mayor Brunner of Leb- 
anon. Charlie Gilbert, although un- 
( Continue d on Pa#« 4) 



SUSQUEHANNA, URSINUS ARE CASUALTIES OF 
COACH MYLIN'S LIGHTNING VARSITY SQUAD 



LEBANON VALLEY WARRIORS LOSE GAME ON F. & M. 
FLOOR WHEN OPPONENT SCORES IN FINAL 
HALF MINUTE OF GAME 



A series of three cage thrillers play- 
ed within the week by Captain Al- 
bright and his men netted two vic- 
tories for the local boys and one de- 
feat. While Susquehanna and Ursi- 
nus yielded their scalps to the rapid 
fighting of the home team, the de- 
feat suffered at Franklin and Mar 
shall occurred in the last few seconds 
of the game when a sensational field 
goal shifted the victory into the camp 
of the Lancastrians. 

L. V. Sinks Ursinus 

.Lebanon Valley made it five wins! 
out of the last six starts when Ursi- 
nus was soundly trounced 61-44. Both 
teams deluged the basket with fielc ; 
goals from all angles of the floor'. The 
game was loosely played with litla' 
attention to guarding. 

Cal Heller collected 28 points ♦ 
add to his season's total and Captain 



PAGEANT OF NATIONS 

SPONSORED BY "Y'S' 



An elaborate pageant, "The 
Striking of America's Hour", is being 
prepared under the auspices of the Y. 
M. and Y. W. for presentation or 
Tuesday evening, February 25, in the 
college chapel. Besides a choir oi 
sixteen voices, there will be thirty 
two main characters and about •'er 
children. Many nationalities ana 
their existing economic and socia 1 
conditions will be portrayed and fi 
nally, with America, will be brought 
to the throne of "Brotherhood, Lib 
erty, and Justice." 

The pageant is being directed by 
Madeline Rife and Gardener Sayloi 
under whose leadership this new ven 
ture will certainly be successful. Fac- 
ulty members and students are invit- 
ed to be present at this function 
which is demanding the best efforts 
and time of many. 

O ■ 

SENIORS ORDER GARB 

FOR COMMENCEMENT 



The Commencement Cap anr 1 
Gown Committee, composed of War 
ren Burtner, chairman, Anne Gordon 
and Charles Fink, is making an earlj 
start to measure the members of the 
senior class in order to prevent an> 
inconvenience that might arise in re- 
ceiving the gowns. 

To avoid the eleventh hour rush 
the committee asks every senior to 
co-operate by seeing to this matter a- 
soon as possible. For their measure- 
ments the girls are seeing Anne Gor- 
don and the boys either Charles FinL 
or Warren Burtner. Fee for the ren 
♦ai of the cap and gown is one dollar 
and seventy-five cents which must be 
paid when the measurement is taken. 
W T aas and Son, Philadelphia, are sup- 
plying the gowns this year. 



Albright added 15 for his share. Ur- 
sinus used three pivot men in an 
effort to stop Heller. Young, who re- 
placed Dotterer at center, waged 2 
merry battle with Heller, matching 
him goal for goal and foul for fou 
Heller collected 15 points the second 
half to Young's 14 and thus won the 
argument by a point. 

After rolling up a safe lead, Mylin 
made several substitutions to give 
these lads an opportunity to display 
their prowess before the home crowd. 

This was the highest score Leba- 
non Valley has registered this yeai 
and was likewise the highest score Ur- 
sinus has made. 

Susquehanna Yields 

The Blue and White quintette jour- 
neyed to Selinsgrove, Friday, Febru- 
ary 14, where they subdued the Sus 
quehanna tossers by a 39-32 score. 

Heller started rolling up a score 
for the invaders, accounting for tb'.r- 
teen points out of the Blue and 
White's first sixteen points. Mylin 

(Continued on Page 4) 

O 



BUSINESS STUDENTS 
ORGANIZE CLUB 



FUTURE EXECUTIVES 
LAUNCH PROJECT 
AT DINNER 



The youngest and largest organ- 
ization, exclusive of the literary so- 
cieties, to be found on Lebanon Val- 
ley's campus is the newly organized 
Commerce Club. This Club is com- 
posed of the members of the student 
body who are enrolled in the Busi- 
ness Administration Department. A: 
present there are approximately 
thirty-six members. The organization 
is fundamentally the result of a com 
bined desire of the business men of 
Lebanon Valley to organize into r 
unit. The plan of the club is to con- 
duct its activities somewhat on the 
order of the various service clubs, 
such as the Kiwanis Club, and the 
Rotary Club. 

The first meeting was held on Mon- 
day evening in the small dining hall. 
After dinner was served, the Club 
was congratulated by Dr. Gossard or 
its splendid spirit and opportunities 
He spoke of the satisfactory growth 
of the Business Administration de- 
partment in the last four years and 
told the members of the Club- of the 
first moves to establish the present 
Business Department. He also com 
plimented Prof. Stokes, the head o ! 
the department, and Prof. Gingrich 
the professor of law, for their work 
(Continued on Page 4) 



p 



PAGE TWO 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY, 20, 1930. 



JCaBte Callegtemte 



ESTABLISHED 1925 



A weekly publication by the Under 
graduate Students of Lebanon 
Valley College 



EDITORIAL STAFF 

Esther Angstadt, '30 . . Editor-in-Chief 
Gladys Knaub, '30 . . Associate Editor 
J. Calvin Keene. '30 . . Associate Editor 
C. Alfred Shenk. '30 . Managing Editor 

KEPOR.TOSJCAL STAFF 

Grace Keener. '30 

Warren E. Burtner. '30 

Ruth Shroyer. '32 

Russell Morgan, '31 

Rbt. L. Raudabush. '31 

General Reporters 

Alcesta Slichter. '30 Conservatory 

A. Edgar Shroyer, '30 Athletics 

Hilda Hess. '30 Clionian 

Hilda Buckley. '32 Delphian 

Philip Barnes. '31 Kalozetean 

Robert Rawhouser. '32 . Philokosmian 
Edna Early, '31 Alumni Reporter 



BUSINESS STAFF 

John Snyder, '30 ... Business Manager 
Alexander Grant. '31 

Assistant Business Manager 

William J. Myers. '30 

Circulation Manager 



FACULTY ADVISORS 

Dr. Paul A. W. Wallace, English Dept. 
Miss Mary K. Wallace, English Dept 
Dr. Paul S. Wagner, Math. Dept 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE. a member 
of the Intercollegiate Newspaper Asso 
ciation of the Middle Atlantic States 



Single Copies 10 cents 

Subscription $1.50 per year 



Entered at the Annville, Pa., post 
office as second class matter under the 
Act of March 3, 1879. 



LEBANON VALLEY ABROAD 



Colleges have always banded to 
gether from the ti'me of their birth 
as distinct units in our country. Theii 
very nature forbodes this feature 
Persons were known to be college 
graduates and not a graduate of one 
particular College. The students 
moved about in the same inter-colle 
giate circles, and despite the outward 
appearance of rivalry, there has al 
ways been that inward feeling of 
"oneness." 

The same may not be said of na 
tions. Ever since the existence oi 
distinct nations there have been both 
inward and outward expressions oi 
rivalry. Gradually the world is be 
coming more democratic and nation 
are becoming more sympathetic. Like 
colleges the nations of the earth art 
being linked into one large brother- 
hood. 

At the same time the nations be 
came more broad-minded and bega 
to recognize the privileges of othe; 
nations, as well as the rights of theii 
own, colleges in this country began to 
no*tice the institutions of practicall 
the same quality which were in for 
eign country. Nations awoke to the 
fact that they possessed advantage 
over their neighbors and likewise di 
the colleges. As a result of such i 
feeling we have the desire of bot 
nations and colleges to share the 
privileges. 

Colleges today wish to extend the; 
benefits beyond their own campuses 
Lebanon Valley is one of these 
Hence, we have Albert Academy, o, 
rather "Lebanon Valley in Africa' 
which we help to support. We not 
only support that institution finan-, 
cially, but it becomes the center oi 
our interests when our thought; 
stray across the waters. 

Within a few weeks the annm 
campaign will be launched in the in 
terests of that African school. The 
present student body will want tc 
join in the nation-wide movement in 
broadening its scope by taking an ac- 
tive interest in "Lebanon Valley 
Across the Seas." 

JUGGLING COUPLES 



On our campus there is a certain 
social condition that is very poor tc 
say the least. It is best summed up 
in the attitude expressed by the say- 
ing, "The first time a couple go to- 
gether they are in love; the second 
they are engaged and the third mar- 



ALBERT L. SITLNGER 



ried." And this does seem to be the 
attitude of many of the students here 
Numerous cases have come up from 
time to time in which a fellow and a 
girl were seen in each other's pres- 
ence several times and then one oi 
them was seen with another individ- 
ual of the opposite sex. Immediately 
a lot of girls and quite a few fellows 
wondered why they "fell out with 
each other". This condition is still 
further augmented by a certain num 
ber of gossips and "dirt catchers 
who make it their business to collect 
and dispense all the news about the 
latest cases and all the scandal of 
which at least 50% is imagination 
On the other hand a person who goes 
out with various ones of the other 
sex is just not to be tolerated. He or 
she is almost ostracized for such 
flagrant violation of the time honored 
traditions of Lebanon Valley. "Sit" is more or less of a paradox 

Now this is the point we are try-" His first y ear at Lebanon Valley he 
„ 4 . . , , was a quiet, studious freshman, seen 

ing to make— Why cannot girls and 

s J at times and rarely heard. In the 

fellows here be friends and enjoy twQ s . ucceed i ng years he branched 

each other's company without being ou t and became .known as one of the 
considered in love and with prospects chief agitators of the dormitory. Any 
of immediate marriage? After all excitement beginning on the third 
. , , • , floor, east end, always owed its gen- 
there are many cases of real friend- . 

esis to .rickle . lo complete the 
ihip in colleges between men and wo- paradox he is now a staid( resp ect- 

men which are not directed toward aD l e Senior, setting an example foi 
matrimony. the Under Classmen and, as a mem- 

Some time ago a suggestion v*a£ ber of the Men ' s Senate, helping tc 

made that a "Crossed Wires Club" be ke ^> P. ro P er order '. 

He is of a musical turn of mind 
started on the campus. In an organ- Re h ^ been & member of tfae BugK 

ization of this kind meetings of a so- Corps for several years and also a 

cial nature are held. For each of member of the Men's Glee Club, sing- 

these meetings the couples are chang- | ng secon d bass in the latter organ- 

ed about so that it really fills its pur- j zat ion. This latter activity gave him 

pose of providing a chance for friend- his introduction to social life on the 

ship between the sexes. The matter ca mpus. We will let you into a sec- 

was not further considered at th> r et-Sitlinger decided when he came 

time, but we wonder if this might not h ere to let women go their way and 

be a suggestion for those who decry j le wou ld g0 his and "never the twain 

the lack of social life. There would wou i d m eet"-at least not until aftei 

be a number of details to work out he had obtained his college education, 

principally the type of program to H " s resolutions all broke down during i 

have. This would be simply a mat- t j ie past Qlee Club season and our 

ter of detail since there are now on head waiter fell hard. He now be 

the market a large number of game Heves that a college education is no:' 

and amusements that would be sun- com plete without a certain amount 

able. It would probably be well to Q f soc j a i training. We now under- 

either restrict the membership or stand triat he is considering finishng 
ave a number of the Clubs so as to ministerial studies at Yale Divin- 

avoid a too bulky organization. A | ty j n order to be closer to his "dream 

group of this type would afford the girl". Which proves the old adage 

opportunity of social development t h a t "When they fall " 

A'ithout the fear of being thought a 




BLANCHE COCHRAN 



Ever since Blanche arrived on this 
campus she has been in the lime- 
light. Going out for basketball her 
freshman year she made the varsitj 
squad for guard position. By this 
time she has gained for herself a k 
cal reputation as our own star guaru 
and is the menace that is well known 
to many of our collegiate opponents 
This year Blanche is captaining the 
varsity squad, an honor merited by 
her after three past years of splen 
did cage work. 

Blanche's one ringing qualiuy; in 
previous years was her hearty laugh. 
Throughout noisy hours (as well as 
quiet hours, occasionally) one coult 
hear her laughter and knew that 11 
that particular quarter of the "dorm' 
a group of like-minded individuals 
were making merry under Blanche's 
leadership. This year the burden oi 
being a senior, a practise teacher, r 
biology assistant, and basket bah 
captain inclined Blanche to serious- 
ness and silence. Seldom is her re 
sounding laugh of other years hearc 
now. 

Her ambition at present is to be 
a classroom teacher. If teach Blanche 
insists upon doing, one would prefe. 
to see her expounding in a "gym" 
That seems the natural environment 
for Blanche. 



COLLEGE CALENDAR 




Friday, Feb. 21, Basketball games- 
I Girls' vs. Albright, away; £ I 
vs. Albright, away. Meeting J 
Literary Societies. 
I Saturday, Feb. 22— Delphi an 
I Eighth Anniversary i n Engl c 

Hall at 8 P. M. 
a Sunday, Feb. 23— "Y" meetings. 
"Tuesday, Feb. 25— First Horn, 
Debate; "Y" Pageant; L. \ 
Negative vs. L. V. Affirmative. 
Wednesday, Feb. 26— Basketbal 
game, L. V. vs. Muhlenberg, a * 
home. 

Thursday, Febfl 27 — Girls' Basket 
ball vs. Gettysburg, at home. 

aaisssisiaigsEiM^^ 
AUXILIARY HOLDS 

BIRTHDAY PARTY 



The Ladies' Auxiliary of Lebanon 
Valley College met in their month- 
ly gathering in North Hall Parlor on 
February 13, 1930. Every February 
they have a unique custom of ho'd- 
ing a birthday party, and it i s th* 
birthday party not only of one mem- 
ber, but every memiber of the Aux- 
iliary brings her pennies for the 
years she is young. This year about 
fifty ladies had a different birthday 
but everyone of them celebrated it on 
February 13. 

The parlor was decorated in honor 
of that very popular Saint Valentine 
Huge red hearts, with the ever pres- 
ent Cupid, hung from the walls and 
lent a rather glamorous and romantic 
air to the festivity. 

Mrs. M. A. Meyer presided v 
president in the absence of Mrs. Gos- 
sard. A very delightful and enter- 
taining program was enjoyed by the 
Auxiliary ladies. Mary K. Goshen 
as first one on the program played a 
lilting piano number which won 
much applause. The guests next 
heard Mrs. Mills sing one of her fav- 
orites as only she can give it. Helen 
Kreider favored wi'th a reading which 
was well-received. Mary Grace Mills 
followed this with a piano solo. Aftei 
the number Madeline Rife sang a de 
lightful song. June Gingrich brought 
the talented and varied program to a 
■very successful end by giving a vio- 
lin solo. 



'molly coddle" or "flirt", as the case 
nay be, which does keep many f el 
ows and girls apart. Let's think it 
over. 

-O- 



BEYOND THE CAMPUS 



REDUCING NAVIES 

The most important item in 'the 
world news today is the London Con- 
erence which convened in London, 
England, January 21. This confer-i 
ence has assembled with the purpose 
of considering the reduction of naval 
strength, looking to the abolition of 
war. It is attempting to obtain re- 
duction and perhaps eventual aboli- 
tion of battle ships and submarine; 
and the establishment of' ratios as 
the basis for the future relative 
strength of the great navies. Pre- 
vious to the Conference parity was 
accepted for the navies of the United 
States and Great Britain. Now Italy 
demands parity with France, and 
Japan demands greater relative 
strength in cruisers than in battle 
ships. Another question which arises 
s whether the limitations should be 
on a basis of tonnage or ship classi- 
fication. Thus far only the founda- 
tions for agreement have been laid in 
the Conference, but great hopes are 
held for the future. 



n 

READERS EVALUATE 

IRISH ROMANTICIST 



In their regular bi-monthly gath- 
ering the Readers Club met in North 
Hall parlor, Wednesday evening, Feb 
ruary 19. 

The fascinating life and works of 
Don Byrne provided the subject of 
the evening for the readers. In a 
very comprehensive and thorough 
manner, Anne Gordon compared 
Bryne's "Messer Marco Polo" with 
O'Neill's "Marco Millions." Ruth Lil 
ler gave an entertaining summary o 
"Hangman's House", one of Byrne's 
well-known novels. "Blind Rafferty,' 
another novel of the delightful Irish 
writer, was the next in line for dis- 
cussion and Edward Shelengberge'r 
gave an excellent report of this 
charming piece of work. Elizabeth 
Keister followed this with remarks 
on "Changeling" a volume of short 
stories by Byrne. 

After these special contributions, 
the other members of the Club all 
helped in making it a "Byrne" even- 
ing and at the close of the meeting 
everyone present voted Byrne a most 
delightful and entertaining author. 



E. J. SNAVELY AND COMPANY 

UMBRELLAS, LUGGAGE and SPORTING GOODS 
ATHLETIC EQUIPMENT 
628 Cumberland St. 
LEBANON. PENNA. 



CLOTHING OF QUALITY 



J S BASEHORE 



Lebanon, Pa. 



KREAMER BROS. 



STEINITE RADIOS 
EASY ELECTRIC WASHER 

COLUMBIA GAS STOVES AND RANGES 
RUGS AND LINOLEUMS 

"House of Better Values" 
FURNITURE AND UNDERTAKING 

328 W. Main St. Phone 6R3 



Annville, P?: 



Shaeffer's Lifetime Pens — 

NONE BETTER ABSOLUTELY GUARANTEED 

AN EVERYDAY NECESSITY FOR 
COLLEGE STUDENTS 

The Gift Store of Lebanon 
757-759 Cumberland Street 



HARPEL'S 



ry 

non 
lth- 

on 
lary 
oli- 

the 
eni- 

lUX- 

the 
>out 
day 



>nor 
tine 
res- 
and 
ntic 

jOS- 

lter- 
tiie 
hen 
id a 
won 
next 
fav- 
elen 
hich 
Uh 
iftei 
de 
light 
to a 
vio- 




LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY, 20, 1930. 



PAGE THREE 



"A COLLEGE JOKE TO CURE THE 'BLUES' " 

— Jonathan Swift. 



TEACHERS CONTINUE 

WINNING STREAK 



(Continued from Page 1) 



Fred Mund is sure that John Snyder is studying for the dental profession 
as he's saving up all the old magazines. 

—LVC— 

LATEST STRAW IN SCOTCH PARSIMONY 

Scotty of the Lowlands refused to give the last born a middle name — 
saves both the pen and the ink. 

— LVC— 



showed a well-balanced and inimitable 
combination, guards, centers and for- 
wards, quick on the passes and pivot- 
ing. 

On the Lebanon Valley team Her- 
shey and March played a good game 
in the center. The guards and for 
wards perhaps were a little "off color'' 
but nevertheless, did some good play- 
ing considering their powerful op- 
position. 

Taken as a whole, the game was 
good and the victory was well award 
ed to the teachers. It can easily be 
said that the team from East Strodus- 
burgh played a brand of basketbal 
which is not readily duplicated. 
The line-up: 

LEBANON VALLEY 

G. F. Pts 

Rice, r. f 3 i 

Clarke, r. f 2 2 

Yingst, 1. f 5 

March, c o 

Hershey, s. c o 

Armacost, s. c o 

Cochran o 

Field, 1. g o 

Rupp, 1. g o 



game by the officials. Many fouls 
were committed by both teams which 
engaged in questionable tactics. In- 
stead of a clever exhibition of pass- 
ing a rough and tumble affair verging 
on the point of a free-for-all resulted 
In this fracas Captain Albright 
sank three field goals and four fouls 
for high scoring honors which werf 
shared by»Heller who converted thir- 
teen foul attempts into ten points. 

Oaks, who substituted for Horst i 
the second half, pulled F. and M. tc 
the fore by netting eight points in 
the short time he was in the game. 
LEBANON VALLEY 

G. F. Pts 

Stewart, r. f o o ' 

Ulrich, r. f 2 i «j 

Shroyer, 1. f 4 31: 

Orsino, 1. f o c 

Heller, c 10 8 2" 

Light, 1. f I o 5 

Frey, 1. g o ( 

Stone, 1. g o o < 

Albriight, r. g 6 31. 



Kalo held its regular initiation oil 
Friday evening when twenty new 
members were given the second an;! 
third degrees. Lester Kauffman, the 
new President, conducted the cere- 
monies. All the old members of Kalo 
nite to congratulate the new menv 
ers. 

O 

PHI LAMBDA SIGMA 

Philo met in a business session las; 
Friday evening in Philo Hall with the 
President, Paul Barnhart, presiding 
The invitation and favor committees 
or the anniversary gave a joint re- 
port. Their plan for having the in 
vitation and favor of the same design 
was approved and several combina- 
tions were shown. After some dis 
cussion one was selected tentatively 

O 

DELTA LAMBDA SIGMA 



61 
ic 
01 

o 
c 
o 



23 



Total 23 

URSINUS 

G. 

Peters, r. f 3 



Stibiti 



f. 



EAST STROUDSBURG 
STATE TEACHER'S COLLEGE 

G. F. Pts. 
1 23 



Sterner, 1. f 3 

Egge, c 

Dotterer, c 

Young, g. & c 9 

Coble, r. g o 



Strine, 1. g 2 



15 6i 

F. Pt; 
o 
1 

3 
o 
o 
6 
o 
o 

10 



Hoffman, r. f TT 

Pkafspective teachers at the last meeting in room No. 27 were urged to „ r . 

T _ i Went, r. f 3 

get "pictures that flattered", since they are often the big item in landing jobs. 

(Wonder if there'll be any '30 grads going toward Hollywood next year, asks 



1 T 



J. Dawgone.) 



— LVC— 



A stag should be called nobody's fool. 



— LVC- 



— Froth, Penn State. 



McGinnis, 1. f 

Austin, 1. f 8 

Gollam, c o 

Gerber, c 

Leese, s. c o 

Lesher, s. c o 

Ford, r. g. -- O 

Pyers> r. g - 

Slevec, 1. g 

Thomas, 1. g o 



Total 17 

LEBANON VALLEY 

G. F. Pts 

22 1 Stewart, r. f 4 6 1 

Ulrich, 1. f o 



Shroyer, 1. f o 

° Heller, c 6 

1 Fernsler, c 1 

°| Light, 1. g 1 

Frey, 1. g o 

Albright, r. g I 



Industrial statistics reveal that one saxophone is manufactured every 
forty seconds in America. Judging by the musical (?) sounds escaping from j ha |^ e g 29-12 
the broken and the open windows in Men's dorm we thought there were more 
than that around. 



— LVC— 

Shroyer to "Barnie" running out of the Pennway to catch street car: 
Were you trying to catch that car? 

Barnie: Oh, no! I was only frightening it away from this corner. 

— LVC— 

Miss X, a Senior: "Grade school children don't know whether French 
or History is better for them. Nine out of every ten don't know— yes I'd say 
ninety out of every hundred!" And she almost taught 'Math' at the High 
School. 

— LVC— 

Ruth Cooper: Are ypu going along to Phila. to see "Hamlet" on Sat- 
urday? 

Mary Ax: How are you going? 
Ruth: By car. 

Mary: You mean by street car? 

— LVC— 

Mae Fauth showed herself to be a very good boy scout when she came 
to Clio initation "prepared" — with life savers. 



Referee— ^Graeff. Score at end 



-O- 



68 
of 



SUSQUEHANNA, URSINUS 

ARE L. V. CASUALTIES 



Total 13 

SUSQUEHANNA 
G. 

Rupp, r. f 2 

Rans, r. f o 

Rummel, 1. f 2 

Palmer, c 

Dreibelbis, c o 

Gerhart, r. g 2 

Glenn, 1. g 4 



(Continued from Page 1) 



Total 10 

Referee: Musser, Bucknell. 
LEBANON VALLEY 
G. 

Stewart, r. f o 

Orino, r. f o 

Shroyer, 1. f 

Ulrich, 1. f 1 

Heller, c o 

Fernsler, c o 



1 

1 

4 
1 
o 
o 

o 

13 3 



F. Pts 
8 
o 

3 
o 
o 
1 
o 

12 3 



Albright, r. g. 
Light, 1. g 



Total 



Johnson, r. f. 
Horst, 1. f. .. 
Oaks, 1. f 



F. & M. 



G. 
2 
1 

3 
1 
1 



— LVC— 



'When th ( 



for a stunt at Clio initiation 



ie Siamese twins were called upon iu< * 

Eulalie Morton exclaimed— "Say, you, how's come you're taller than your 
sister." 



— LVC— 

0n e co-ed explained that she thought she was good looking, while an- 



otl, 



er decided her side kick's mirror must be cracked. 

— LVC— 

t . Th e latest version of the Pagan Love Song was rendered at Clio initia- 
10n whe " they sang "I love my heathen sister." 



removed him from, the game after he 
committed three personal fouls tc 
save him for the second half. 

Susquehanna's speedsters took ad 
vantage of their opportunity anc 
quickly jumped into the lead wmc 
they held at half time, 21-1S. 

Mylin made some substitutions a- 
the opening of the second half. Thi 
combination seemed to function more 
smoothly and soon regained the 1 
Heller came into the contest fo 
Fernsler and the Blue and White 
with Stewart doing the principle scor- 
ing, maintained a safe lead. 

Heller as usual was the high scorer 
of the evening, but was closely fo! 
lowed by Bob Stewart who played a I p asnachtj c 
sensational game the second half. J a rney, c. 

Rupp and Captain Glenn played a Kulp> J. g Q 

great game for Susquehanna and kept | Do or'sey, & l. g o 

the locals busy throughout the con 
test. 

The refereeing of this game was 
quite a contrast to that in the F. and 
M. game and spectators were treated 
o a very fast and cleanly played 
contest. 

Small Margin for F. & M. 
Franklin and Marshall gave Leba- 
non Valley a rude setback when they 
defeated the locals at Lancaster in ; 
bitterly contested struggle by a score 
of 27-26 on Wednesday, February 12 
Oak's field goal in the last half 
minute of play proved the deciding 
factor of the game. Lebanon Val 
ley's high scoring combination was 
hampered by the rough tactics of F 
and M. and the poor handling of the 



F. Pt 
2 
o 
o 
o 

10 

o 

4 
o 



KAPPA LAMBDA SIGMA 



Twenty new members were given 
the first degree by Delphian Literal 
Society on Friday evening. 

Following the initiation formali- 
ties, there was a very interesting and 
varied program. Harriet Midler read 
composition on why she came to 
Lebanon Valley. Agnes Coleman re 
viewed the love affairs of Abraham 
Lincoln, and Ruth Shroyer read a 
chapter or two from "The Soul rf 
Anne Rutledge." St. Valentine's was 
also remembered, several charming 
love poems being read by Dorothy 
Heister. Ann Gohn gave a short 
talk on the origin of St. Valentine's 
Day. 

O 

KAPPA LAMBA NU 



All the pledged members of Clio, 
who were judged worthy upon hav- 
ing fulfilled the standards of Clionian 
Literary Society, were given the first 
second and third degree initiation by 
CHo girls on Friday, February 15 
A committee previously appointed 
had complete charge of the ceremon- 
ies. 

O 

DELPHIANS READY 

FOR ANNUAL FETE 



Delphian Literary Society are put- 
ting the last touches to the celebra- 
tion of their eighth anniversary OVt 
Saturday, February 22, at 8 P. M. The 
cast who will present "The Truth" 
are ready for their final dress rehear- 
sal. The committees responsible foi 
the event are busily engaged in mak- 
ing this a landmark in Delphian his- 
tory. 

The society wishes to extend a cor- 
dial invitation to everyone to attend 
their anniversary. 



5 16 



F. Pts. 

3 7 



Total .... 
Referee: 
Umpire: 



2 
2 
1 
o 

4 
1 

13 



Greiner. 
Hartley. 



J, F BERLEi 
DEPARTMENT STORE 

Two Doors From Post Office 

Invites your inspection of 
General Merchandise 



M. H. SMITH 

JEWELER 

Watches at Lowest Prices 
Watch and Clock Repairing 
38 Railroad St. Annville, Pa. 



ESBENSHADE'S BOOR STORE 

38 N. 8th St. -:- -:- Lebanon, Pa. 

We appreciate your patronage and invite you to make 
our store your shopping place, your resting place, your 
visiting place, and the place to meet your friends when 
in Lebanon. 

THE LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE STORE 
J. W. Esbenshade, L. V. '03 Edith S. Esbenshade, L. V. 
Ann Augusta Esbenshade, L. V. '32 



'03 



PAGE FOUR 



LA VIE COLLEGI ENNE, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY, 20, 1930. 



CONFERENCE WILL 

DISCUSS ORIENT 



(Continued from Page i) 



Christian World Education Service 
acting through the local Y cabinets. 

The leaders that have been chosen 
are J. Vernga Tunga, Charles H. Cor 
bett and Miss Olive Gould. Miss 
Gould is a graduate of Cornell Col- 
lege, Iowa, and was for five years su- 
pervisor of a middle school in Jubbul- 
port, India. She is at present the 
Traveling Secretary of the Student 
Volunteer Movement. 

Mr. Corbett is a graduate of the 
University of Chicago. He has spent 
many years as a university professoi 




Miss Olive Gould 



in Peking, China and has traveled ex- 
tensively through Europe and Mexico. 
He is at present Educational Secre- 
tary or the Council of Christian As- 
sociations. 

Air. Tunga is a native Indian. He 
v; s formerly a Buddhist and is a 




Mr. J. Vernga Tunga 



member of the staff at Tungares In 
stitule where he has been teaching 
English. His education was obtained 
at Mahinda Buddhist College, Cey- 
lon. During 1918 to 1921 he helped 
to organic the National BOy Scout 
Movement in India. Since Mr. Tunga 
arrived in the United States in 1928 
he has been lecturing in churches 
and before many other groups ant 1 
societies. He has broadcast ovei 
WJZ and WEAF and talks regularly 
over WGBS. 

The program as it is now arranged 
is as follows: Wednesday, Mr. Charles 
Corbett in chapel; 8 A. M. Mr. Cor- 
bett will speak to Professors Steven- 
son's and Shenk's classes on "Mex- 
ico"; Miss Gould will speak to Prof 
Gingrich's class on "Family Life in 
India"; 9:15, Mr. Corbett to Profes- 
sors Light's and Bender's classes on 

"The Role of Science in Inter- 
national Affairs"; Miss Gould to 
Prof. Butterwick's class on "Under- 
standing Jesus' Attitude to Life"; 
10:15, Mr. Tunga to Prof. Butter- 
wick's class; 11:15, Mr. Tunga to 



BUSINESS STUDENTS 

FORM COMMERCE CLUB 



(Continued from Page 1) 



in promoting a splendid moral and 
scholastic attainment among the stu 
dents. 

Prof. Stokes outlined 'the aims ol 
the Department of Business Admin- 
istration, and told the Club of the 
excellent records of the L. V. grad- 
uates who have entered the business 
profession. Prof. Gingrich instillcc 
the proper spirit into the organization 
by appointing Rearick song-leadei 
Following a few songs, Prof. Ging- 
rich closed the meeting with a short, 
snappy talk on the value of training 
for business and the benefits to be de- 
rived from Lebanon Valley's Com- 
merce Club. 

The Club though recently organ- 
ized shows promise of becoming one 
of the finest organizations on the 
campus and a series of splendid pro- 
grams are being arranged by a com- 
mittee which will include speakers 
rom various fields of business activ- 
ities, who will be engaged to talk to 
the dub at their regular meetings 
which will be held each Monday 
evening at 5:30 o'clock in the small 
dining room of North Hall. 

At an informal meeting held last 
week Homer AHwein was elected 
President. As his choice was prac- 
tically unanimous, it is felt by all that 
:he Club has selected an executive of 
mexcelled merit. Patrizio was elect- 
ed Vice-President; Frey, Secretary 
and Lehman, Treasurer. 



ACHIEVEMENT TESTS 

FOR SOPHS IN MAY 



Prof. Stevenson's class. 

Thursday Mr. Tunga will address 
the chapel assembly. At 8 Miss 
Gould will speak to Prof. Stevenson's 
class on "British-Indian Relations"; 
5:15, Air. Corbett to Prof. Stevenson's 
class on, "The Present Situation in 
Mexico"; Miss Gould to Professors 
Butterwick's and Reynold's classes on 
'Indian Thought on Education" 
0:15. Mr. Corbett to Professors Rey- 
1 old's and Grimm's classes on, "The 
Chinese. Renaissance"; 11:15, Mr. 
Tunga to Prof. Stokes' class on, "In- 
dian Independence"; Miss Gould to 
Prof. Paul Wallace's class on, "Some 
Modern Indian Poetry"; 1:30, Mr 
Corbett to Prof. Paul Wallace's class 
on, "Readings from Chinese Poetry 
y.d Romance." 
The Ccnfererce was previously an 
nounced for March 5 and 6, but thf 
date has been changed to next week. 



SOCIETY PINS 
Ranging in Price 

from 
$2:75 PLAIN 
to 

$12.00 CROWN SET 



GRIMMS 

COLLEGE BOOK STORE 



4 



4 



NO 
DROPS 
USED 



OPTICAL 




We offer 87 dis- 
tinct 8 ty I e s in 
glasses. The newest 
in white gold, yellow 
gold, shell and rim' 
less. 



DR H G RUM AN 

O P T O M ET.RI/T 



PA. 



(Continued from Page i) 

disregarded, and the assembling of al 
data on a convenient and comprehen- 
sive record, are expected to aid in 
bringing education to a personally 
more effective basis than heretofore 
The reason these examinations art 
being given to the sophomores is tha. 
the student group under special ob 
servation will complete its second, oi 
sophomore, year in the spring o 
1930. The end of the sophomore 
year usually marks a division in tin 
character of the work pursued. Con 
centration, or a complete transitioi. 
to professional education, follows 
thereafter. 

The examinations will be given ii 
five different subjects. All student 
must take English and Mathematics 
Options are provided for in the fieh 
of foreign languages, national sci 4 , 
ences, and social sciences, one to be 
selected from, each group. 

These examinations should arous> 
the interest and be an intellectual 
challenge to the sophomores of L. V 
C. The final results of these Carnegie 
tests will either lower or raise the 
standing of the class, which in turn 
will affect the standing of the college 




Miss Anna B. Fasnacht of the 
class of '19, has recently annouced 
her engagement to George Edmonds 
Miss Fasnacht is head of the English 
department in the Norristown Higl 
School. Mr. Edmonds is engaged ir 
business at Reading. 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert E. Hartz, o 
Palmyra, recently announced th< 
birth of a son, Robert, Jr. Mr.' Hartz 
is a graduate of L. V. in the clas 
of '16. 

O 

STORK PAYS VISIT 

TO PROF'S FAMILY 



ATHLETES CELEBRATE 

SEASON WITH FEAST 



(Continued from Page 1) 



Dr. and Mrs. Earl Light are an 
c'rg the birth of a daughter on 
Monday, February 17. The campu 
was pleasantly surprised at , the new 
and extend their congratulations to 
Dr. and Mrs. Light. 



PIANOS 

PLAYER PIANOS 

PLAYER ROLLS 
VICTOR RADIOS 

VICTROLAS 

VICTOR RECORDS 
SHEET MUSIC 

Miller Music Store 

738 Cumberland Street 
Lebanon, Pa. 



CHEFS 
HOUSE OF GOOD 
FOOD 



Wm. Penn Highway 
Near Annville 



Meals Served at All Hours 
BANQUETS AND PARTIES 
Our Specialty 



accustomed to public speaking, added 
a few words. "Hooks" Mylin, act- 
ing as toastmlaster, gave the audienc 
the annual line of wit, and was a sue 
cessful medium for the program. 

Among the other celebrities pres 
ent were Machart, a L. V. graduate 
now at Columbia; Bream, coach a' 
Gettysburg; Metoxin, another L. V 
graduate now teaching at Y. C. 1. 
Holstrom, coach at Muhlenburg; An 
Mylin, Superintendent of Schools ol 
Lancaster County; Harvey and Ells- 
worth Nitrauer, Frock, Harold Fox 
Starr, Lester Miller, Peiffer, and Hoy 
all L. V. graduates; Mr. Dotter, of 
the Annville High School; Mr. Engle 
President of the board of trustees 
and the members of the athletic coun- 
cil. In addition, all of the presen 
college athletes were present. A- 
usual, the banquet of turkey and ac- 
cessories satisfied. 



PRINTING 



When you want work 
of the better kind see 

HIESTER-The P rinter 



Pine assortment of Watches, Rings 

Chains, & etc. 
New Century Chiming Grandfather 
Clocks 

LIGHT'S JEWELRY STORE 
51 West Main St. 



HW MILLER 



Annville 



HARDWARE 
OF QUALITY 



Pa. 



PHOTOGRAPHS 

LIVE FOREVER 

Ulrich's Studio 

820 Cumberland St. 



200 SINGLE SHEETS AND 
100 ENVELOPES 
—ALL FOR $1.00— 

With name and address — Splendid 
quality of paper 

BOLLMANS 

33 South Eighth Street, 
Lebanon, Pa. 



D. RUSSO 

LOOK LOW PRICES LOOK 

Men's Half Soles 

& Heeels $1.50 

Men's Half Soles $1.00 

Ladies Half Soles & 

Rubber Heels $1.15 

Ladis Half Soles 80c. With 

Top Life $1.05 

Ladies Rubber Heels 

35c Top Lift 25c 

9 E MAIN ST. 
CENTRAL SHOE REPAIRING 
SHOP 



D. L BAYLOR & SONS 

Contractors 

LUMBER AND COAL 

ANNVILLE. PA. 



PRINTING 

PUBLICATION. 
BOOKS, CATA 
LOGUES, STATION- 
ERY, CARDS, TAGS, 

ANNVILLE PRINTING 
COMPANY 

ANNVILLE PA. 




RUSSEL and SPANGLER 

Our Agents At 
LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 
FINKELSTEIN 
Cleaners & Dyers 

TRY OUR HOME MADE 
SANDWICHES 

QUALITY LUNCH 

BREYER'S ICE CREAM 



A Specialty 



7 E. Main St. 



Annville, Pa. i 



For Quality 

Baked Products 

Patronize 

FINK'S BAKERY 

Main Street 



For 

QUALITY PLUS 

in 

Material and Workmanship 
Repairs at Special R ateS 
Go To 

ANNVILLE SHOEMAN 
207 W. Main 



— Just So You Know — 
OUR REGULAR SUPPER IS ONLY 

50 CENTS 
THE PENNIAY 

opposite p. o. 
A FULL LINE OF FRESH PASTRY DAILY 




SUCCESS TO THE 
INCOMING LA VIE 
STAFF 




it Callttie me 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



"DOUBLE HEADER" 
WITH ALBRIGHT ON 
MARCH 5 



VOLUME V 



ANNVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 1930. 



No. 18 



SPEAKERS CONVERSANT WITH ORIENTAL j 
QUESTIONS GIVE STUDENTS WORLD OUTLOOK; 

LOCAL CONFERENCE BRINGS CAMPUS IN CONTACT 
WITH SOCIETY, ECONOMICS AND 
ART OF EASTERN COUNTRIES 



EDITOR NAMES NEW 

STAFF ASSOCIATED 



1 The history of Lebanon Valley was 
again in the making when a confer- 
ence was held on the campus Wed- 
nesday and Thursday, February 2b 
and 27, and the classes and chapel 
exercises turned over to the visiting 
lecturers during this period. 

The three speakers who were the 
conference guests of honor, were al. 
thoroughly acquainted with the past 
and present of the Orient and knew 
their subjects so thoroughly as to 
venture predictions for the future. 
This is the first time, at least in the 
memory of present students, ' that 
such a conference was held locally. 
The Y. W. C. A. and Y. M. C. A 
cabinets who were responsible for 
the conference, secured the speakers 
through the cooperation of the Christ- 
ian World Education Service. 
Classes Hear Speakers 

The two day conference was heid 
almost entirely through the meduim 
of the class-rooms. The faculty co- 
operated heartilly with the students 
by turning over certain of their 
sceduled class periods to discussions 
which were led by the visiting speak 
ers. 

Miss Olive Gould, who has spent 
much of her life in India, talked about 
Indian life, philosophy, and poetry i 
most of her short talks. She spoke 
of the relationship of India to the 
outside world, of Indian education 
and literature and of the personal or 
family life of the Hindu. Her talks 
were both interesting and benifiicial 



ALBRIGHT VICTOR 
IN CLOSE CONTEST 



VINGST IS LEBANON 
VALLEY'S HIGH 
SCORER 



The new LA VIE staff, which as- 
sumes its duties with the next issue 
is now complete with the exception 
of the four society correspondents. 
These will be named by the respec- 
tive societies within the next few 
days. 

Working with the editor-in-chief 
and managing editor, Messrs. Etter 
and Morgan respectively, will be 



DELPHIAN EIGHTH ANNIVERSARY PROVES 
ONE OF SCHOOL YEAR'S BIGGEST KYMS 



CLYDE FITCH'S DRAMA "THE TRUTH" WITH NOTABLE 
CAST IS PEAK OF SOCIETY'S 
CELEBRATION 



to all who heard them, for they 
brought to light some of the matters 

regarding India which had not been ' j> uth u\\ tr anc j Robert Roudabush as 
realized before by most of the listen- 1 ass0 ciate editors. Hilda Buckley : 
ers - ! Madeline Sheddy, Ruth Shroyer, Rob- 

Mr. Charles H. Corbett spoke to' ert Eshelman, and Walter Krum- 
the students on Science, on Chinese beigel, are appointed to the gen- 
and Mexican life, and presented in- eral reportorial staff. The special 
timately the history of the Far East correspondents are: Athletics, Robert 
during the last half century. He re- Rawhouser; Conservatory, Mary re- 
viewed the political, religious, and Goshert, and Alumni, Edna Early, 
literary works of the Chinese and Paul Keen will work with the bus- 
also described their present attitude iness manager, George Becker, as his 
towards the outer world. He also assistant. The circulation depart 
spoke of some of the present day at- ment will be in charge of Charles 
fairs of Mexico. His past experiences Weiss. 

gathered while traveling about the O 

rTaft , h r My tor discussio " 5 BALTIMORE ALUMNI 

Mr. Vernga Tunga, a native Indian, 
spoke of his own people. His atti- 
tude towaid religion was very inter- 
esting. He told much about the j 
philosophy of his people and about 
many of their so-called superstitions. 1 
He discussed at some length the pert- DR. 
inent subject at present of India's re 



MEET TO ORGANIZE 



The girls' basketball team of Al 
P ri £ht defeated the Lebanon Valley 
sextette 19 to 17 at the Reading Ar 
moory, Friday evening, February 21 
J 930. It was a c ] ose match through 
°ut the game and the victory was not 
ecisive until the last minute of play 
ln g. 

Reading scored first and held the 
ea d throughout the first half of thi 
gan }e, the half ending 13-9. They 
a Sai n started the scoring in the sec- 
° n d half, but several goals by Yingst 
s °rward of L. V. C, brought up the 
COre of Lebanon Valley. The final 
* COr e ended 19-17 in favor of Al- 
ight. 

Yi 
io n 
sey 



ir >gst was high scorer for Leba- 
Valley, making twelve of the 
' en tee n points. Mosser, of Al- 
(CONTINUED ON PAGE 4) 



lations with its mother country 
England. Mr. Tunga, like the other 
visiting speakers, proved a versatile 
lecturer. Consequently it is not sur- 
prising to find among his subjects 
one dealing with Indian poetry as 
contrasted and compared with the 
poetry of America and England. 
CHAPEL TALKS 
Mr. Charles Corbett addressed the 
entire student body on Wednesday 
morning in chapel. He was intensely 

(Continued on Page 4) 

O 

VISITORS GUESTS AT 

INTERNATIONAL TEA 

Launching a new idea on the cam- 
pus, the Y. M. and Y. W. C. A. join- 
ed on Wednesday evening in enjoying 
an international tea. A formal pro- 
gram was rendered in the beginning 
which consisted of a musical selec- 
tion to represent the various coun- 
tries. Following this, Mr. Tunga, 
one of the visiting campus speakers, 
discussed briefly the superficial- 
ity of the American people. He ad- 
Vised the group to live their lives af- 
ter their own dictates and remain dis- 
tinctly American. Mr. Corbett made 
some interesting remarks on the so- 
cial life in China, while Miss Gould 
painted social aspects of an Indian 
school, especially in the celebration 
of birthdays. 

A traveling secretary of the Y. M. 
C. A., Mr. Brown, commented on the 
conference speakers and their work 
in various fields. 

While refreshments were served 
the folks drew their chairs closer to 
the conference leaders and chatted 
away. Mr. Tunga succeeded in be- 
coming especially popular when he 
began to read palms. 



RICHIE REPORTS 
PROGRESS OF 
ALMA MATER 



A large group of alumni and for 
mer students of Lebanon Valley Col 
ley who are now residing in Balti- 
more and the vicinity got together in 
that city on Tuesday evening, Feb 
ruary 18, for the purpose of effecting 
a permanent organization. Mr. and 
Mrs. N. M. Bouder of 3437 Dupont 
Avenue were the hosts of the even 
ing. 

The group immediately drew up 
plans by which they might assist the 
college. A banquet was also decidec 
upon as the special feature for a 
spring rally. Many of the old col 
lege songs livened the meeting. Dr 
G. A. Richie represented the college 
The group was enthused by the re 
ports of definite progress which 
their Alma Mater is making. 

Miss Esta Wiareheim was elected 
the president of the new organization 
and Mrs. N. M. Bouder the secretary 
treasurer. This group now takes it 
place beside the other similar alum,n 
organizations existing in York county 
and Philadelphia. 

Those present were: Mr. an 
Mrs. B. L. Hammond, M. H. Martin 
David H. Rank, Rev. and Mrs. Caw- 
ley H. Stine, Esta Wareheim, Dr. and 
Mrs. Paul R. Koontz, Rev. C. Guy 
Stambach, Mr. and Mrs. N. M. Bou 
der, Dr. E. G. Vanden Bosche, Mr 
and Mrs. Cameron Barr, Mr. and Mrs 
j A. Jackowick, Mrs. Ethel Houser 
Harnish, Mr. and Mrs. H. T. Lut 
and Yvonne D. Greene. 



The students and faculty ex 
tend to Miss Ruth Armacost their 
sympathy upon the death of her 
mother. 



The Delphian Literary Society ha; 
assed another successful milestone 
Saturday, February 22nd, nationally 
observed as Washington's birthday 
was celebrated on the Lebanon Valle> 
campus as Delphian's eighth anniver 
sary. The major event of the anni- 
versary was the presentation of "i'ht 
Truth" by Clyde Fitch, directed b> 
Miss Mary K. Wallace. 

The program was opened with an 
nvocation offered by Miss Estelia 
Hughes, one of the original charte. 
members of the Society. Miss Bcr 
nita Strebig, anniversary president, 
extended a welcome to the faculty, thi 
alumnae, and the friends of the So 
iety, and invited them to the recep 
ion to be held in the gymnasium 
mmediately following the program 
Vocal selections were sung by Mis; 
Hester Thompson. 

The Play 
A dramatist gives a cross-section o. 
ife, not usually in all its details 1 
not contributing to the plot he is de- 
veloping, but only in those essentials 
that are vital for seeing clearly both 
the surface of life and the under- 
currents. Clyde Fitch in his drama 
The Truth" had not spared his audi 
ence or readers any of the tiresomi 
details. One character after anothe. 
rants in lengthy speeches on th 
value of truth, "for what a tangleu 
web we weave when first we practice 
to deceive." It is, furthermore, not 
play that draws the curtain on the 
third scene with the audience specu- 
lating as to the final twist of the plot 
The end is evident; the changes ii 
character the audience feels instinc 
tively or perhaps by habit, as the., 



BANK PREX SPEAKS 

TO COMMERCE MEN 



occur so frequently in mediocre 
drama and fiction. Even the streak 
of humor Mr. Fitch introduces in tht 
roles of Mr. Roland and Mrs. Cres- 
pigny does not save the play. 

With such a piece of drama to 
work with, the cast displayed one of 
the neatest pieces of dramatic an 
ever exhibited here. Good plays are 
often ruined by casts, but casts can 
seldom turn a poor drama into a good 
production. Under the experienced 
coaching of Miss Mary K. Wallace 
the Delphian players actually accom- 
plished this. 

The transition in the character of 
Beckey Warden, played by Miss Ber- 
nita Strebig, from that of a deceit- 
ful, calculating coquette to a heart- 
broken, repentant woman was pre- 
sented with plausibility. Miss Stre- 
big brought to the subjective devel- 
opment occurring in her role a subtle 
insight. The change in Mrs. War- 
den throughout Miss Strebig's inter- 
pretation seemed a psychological and 
possible personal reform, Perhaps 
the poise and ease which Miss Stre- 
big maintained throughout the play 
contributed to the realism of her per- 
formance. 

As Mrs. Warden's husband, Mi 
(Continued on Pag« 4j 

MUHLENBERGFLEES 
BARRAGE OF BUCKETS 



ALBRIGHT GETS SAFE 
LEAD AGAINST 
MYLINMEN 



The Commerce Club held their sec 
ond regular dinner in the small din 
ing hall on Monday, February 24th, at 
5:30 P. M. After dinner the presi 
dent, Homer Allwein, introduced th< 
speaker of the evening, Mr. D. J. Leo 
pold, president of the First Nationa 
Bank of Lebanon. Mr. Leopold in 
his short talk presented the cardina 
requisites of a competent busines 
man. He stressed honesty, loyalty tc 
one's employer and cooperation with 
one's fellow workers. 

Mr. Leopold told some amusing 
anecdotes. He illustrated importance 
and beneficial results of college train- 
ing as exemiplified in his own per- 
sonal experience. 

President Allwein introduced a new 
feature into the program of the Qui 
by announcing that each week a 
member of the Club will be called 
upon to deliver a five minute talk 
This training will be very beneficia 
to the students when they are out in 
the business world. 



During the past week Captain Al- 
bright and his "men have won for 
themselves one of the most brilliant 
victories in the cage, when Muhlen- 
berg took a headlong defeat here. 
However, the Albright lions last Fri- 
day night brought a reverse decision. 

The speedy quintette demonstrat- 
ed to Muhlenberg's basket ball rep- 
resentatives on Wednesday, Febn)«i 
ary 26, that the aspect of a game can 
change as quickly and completely as 
this season's weather when they 
blanketed Coach Holstrom's Mules 
under a 54-32 score. 

The Blue and White scoring the 
first half was as light as the balmy 
breezes this past week, but like the 
weather at the opening of the second 
half it clianged to a blizzard of field 
goals and completely "snowed'' the 
Crimson and Grey under a decisive 
score. 

After the storm had passed, Muh- 
lenberg found that her five point lead 
at half time had been ineffectual. 

Bob Stewart was the leader in the 
(Continued on Page 4) 



I 



PAGE TWO 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 1930. 



ESTABLISHED 1925 



A weekly publication by the Under- 
graduate Students of Lebanon 
Valley College 



EDITORIAL STAFF 

Esther Angstadt, '30 . . Editor-in-Chief 
Gladys Knaub, '30 . . Associate Editor, 
J. Calvin Keene. '30 . . Associate Editor 
C. Alfred Shenk, '30 . Managing Editor 

J&EPOKTOKIAL STAFF 

Grace Keener, '30 

Warren E. Burtner. '30 

Ruth Shroyer, '32 

Kussell Morgan, '31 

Rbt. E. Raudabush, '31 

General Reporters 

Alcesta Slichter. '30 Conservatory 

A. Edgar Shroyer, '30 Athletics 

Hilda Hess. '30 -. Clionian 

Hilda Buckley, '32 Delphian 

Philip Barnes, '31 Kalozetean 

Robert Rawhouser, '32 . Philokosmian 
Edna Early, '31 .... Alumni Reporter 



CAMPUS QUILLS 



To 



BUSINESS STAFF 

John Snyder, '30 ... Business Manager 
Alexander Grant, '31 

Assistant Business Manager 

William J. Myers. '30 

Circulation Manager 



FACULTY ADVISORS 

Dr. Paul A. W. Wallace, English Dept. 
Miss Mary K. Wallace, English Dept. 
Dr. Paul S. Wagner, Math. Dept 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE. a membe 
of the Intercollegiate Newspaper Asso 
ciation of the Middle Atlantic States 



Single Copies 10 cents 

Subscription $1.50 per year 

Entered at the Annville, Pa., post 
office as second class matter under the 
Act of March 3, 1879. 



THE END OF THE TRAIL 



The 1930 LA VIE staff have come 
to the end of their trail. We cannot 
say it was a difficult trail, for we 
have only followed where others hav 
gone before and broken the road. J 
was therefore one not calling fortl 
daring but perseverance, for it is 1 
long trail with the destiny far be 
yond the horizon. 

We began as all staffs do — witl 
many aims of improving the thirty o 
more landmarks along this trail, ear, 
landmark an issue of the paper. Som 
aims we have accomplished; "many vv 
have not. We can only hope that w. 
have left the trail a little smoothc. 
for our successors. To them we ex 
tend our sincerest wishes for succes 
as they take up the task of polishm. 
these landmarks with their man_ 
jagged edges that we have passe, 
over. 



If the students persist in campn 
short cuts there will not be mucl 
grass left to form the green carpe 
for our May Day fete. With the suci 
den thawing of the earth and the we 
weather, most of the sod is now fine 
ing its way into "dorms" and A 
Building plastered to the heels of th< 
trespassers. 



A college is only as strong as it; 
weakest alumnus. When groups o 
alumni get together and organize, a 
they have in Philadelphia, York an< 
Baltimore, it means the perpetuatior 
of their Lebanon Valley identity am 
that the progress of their Alma Ma- 
ter is one of' their interest . The fu- 
ture alumni and the general observers 
are quick to notice that the prestige 
of the school is dependent in grea 
part upon the success of the graduate 
themselves receive some stimulus 
from the contacts formed in these 
oorganizations? 

We are glad to see the return of 
spring days — 'Until we suddenly 
realize that along with them has re 
turned the time to dodge the base 
balls and the golf balls that go whiz- 
zing over the campus. 



And I sat under the elm tree 

In eloquent silence that hovers ovei 

And sits by — 

And speaks to the soul. 

And you were there! 

And I looked up at the stars 
Soul-high, 

And the new moon three locust 

trees — 
Fathomless sky — 
And vastness of space — 
And reached up my hand 
And you and God were there! 
And I touched the dry earth 
With my hand; 

And the tree rustled like the rustle 
Of soft rain; 

And a thorn pricked my hand— 

And spicy breath of a rose, 

And you and God and I were there. 

O 

Two shadowy forms 
In a world of mist, 

Groping for the sun, 
Their fingers touch — 
And light at last — 

They are one! 



o 

To be alone; to be free 

To rush alone into the dark 

i'o stumble, to fall 

To be dashed upon rocks — alone; 



Anything! To be released 
Frcm this madness 
Of meaningless chatter, 
This frenzy, this white-heat 
This wild race for nothing — but 
words, 

Words that isolate man from man 
And starve their souls! 

Great God! Great silence, 
Out there alone 

Teach me to speak the Tongue 
That has no need of words 
And grant one soul 
Who understands, 
And speaks that tongue-then 
1 shall be free 
/rom words! 



r 



Among Our Seniors 





C. ALFRED SHENK 



FROM OTHER FENS 



Now that the '31 Quittie are in the 
midst of their sales campaign among 
the alumni, let's try our selling abil- 
ity on our alumni friends, whethei 
we're juniors or of another class 
Every junior class need all the boost- 
ing they can muster when the time 
approaches to market their Annual. 



ON SILENCE 

It is not mere negation, 
Nor lack for a desire 
To speak one's mind. 
Mo! Silence is, quite often, 
The quintessence of wisdom 
\nd brightly shines am'dst the blab- 
ber 

Of ever-shrieking fools. 

— }De Kubinyi. 

O 

Marsden: but we must all 

be crooks where happiness is con- 
cerned! steal or starve! 

— O'Neill's "Strange Interlude." 

O 

Every soul is a circus, 
Every mind is a tent, 
Every heart is a sawdust ring, 
Where the circling race is spent. 

O 

AT THE AQUARIUM 
Serene Ithe silver fishes glide, 
Stern-lipped and pale and wonder- 
eyed ! 

As through the aged deeps of ocean, 
They glide with wan and wavy mo- 
tion. 

They have no pathway where they 
go, 

They flow like water to and fro 
They watch with never-winking eyes, 
They watch with staring, cold sur- 
prise 

The level people in the air, 

The people peering, peering there: 

Who wander also to and fro, 

And know not why or where they go, 

Yet have a wonder in their eyes, 

Sometimes a pale and cold surprise. 

— Max Eastman. 



"Si" finishes in this isue of LA 
VIE his faithful service as managing 
editor of the college paper. A113 
Wednesday of the past year a visito 
to the Annville Print Shop might 
have seen him. rapidly running ovei 
proof and making the necessary cor 
rections or, in his capacity as first as- 
sistant to the printer, deftly inserting 
those lead slugs in the galleys. 

Shenk is very quiet but his silem 
exterior hides many excellent quali 
ties. Among them we might men 
tion his ability in History. This ap- 
titude we may lay to the effect 01 
heredity. He is also a publisher as 
we have previously noted and has 
printing for his avocation. Probably 
the talent for which he is best known 
among • the students is his artistic 
ability. Anyone who has lookec 
through last year's Annual was no 
doubt struck by the large number of 
excellent drawings, many of which 
were Shenk's. Not only is he partic- 
ularly clever at free hand art, but 
mechanical drawing too is his "meat". 

He has served a term as Financis ^ 
Secretary of his class and plays base - 
ball for amusement. Our only regret 
is that we have not had the pleasure 
of becoming better acquainted with 
him. 



BERN IT A STREBIG 



After seeing Bernita's performance 
in "The Truth", one questions vvhj 
she should prepare to teach (or per- 
haps it isn't even teaching that Ber- 
nita plans for next year — our in 
formation is scanty). This is anothei 
dramatic achievement that Bernit? 
can add to her list, including the roles 
of Nora in "The Doll's House" anc' 
of Lady Caroline in "Dear Brutus." 

Bernita's strongest inclination: 
seem always to have been toward tin 
ertra-curricular activities. In adelitior 
to dramatics, she has just led the 
Delphian Literary Society througl 
the successful celebration of it^ 
eighth birthday. Then, too, Bernita 
has gone in for this extra-curricular 
course — Campusology — which is leap 
ing to unheard of popularity at the 
present time. 

This year, with the influx of many 
freshmen in South Hall, Bernita has 
unexpectedly found a new position to 
fill. She has been one of the first 
friends many of the South Hall girl, 
made on this campus, and as a senior 
she has won for herself a large fol- 
lowing among the newcomers. 



1 COLLEGE CALENDARS 



I 

m Friday, Feb. 28. — Literary socio 
H ties' meetings. Boys' Glee Qui 
H at Hcrshey. 

1 Saturday, March 1 — Boys' Rasket 
I hall game, F. & M. at bonie 
j| Girls' Basketball game, Ursi 

I nus, away. J 

II Sunday, March 2— Y. M. atu r| 

§ Y. W. :: 

I Monday, March 3— Dual debar, I 

H with Elizabethtowri. 

1 Wednesday, March 5— "Doubl 1 

1 header" with Albright, at Leb*| 

U 11011; History Club. 

I Thursday, March 6— Glee Club a| 

g| Tine Grove. :• 
H I 

asiiaiisigisiiMigii§igiigisiiaiaiaiiiaiaiaiiiiiiiiig|g|, 

STUDENTS ATTEND 

"HAMLET" PRODUCTION 

Dr. Wallace, Prof. Crawford and nine 
members of the student body motor- 
ed on Saturday, February 22, to Phil- 
adelphia where they witnessed a very 
creditable staging of Shakespeare's 
"Hamlet." The tragedy was played 
by the Chicago Civic Shakespeare So- 
ciety with Fritz Leiber in the leading- 
role and other very distinguished ac- 
tors completing the cast. In addition 
'o the fine character delineations and 
the professional performance as a 
whole, the gorgeous costuming and 
stage devices which were employed 
were especially noteworthy. 

'32 QUITTIE AWARD 

ENGRAVING CONTRACT 



UNION FOR STRENGTH 

The seemingly impossible task of 
uniting Christian, Jew and Moham- 
medan has been accomplished for the 
first time in the history of religion. 
This union has come about in Rus- 
sia as a result of the Soviet blas- 
phemies against God. The Soviets 
ihave closed the churches, confiscated 
and melted many church bells, burn- 
ed the icons, prohibited Sunclay- 
; School and religious education fo 
children, and have even turned the 
churches into granaries for the stor- 
ing of wheat. In order to stir up re 
ligious hatred these atrocities have 
been attributed by the Soviets to men 
^of another faith in the hope that the 
Jews, Christians and Moslems would 
destroy each other. The plan par- 
tially succeeded but now the three 
faiths are uniting under the name 01 
the Society for the Protection o 
Brotherly Love. Together they hope 
to prevent the total destruction of re- 
ligion in Russia. 



SOUTH POLAR COAL 

Dr. Lawrence Gould, geologist of 
the Byrd expedition lio the South 
Pole, has discovered coal 011 M011 1 
Mansen in the Antarctic. He report 
that he had to climb 6,000 fee-t tO 
reach cap rocks. In these caps he 
found sandstone and "highly carbon 
aceous material". Some mineralolo 
gists think that a coal field may covei 
100,000 square miles of the Antarctie 
underneath the snow, but if it doc^ 
it is at present very inaccessible- anc 1 
what has been discovereel has beei 
of a very poor quality. 



NO TRESPASSING 

The Canadians request that tiiej 
please be allowed to live. This re 
quest came as the result of the rec- 
ommendation of the Prohibition forc- 
es in Washington that 10,000 armed 
border guards should be placed on the 
border line between Canada and tht 
United States in order to prevent the 
smuggling- over of liquor. The au- 
thorities at Washington also desire 
that the number of ports of entry be 
increased from 100 to 600 and that all 
people entering the United State-; 



The 1932 Quittie staff has made 
their first move by accepting the con- 
tract offered by the Canton Engrav- 
ing Company of Canton, Ohio. This 
company is doing the engraving foi 
the 193 1 Quittie and previously did 
the work for the 1930 class. Because 
of their service, type of workman- 
ship and special offers, they have been 
awarded the contract for the third 
consecutive year. George Nye, the 
editor, is looking forward to diligent 
cooperation on the part of his as- 
sistants and hopes to turn out a year 
book which will excel the annuals of 
past years. 



should be forced to pass through one 
of these ports instead of simply noti- 
fying the nearest one anel crossing 
wherever they wish, as is now tht; 
case. The proposal has met with 
much comment from Canadian news- 
paper, some with anger, some vVJP« 
mockery and some also with sym- 
pathy for the problem of the State 
and a sincere desire to assist. 



CLOTHING OF QUALITY 

J S BASEHORE 

Lebanon, Pa. 



KREAMER BROS. 



STEINITE RADIOS 
EASY ELECTRIC WASHE R 

COLUMBIA GAS STOVES AND RANGES 
RUGS AND LINOLEUMS 

"House of B etter Values" 
FURNITURE AN D UNDERTAKING 

328 W. Main St. Pho ne 6R3 



Annville, P»- 



—Shaeffer's Lifetime Pens — 

NONE BETTER ABSOLUTELY GUARANTEED 

AN EVERYDAY NECESSITY FOR 
COLLEGE STUDENTS 

The Gift Store of Lebanon 
757-759 Cumberland Street 



HARPEL'S 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 1930. 



PAGE THREE 



DN 

line 
tor- 
hil- 

'ery 
re's 

tyed 

So- 
ling 
ac- 
tion 
and 
> a 
and 
yed 



kCT 

iade 
con- 
rav- 

rhts 

for 

did 
wse 
,ian- 
ieen 
lird 

the 
;ent 

as- 
year 
5 of 



one 
loti- 
sing 

the 
with 

,vich 
ym- 
atc 



■D 




jTfT5MRSAG0 1 1 

FROM THE PEN OF 

A CAMPUS POET 




"A COLLEGE JOKE TO CURE THE 'BLUES'" 

— Jonathan Swift. 



Don't stand around a-wishing 
That things will come to you; 
Just get right in and hustle, 
There's a lot for you to do. 
There's only one man ever lived 
Whom but raven fed with bread, 
And that old timer, on my word, 
Has been a long time dead. 

So get right in and hustle, 
Don't stand around and moan; 
You never saw the crops grow- 
Where the seed has not been sown 
If you lie beneath the apple tree, 
Your mouth open to the chin, 
Don't expect the other fellow 
Will drop the juicy apple in. 



A campus wit has posted the grades in "Campusology" on the bulletin 
board. Before many of the guilty had a chance to blot out their names Joej 
D. managed to get the list in toto. Here it is: 

"Barnie": Inc. (He promises to ( improve his grade when soph rules are) 
off and the days get longer.) 

Dean Salada: E (The girl isn't always available.) 

Percy Clements: B (What a senior he may hope to be!) 

Babe Early: D (His attentions have the wanderlust.) 

Bendigo: A (It's Pleasantville or nobody.) 

"Red" Weigle: Inc. (Too uncertain for a grade.') 

Dot Thompson: A (Like Bendigo — The boy from Brown or none.) 

Irene Peters: C (Too much indifference to the course at present.) 

Mary Stager: C (Takes too many cuts.) 

Dot Garber, Eva Peck, Hester Thompson, Gladys Hershey: "A" stu- 
dents (in spite of the Vigilantes). 
Fred Mund: F. 

Heller: B (He's getting along quite well.) 
Miriam SUvius: A (Gentlemen prefer blondes.) 

Earl Wblfe: No grade as he's head of the extra-curricular department, 
with McCurdy, Lechthaler and Hertzler as assistants. 

—LVC— 

Cal. Keene demonstrated something new in smoking during the second 
act of "The Truth." And did you notice the way Dusty handled the four 
thirteens — that was something old. 

— LVC — 

SPECKS OF DIRT 

Ruth March initiated the 1930 spring as "first batter up'' in a minor 
league game played next door to one of the local cemeteries. As Ruth sent 
the balls cracking through the air, the young hopes of America routed lustily 
for "Babe Ruth." 

— LVC— 

Coach Fencil and Blanche Cochran spent Saturday afternoon on the hill 
cemetery reading epitaphs. Hovis, visiting alumnus, and Olive Morrow like- 
wise planned to study epitaphs at the same time. However, they changed 
'their minds quickly when they saw they could not have all the tombstones 
to themselves and plunged onward over the muddy hill. 

— LVC— 

FROM BIBLE 14 BLUE BOOKS 

One frosh enlightens on the engineering in the days of Christ: "Christ 
w as tempted to climb a high steeple and then have an angle come and hold 

him -" 1 : \ n . 1 jaU 

Another green-capped youngster gives his idea of medicine: "Jesus was 
los t and his mother found him again conversing with doctors who were as- 
tounded at his medical knowledge." 



Whatever is worth having 
You've got to hustle for, 
■ If you have a little money, 
I You should hustle to get more. 
If you want to win a lady, 
Don't lie around and sigh, 
Just get a hustle on you 
You'll catch them on the fly. 



My boy, you've got to hustle 
From the cradle to the grave; 
The battle is an easy one 
If you'll hustle and be brave, 
But if you're tired and lazy 
The world will pass you by; 
You'd better find a nice soft spot 
And lay you down and die. 

— From "College News." 
O 

JUNIORS OUTPLAYED 

IN SENIOR SCRAP 



SOCIETY PROGRAMS 

The following were the society 
programs for the meetings held Feb 
14, 1019: 

Clio 

A piano solo opened the program 
followed by a very clever reading. 
After this came the presentation o 
current events. The last number wa 
a vigorous discussion on the ques- 
tion "Should the College Authorities 
Take Charge of Athletics?" 

Philo 

The first number was a talk 01 
"Germany, a Conservative Republic. 
A reading and an extemporaneou 
speech on harmony followed. This 
^roup also closed their program wit 
a well handled debate, "Resoloved 
That the German-African Colonie 
Should Remain In the Hands of tit 
Allies." 

Kalo 

Characteristics of Theodore Roose 
velt given by one of the members wa 
very enlightening. A vocal solo the 
preceded a spirited discussion o 
"Should Women Have the Right t 
Vote in Pennsylvania?" It is inter 
esting to note that although the a 
firmative side of the debate won off 
cially, the audience decided in favor 
of the negative. 

O • 

RECRUITS MEET FOR 

VITAL DISCUSSION 



PROGRAM HEADLINERS 

ARE CLIONIAN FROSH 



The freshman members of CHo 
proved their ability as entertainers 
when they had complete charge of the 
program on Friday night. 

The humorous side of the enter- 
tainment was featured in a skit "Tlu 
Last Rehearsal", directed by Kath- 
erine Lutz. Jane Muth in an imper- 
sonation of Winnie Lightner and 
Ruth Coble in a caricature of Pado: - 
ewski won much applause from th 
upper classmen. Mae Fauth and 
Kathryn Gockley, "made up" as dark- 
jes, contributed some good jokes 
made more interesting by plenty ci 
local color. 

The more artistic numbers of the; 
proogram, included a solo by Kath- 
erine Lutz, a duet by Ruth Coble and 
Dorothy Hartz, and a quartette l>j 
Miriam Silvius, Katherine Lutz, Ru;i 
Coble and Jane Muth. 

O 

: Sir Peter: We all live on our il- 
lusions. The more we believe, the 
happier we are. 

Parker's "Pomander Walk." 



-LVC- 



'Pass your re-exam,?" 
'It was this way — " 
"Neither did I. Shake. 



-LVC— 



^Why the black crepe on the door? Is your roommate dcad. J " 
That's no crepe, that's the roommate's towel." 

— LVC— 

"Down, Fido," said Taylor as he swallowed the hot dog. 

— LVC— 

As 



^ s this issue went to press, the 1930 LA VIE staff took their places so 
^ nl y at the foot of the ladder waiting their turn to climb to the top. 
J a y task, '*Do |they think it is their right to ascen 

U y el s and success awaiting at the top." Ah, no, dear critic 
52 th *ir turn to be put on the shelf beside the other dusty, superannuated 
a s - Tl iey must make way for the newcomers. 



id now to the traditional 
They only 



The Juniors bowed to the Seniors 
in their first basketball defeat of the 
current season last Thursday even 
ing when their elders walked awa} 
with the score 34" 2 6- 

The game started with a snap, anc 
for the first few minutes the Junior 
held the upper hand due to the work 
of Wood. It was not to be for long 
as Barnhart and Hertzler began cut 
ting in and running up two-pointers 
which wrecked the Junior lead. The 
Juniors then closed up and staged 
rally which succeeded in bringing 
them within one point of tying thei 
opponents at the end of the first half 
the score being 11-10. 

The second half started more slow- 
ly. The Seniors repeatedly securec 
the tap-off, but usually waited unti 
the Juniors had organized their de 
fense before doing anything. Th< 
Seniors opened a devastating long 
range bombardment from the middle 
of the court. Cunjack led these fire 
rorks with three "buckets" from the 
opponents' foul line. The Junior 
were seldom in the game after that 
Occasionally they threatened, bm 
Senior field goals always obliteratec 
their threats. 

The second half also featured 
"bone crushing" by both teams, with 
the result that four men left the game 
on personal fouls. Referee Light 
serves much commendation for 
work with the whistle. 

The next game is the Frosh vs 
Juniors engagement. Due to their two 
defeats the first year men are the 
under-dogs, but even under-dogs car 
bite. Admission, one-tenth of one 
simoleon. 

O 

JAZZ 

Trombones and ukeleles, 
Flutes, drums, a broken pan; 

A yell, a scream, a ghastly shout 

Yes, that is jazz! 
Rut do not mind it, 
Sunshine follows 



At the meeting of the Life Recruit' 
on Thursday evening in North Hal 
Parlor, Ray Harris gave a report c- 
Pentecost in Prayer and Ruth Coble 
reported on Pentecost in Evangelism 
After these reports there was a dis 
cussion group. 

The Life Recruits have purchased a 
book entitled Reports of Jerusalem 
Conference which will serve them a-; 
a reference to world problems. 

O 

STUDENTS BROADCAST 

FROM HARRISBURG 



de 
hh 



Miss Alcesta Slichter and Miss 
June Gingrich were participants in a 
program of violin and piano music 
which was broadcast by pupils of Pro- 
fessors Harold Malsh and Dewitt 
Walters from station WCOD, Har- 
risburg, Monday evening, February 
24. A four part violin ensemble fur 
nished the main part of the program 
with a nine year old piano student o 
Prof. Walters as piano soloist, anc 
Alcesta Slichter, violinist. Both Miss 
Slichter and Miss Gingrich played it 
the ensemble. Reports have come in 
that the broadcast was well received 



Y. W. NOTES 

The program of the Y. W. Friend- 
ly Hour of Sunday evening, February 
23, was given entirely by members o\ 
the Senior class, with Corinne Dyne 
as leader. Talks and discussions or 
Washington and Lincoln made up 
the main part of the program. An 
interesting feature was the debate 
"Resolved, That Washington was 
greater than Lincoln." Special mu- 
sic was furnished by a quartet sing- 
ing Kipling's "Lest We Forget 
a vocal solo by Helen Hain, 
Everlasting Hills" by Nevin. 

Other class programs will follow 
the near future. 



f 



f 



NO 
DROPS 
USED 



OPTICAL 




We offer 67 dis- 
tinct styles in 
glasses. The newest 
in white gold, yellow 
gold, shell and rim- 
less. 




SOCIETY PINS 
Ranging in Price 

from 
$2.75 PLAIN 

to 

$12.00 CROWN SET 



GRIMMS 

COLLEGE BOOK STORE 



, anc 
"Th, 



J. F BERLEI 
DEPARTMENT STORE 

Two Doors From Post Office 

Invites your inspection of 
General Merchandise 



M. H. SMITH 

JEWELER 

Watches at Lowest Prices 
Watch and Clock Repairing 
38 Railroad St. Annville, Pa. 



thunder. 
— De 



Kubinyi. 



ESBENSHADE'S BOOK STORE 

38 N. 8th St. -:- -'- Lebanon, Pa. 

We appreciate your patronage and invite you to make 
our store your shopping place, your resting place, your 
visiting place, and the place to meet your friends when 
in Lebanon. 

THE LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE STORE 
J. W. Esbenshade, L. V. '03 Edith S. Esbenshade, L. V. 
Ann Augusta Esbenshade, L. V. '32 



'03 



PAGE FOUR 



LA VIE COLLEGI ENNE, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 1930. 



MUHLENBERG FLEES 

BARRAGE OF BUCKETS 

(Continued from Page i) 



Lebanon Valley attack the second 
half, and aided by pretty passes from 
his teammates, sank eight field goals 
in quick succession. Captain Albright 
and Heller snapped into life this can- 
to and evaded their opponents to 
score four and three field goals re-, 
spectively. 

The whirlwind offense of the Blue 
and White was so effective in the 
second half that Muhlenburg wab 
only able to garner three goals iron, 
the field, two of which were long 
shots. For the first time this yeai 
the Blue and White showed that the> 
could change from a hopeless exhi- 
bition of basketball to a brand thai 
is unbeatable by any team in the 
country. In the last ten minutes o. 
play the crowd was kept on edge b) 
the brilliant passing and shooting o 
the Blue and White. This superfine 
exhibition gave the local supporters 
supreme confidence in the team s a- 
bility to finish the season successfully. 

For the losers Heffner was higK 
scorer and Wackernagh, Ulrich ana 
Captain Smith were the main scor- 
ing threats. 



DELPHIAN ANNIVERSARY 
PROVES BiU liViiaMi 

(Continued from i J age i ) 



Lebanon Valley 


G. 




F. 


P. 


Stewart 


rf. 


9 


o 


rfc 


Bartolet 


rf. 


o 





o 


Shroyer 


If. 


2 


o 


4 


Ulrich 


If. 


2 


o 


$ 


Heller 


c. 


4 


I 


9 


Light 


lg. 


I 


I 


3 


Albright 


rg- 


6 


4 


IG 


Total 




24 


6 


54 


Muhlenburg 


G. 




F. 


Jfi 


Heffner 


rf. 


3 


5 


i , 


O'Brien 


rf. 


I 


o 




VYackernagle 


If. 


3 


2 


S 


Carney 


If. 


o 


o 


o 


Lauck 


c. 


I 







Ulrich 


lg- 


2 


I 




Kratzer 


lg- 


O 


I 




Smith 


rg- 








r I otal 




n 


10 




I efree: Bover; 


Lancas 









Albright Conquers 

The ancient rivals, Albright am 
Lebanon Valley, had their first 'meei 
ing on the court last Friday nigin 
February 21, with Albright mump., 
ing in the decisive win 43"3 2 - 

The game was played on the Read 
ing Armory floor. The Blue ant. 
White had considerable trouble mak 
ing- their shots against a glass bacn. 
board while the Albright colleg'.am 
were right at home in making the., 
shots count. 

Heller opened the game with a fou 
which was quickly followed by a field 
goal for Lebanon Valley. The Lions 
came right back and scored sevei. 
points. Lebanon Valley called time 
At the end of the brief intermissio; 
they played a different brand of bas- 
ketball and jumped to a 15-7 leacl 
Coach Mylin at this point made sev- 
eral substitutions and Albright rollet 
up ten points, to lead at half tirm 
17-15. 

The second half both teams bat 
tied furiously on even terms for tlu 
first ten minutes. The Blue and 
White at this juncture of the ganu 
Slowed up a bit and Albright, led by 
Karlip, sensational guard, jumped in- 
to a safe lead and were not headec 
thereafter. 

Heller and "Jap" Albright were tin 
main threats for Lebanon Valley 
While Firing, Haines and Karlip did 
the devastating work for the victors 

The rivals meet in a return en 
gagement on the Lebanon High flooi 
Wednesday, March 5. when "Jap' 
Albright and his teammates promise 
the invaders a heated contest. 



Calvin Keene was the credulous 
gentleman with dramatic nicety 
However, when his credulity rlees 
upon learning of his wile's deceit, in* 
emotions seemed to lack the ade- 
quate sparks. 

The role of Mrs. Lindon who seems 
a bundle of excited nerves was piay 
ed by Lva Peck. Miss J^ecK suua. 
the golden mean in her emotional in- 
terpretation and kept the roie wuim. 
the realm of naturalness. 

In contrast with tliese character 
of the more refined walk 01 nie Wci» 
Mr. Rohland, the paras.tic father o. 
Mrs. Warden, and Mrs. urespigti} 
his landlady. Miss rruia Kock mam 
tested her dramatic possibilities 11. 
this difficult character.zaton. Aili 
Khoades, likewise, gave a tine piece 01 
acting in his character roie. 

the other members 01 die cas. 
were Misses Mary i^iizabetli bte 
Lhens and Dorothy Forry and 
Lviessrs. Gardner bayior and Ciarence 
Early. 

Alter the play, the gymnasium be 
came the renuezvous tor the Del- 
phians and their friends. It was ap- 
propriately decorated with tree 
branches from winch hung cherries 
and hatchets. George Washington's 
picture was above the entrance in the 
place of! honor. The success ot the 
decorations were due to Miss Marie 
Gelvvicks. Music for the evening wai 
^furnished by Harry Runkle's Blue ant. 
While Orchestra. 

O 

ALBRIGhT VICTOR 

IN CLOSE CONTEST 

^Continued from Page 1) 

bright, was responsible for twelve o. 
her team's points. 

LEBANON VALLEY 

G. F. Pl, 

Clark, r. f 4 

Rice, r. f o 1 1 

Y/ingst, 1. f 5 2 1 

March, c I. ....... o t 

Hershey, s. c c 

Rupp, r. g 1 1 

Fields, r. g o 

Cochran, 1. g. (Capt.) 

Total J ; 

ALBRIGHT 



YALE PROF. SECURED 

AS CHAPEL SPEAKER 



Mosser, r. f 3 

Detterline, 1. f 3 

Beninger, c 

Eisenbise, s. c 



G. F. Pt 

6 ) 

3 
o 
o 
o 



o 



o 



Wilkes, s. c o 

Deck, r. g 1 

Porter, 1. g 

Total lit 

()— 

CHURCH EDUCATORS 

MEET IN DAYTON 



1 he student body will have the rare 
privilege of hearing and being in con- 
tact with Dr. Henry H. Tweedy, Pro. 
fessor of Homiletics at \ ale Univer- 
sity, next Tuesday and Wednesday, 
March 4 and 5. 

iHe will probably speak after din- 
ner Tuesday evening and will address 
the assembly Wednesday morning on 
■'Wihy Religion" or "Religion foi 
College Students" and attempt to 
give students a firm foundation for a 
be let in God. He is the only speakei 
ot tins subject and ;s thoroughly cora- 
of th.s subject and is thorughly com- 
pe,ent to handle it. 'the remainder 
of h'iS stay on the campus will be 
Sfc/ent meeting groups and individ- 
ua.s who have religious problems. 

Last summer at Eagles Mere Dr. 
iweedy helped scores ot students U 
jsolve their questions and it is hoped 
.that the students here will feel free 
io approach him with any interroga- 
tions they may have which bear upon 
religion. He is another and probably 
the last of the chapel speakers to be 
brought here by the Star Course 
Committee. 

O 



DR. POHLMAN SPEAKS 

TO COLLEGE DINERS 



jj Er. Augustus Pohlman, who has 
ilbeen secured by the united efforts oi 
jjthc churches of Annville to speak 
pour successive nights of this week 
Jin various churches, was present ir 
lithe college d'ning room on Tuesday 
evening, and addressed the student 
body after dinner. Quite uncon- 
jsciously he demonstrated that "brev- 
ity is the soul of wit," for the stu- 
I dents had just become thorough!} 
! !arouscd and interested by his gen- 
eral remarks, announcement of his 
subjects for the week, and genuine 
good humor, when he unexpected'} 
ended his remarks. Students art 
i^eager to hear more from him during 
the week and to welcome him back to 
the college campus at any time. 



IHE PENNWAY 
BARBER SHOP 

N. M. RAUSCH, Prop. 
Annville, P». 



iOPFMAN STEAM PRESS- 
ING 

KEYSTONE HAT CLEANING 

STEYE WORNAS 



10 W. Main St. 



Annville, P» 



Professor G. A. Richie spent last 
Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday ! : 
in Dayton, Ohio, representing the 
college at the Annual Meeting of the 
Board of Christian Education and the \ 
Educational Conference of the Unit- 
ed Brethren Church. 

This Conference was made tip 01] 
members of the General Board of 1 
General Board of Christian Educ i- 
tion, representatives from the sev j 
eral church colleges and the scm : - 
nary, bishops and pastors of the 
churches. It was called to make a 
study of the methods, policies, prob- 
lems and programs of the educational 
department of the denomination. 
O 

DR. REYNOLDS AT 

JERSEY CONFERENCE 



. Dr. Reynolds and Professor Dot- 
ter, principal of Annville High School, 
attended the Educational Conference 
at Atlantic City, New Jersey, this 
week. The conference composed of 
prominent educators from the east 
who came together to discuss the big 
problems that confront them in their 
field. 



11 



viiu 



flnnn 



Wm. Penn Highway 



Near Annville 



Meals Served at All Hours 

BANQUETS AND PARTIES 
Our Specialty 



SPEAKERS DISCUSS 

WORLD OUTLOOK 

(Continued from Page 1) 



interested in the work of the World 
Student Christian Association of 
which every student is a part. Point- 
ing out that the unrest of the world 
is reflected in the student body of 
every University, Mr. Corbett cited 
some interesting examples of Gentile 
students in foreign Universities at- 
tacking the Jews. The reason for such 
conditions is economic, the speaker 
declared. 

It is the purpose of' the Internation- 
al Student Christian Association tc 
bring about such a broadened outlook 
in Universities as to quell the riots 
when no distinction need be found be- 
tween Jew and Gentile. 

Mr. Tunga was the chapel speaker 
on Thursday morning. He dwelled 
briefly on the question of the expres- 
sion of the individual. Asserting that 
mankind should not content himself 
with the acquisition of the bare neces- 
sites of life, Mr. Tunga declared that 
it is a privilege as well as a sacred 
trust that each person leave the world 
really changed. 

The purpose of humanity is to ex- 
press itself, and creative expression 
cannot be found in devoting our en 
tire lives to the amassing of ma 
terial things, but sufficient time must 
be given to a noble expression of our 
minds. 



200 SINGLE SHEETS AND 
100 ENVELOPES 
— ALL FOR $1.00— 

With name and address — Splendid 
quality of paper 

BOLLMANS 

33 South Eighth Street, 

Lebanon, Pa. 



D. RUSSO 

LOOK LOW PRICES LOOK 

Men's Half Soles 

& Heeels $1.50 

Men's Half Soles $1.00 

Ladies Half Soles & 

Rubber Heels $1.15 

Ladis Half Soles 80c. With 

Top Life $1.05 

Ladies Rubber Heels 

35c Top Lift 25c 

9 E MAIN ST. 
CENTRAL SHOE REPAIRING 
SHOP 



D. L SAYLOR & SONS 

Contractors 

LUMBER AND GOAL 

ANNVILLE. PA. 



PRINTIN( 



When you want work 
of the better kind see 

HIESTER-The p rinter 



HW MILLER 



Annville 



HARDWARE 
OF QUALITY 



Pa. 



PHOTOGRAPHS 



LIVE FOREVER 



Wrich's Studio 



820 Cumberland St. 



PRINTING 

PUBLICATION. 
BOOKS, CATA 
LOGUES, STATION- 
ERY, CARDS, TAGS, 

ANNVILLE PRINTING 
COMPANY 




ANNVILLE 



PA. 



RUSSEL and SPANGLER 

Our Agents At 
LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 
FINKELSTEIN 
Cleaners & Dyers 



TRY OUR HOME MADE 
SANDWICHES 

QUALITY LUNCH 

BREYER'S ICE CREAM 
A Specialty 

7 E. Main St. Annville, Pa. 



For Quality 

Baked Products 

Patronize 

FINK'S BAKERY 

Main Street 



For 

QUALITY PLUS 

in 

Material and Workmanship 
Repairs at Special Rates 
Go To 

ANNVILLE SHOEMAN 
207 W. Main 



AFTER THE GAME VISIT 

THE PENNIAY 

OPPOSITE P. O. 
A FULL LINE OF FRESH PASTRY DAILY 



ga 

Wi 

33 
wi 
ap 
to 

afc 
on 

4ei 
wl 
ba 
a : 

se< 
ed 
sb> 
srr 

lej 

in, 
go; 
Sh 
of 



D] 



sc< 
no 

Wl; 

cai 
rel 
on 

] 

Wii 
as 

"T 
<lr; 
\va 
tea 
of 
del 
del; 
ne f 
ted 
era 
J 
spc 
GU 
thi 
Mi, 

( 

Wi] 
Sec 
ab ( 

si 



DON'T MISS 
FILIPINO COLLEGIANS 
WED. MAR. 12 



laJFte Colktjiettne 

. LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE k 



ALBERT ACADEMY 
DRIVE MAR. 10-17 
LET'S GO! 



VOLUME VI 



ANNVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA, THURSDAY, MARCH 6, 1930 



No. 1 



LEAD TO L. Y. FOE 



TEAMS SINK SHOT FOR 
SHOT IN CLOSE 
BATTLE 



Lebanon Valley's quintette gave an 
other superb exhibition of its ability 
to emerge from a score that looks 
like ultimate defeat to certain vie 
tory when coach Mylin's men beat 
Franklin and Marshall last Saturday 
night, March 1, in tthe Annville High, 
gymnasium. 

Trailing at one time by fifteen 
points, the Blue and White closed the 
gap to eight points at the half and 
won out in the end by the score o 
33-30. It was the second time in ; 
week that the local boys pulled ai 
apparently hopeless game into a vie 
tory. 

The game was the most exciting 
and showed the hardest fighting seei 
on the local floor this year. Each 
■team resorted to questionable tactics 
which ruined any chance for gooi 
basketball and turned the contest into 
a melee. 

In the first half, Lebanon Valley 
seemed entirely off form. They pass 
ed wildly and could not sink theii 
shots. F. and M., however, playet 
smoothly until they had amasse-. 
nineteen points against Lebanon Val- 
ley's four. At this point the game 
looked lost, but a foul by Heller, twe 
goals by Ulrich, and a third goal by 
Shroyer served to increase the hopes 
of the crowd. The score at the end 
(Continued on Page 4) 
O • 



DEBATERS MEET IN 

LOCAL CONTEST 

Kalo Hall Friday night was the 
sc en e of a final rehearsal of the Leba 
non Valley debating teams to decide 
which debaters should be selected 10 
carry on Lebanon Valley's forensic 
Nations with Elizabethtown College 
0n Monday niight, March third. 

Professor Stokes acted as chairman 
W1 th Professors Stevenson and Shenk 
as critics 

Hie question for devate "Resolved: 

fh at the United States should with- 

r *w from the Kellogg Peace Pact' 

t Was handled very capably by both 

a ms and showed that a great deal 

Preparation had been taken by the 
debate 



deb 



- rs - After the question had been 
at ed by both the affirmative and 



^gative te am.s, the rebuttal 



ted 



was omu- 



and the debate ended in a gen 
1' discussion group. 

, Shroyer was chosen first 

Peakpr c 

Gl- . 1 le affirmative side, with 

third ~ > ' ~ 

\». ' and Homer Allwein alternate 

"Use tr 

affi 



adys Knaub second, Hilda Hes' 



' Ss Hess will be the captain of the 
Jmative team, 
win"! the "Native side, Martha Daley 
s ecQ ^ first speaker, Gerald Heilman 
ab et J! Russe11 Ettcr, third, and Eliz 
Was 1 Fe ver, alternate. Mr. Etter 
S j d Selec ted captain of the negative 



PAGEANT LAUNCHES 

ACADEMY DRI^L 



Final preparations for the Y. M. & 
Y. W. pagent for the "Lebanon Val- 
ley in Africa"' drive having been 
completed, director Miss Rife an- 
nounces that it will be presented m 
Tuesday next, at 8:00 P. M. in the 
College Chapel. The pageant has been 
several weeks in preparation, and 
prom.ses to be educational as well 
as entertaining. A hearty mvita 
tion is extended to the entire faculty, 
the student body, and the community. 



-O- 



YALE PROFESSOR 
DISCUSSES RELIGION 



STUDENTS ENJOY 
PRACTICAL CHAPEL I 
ADDRESS 



RESEARCHES ACCEPTED 
BY MAGAZINES 
OF REPUTE 



The science departments may well 
be proud of the alumni they have been 
sending forth into the scientific fields. 
The prestige of these alumni is not 
only of the greatest credit to them- 
selves but throws also a most favor- 
able reflection upon their Alma Ma- 
ter. The most tangible means of re- 
viewing the achievements of Lebanon 
Valley's scientists is by examining 
the list of their magazine contribu- 
tion. This list shows definitely the 
wide field of the scientists' researches 

Dr. Charles H. Arndt '14, who is 
working at the Coffee Experiment 
Station of Haiti, has contributed the 
following articles to the American: 
Journal of Botany, the same appear- 
ing in volume 16: Configuration and 
Some Effects of Light and Gravity on 
Coffee arabica; The Movement of 
Sap Coffee arabica; The Marine Algae 
of the Southwestern Peninsula oi 
Hispaniola. 

Dr. Edward F. Castetter '19, head 
of the Department of Biology at the 
University of New Mexico, has alsc 
contributed to the American Journal 
of Botany, volume seventeen, No. 1 
an article on Species Croosses in the 
Genus Cucurbita. 

Working at the Central Dutch In- 
stitute for Brain Research in Amster- 
dam, Holland, Dr. H. H. Charlton 
'14, as made numerous investigations 
which he embodies in an article en- 
titled The Pars Magnocellularis of 
the Nucleus Preopticus, particularly 
in Urodela. Dr. Charlton at the pres- 
ent time is at the School of Medicine, 
University of Missouri. 

From the pen Dr. W. F. Wenner's 
'23, assistant professor of Zoology at 
the University of Iowa, come the fol- 
lowing articles which appeared in the 
Proceedings of the Soc : ety of Exper- 
imental Biology and Medicine, volume 
25: Sulfate Retention in Dogs follow- 
ing Bilateral Renal Exterpation; Ef- 
fect of Bilateral Nephrectomy upon 
the Acid-base Equilibrium of Dogs. 



On Tuesday and Wednesday, Leb- 
anon Valley College diad the good 
fortune to hear Dr. Henry H. Tweedy, 
professor in Homiletics at Yale Uni- 
versity, speak on the subject in which 
he is well qualified, religion. Dr 
Tweedy arrived on our campus in 
time to meet the Life Work Recruit 
group, Tuesday evening at 8:15. He 
also spoke in church W? 9:15 Wednes- 
day morning and 'rivet a group' in 
Philo Hall at 10:15. - : 

Professor Tweedy is a man who 
relizes the ambiguities various phases 
of religion and proceeded in his talks 
to dispel as many aV he could, dwell- 
ing brieftly upon conceptions obtain- 
ed in early life and the realization oi 
their impossibility in later life. 

The main theme of his talk to the 
Life Work Recruit group was Prayer. 
Prayer, he contends, is too often a- 
bused. We should live our prayers 
and not sit back expecting results 
without the effort on our part. Pul- 
pit prayer, he said, should consist in 
the preacher leading his congrega-. 
tion and not lamenting the woes that 
have befallen us, because God already 
knows them. 

" »- 
During his speech in chapel he 

stressed the precariousness of religion 
in thejf^prriculum of the college man. 
"To the college man," he said, "re- 
ligion seems unreal because it doe? 
not lend itself to the truths of chem- 
istry and physics". Then he compared 
the joy of God with that of music,- 
saying that one does not want a 
critic's view point of symphony, bu'. 
that one wants to hear it himself. 11 
is the same with God, to be enjoyed 
he must be felt. "Why do we -believe 
in God? ''he asks, "What is God in 
our daily life? And w'ho would find 
out if we had lost him yesterday: 
What has Jesus saved you from? 
Listening to stories will not feed you 
and it is these experiences that hav< 
caused people to give up religion.'' 

(Continued on Page 2) 

O 

SOCIETY APPOINTEES 

COMPLETE STAFF 



MRS. GOSSARD 

LEAVES HOSPITAL 



The 19-0-31 La Vie staff was com- 
pleted this week by the appointment 
of the four Society Reporters. Free 
Murd '32 and Percy Clements \v 
were chosen to represent the Philo 
and Kalo societies respectively, wdv'lc 
j the Dehphian and CHonian societies 
; will be represented by Mary Epply 
'32 and Dorothy Garber '32. Although 
I these reporters have had no previour 
La Vie experience, their addition tc 
the staff is expected to be a decided 
benefit. The staff as completed' con 
tains promising material, and with 
the cooperation of the student body 
may be expected to maintain the 
.standard set by its predecessors. 



The friends of Mrs. Gossard wili 
be giad to learn that she left Johns 
Hopkins Hospital last Saturday and 
is recuperating at the home of her 
sister, Mrs. Edwin Bishop, of Balti- 
more. 

Mrs. Gossard expects to remain 
there for a week, and then plans to 
leave for Atlantic City, where she will 
stay for a short time. 

— O ■ 



IN CLOSE MATCH 



CLARK BREAKS TIE 
IN LAST SECOND 
OF PLAY 



OPPONENTS TAKE 
FORENSIC YICTORY 



In a closely-fought contest, the 
Lebanon Valleyites" emerged victor- 
ious over the Ursinus sextette by tin. 
score of 19-.8 on the Ursinus flooi 
March 1, 1930. 

Lebanon Valley opened with ai. 
avalanche of baskets but Ursinu.-, 
came back with several shots to make 
the score tie again and again. At the 
end of the half the score stood ii-k 
in favor of Ursinus. 

In the second half of the game the 
Ursinus team scored a lead of 'fou, 
points and kept it until the last few 
minutes of the game when Lebanon 
Valley came forth with a m ghty 
spurt and sank several shots. Clark 
was high scorer for Lebanon Valley 
while Keys and Connor were high 
scorers for Ursinus. 

The ganu was fast-moving 
throughout and the victory was not 
apparent at any time during the con 
test. 

GETTYSBURG SUNK 

j The girls divided their honors witl 
Gettysburg for the season by defeat 
ing them 27-24 last Thursday after 
noon in the AnnviHe High gymna 
sium. This victory for L. V., fol 
lowing their recent defeat at Gettys 
burg, balanced their athletic status 
The game was close but clean cu 
throughout, as the result of the ref 
eree's calling the plays closely. 

Lebanon Valley started off to ; 
slight lead as their guards held the 
opposing forv\ ards. However, Green- 
away's foul shooting kept Gettysbur 
in the running and a spurt near th< 
end of the half tied the score a 
12-12. 

Gettysburg ied during most of tlu 
second half; but with a few mmutes 
to go, Lebanon Valley again tied the 
score. A little later Clark made 
good on a foul shot and immediately 
after sunk a field goal for the three 
point margin. 

1 he whole team played well and 
earned the hard fought victory. 



LOCAL AFFIRMATIVES 
OPEN SEASON AT 
ELIZABETHTOWN 



The affirmative debatirg team 01 
Lebanon Valley travelled to Eliza- 
bethtown College on Monday, March 
3, to meet the negative team of that 
institution. Tn spite of a 3-0 decision 
of the judges in favor of Elizabeth- 
town, the local debaters presented 
their arguments with commendable 
accuracy and clearness that showed 
much careful deliberat'on. 

The constructive speeches of the 
affirmatives were admirably deliver- 
ed, but in the rebuttal the negative 
team had prepared some surprises 
which took the affirmative team un- 
awares. The affirmative side of this 
question, it must be remembered, is 
the moredifficult to uphold, and the 
debaters must be congratulated upon 
the strong argumentat : on they pre- 
sented. 

Elizabethtown was represented by 
Miss Ealey, Miss Herschman and 
Miss Bell, captain, with Miss Heisey 
as alternate. Miss Knaub, Mis- 
Shroyer, Miss Hess, captain, and 
Miss Le Fevre, alternate, composed 
the Lebanon Valley team. Those who 
presided as judges were the principal 
of York High School, the princi d 
of Columbia High School, ard Miss 
Mary Clemens, Engksh professor o? 

(Continued on Page 3) 

O • 

STUDENTS ENJOY 

SHAKESPEARE'S PLAY 



Several of the students tak'ng the 
Shakespeare course this year motored 
to Philadelphia on Saturday, Marcn 
1, with Dr. Wallace to rhiladelph'a 
to see the presentation of Fritz I.ei- 
ber in "The Taming of the Shrew." 

Th's play, although c'assed among 
the less original of his creations, is 
one of Shakespeare's most deh'ghtfii 
and swift-movong plays. As it was 
dramatized in real Shakespearean 
style, the costumes were gorgeous 
The color contrasts were espec'ally 
effective and well-planned. Fritz Lei- 
ber, first in the role of Christopher 
Sly, the cobbler, and then as Petru- 
chio, suitor of Katbarina, the shrew 
was superb. 

All agree that these performance- 
which have been witnessed by variou 
members of the class are very instruc 
tive, and aid in a better understand- 
ing of Shakespearean drama in tlv 
classroom. Such opportunites an 
always appreciated and the class wish 
es to express their thanks to Doctrr 
Wallace and Mrs. Wallace for the.': 
kindness. 

The students in the party inchidcr' 
Elizabeth Hoy, Caroline F : sher, Do-- 
othy Thompson. Ruth Liller and 
Paul Evancoe. 



I 



PAGE TWO 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 6 1930 

— ' --■'■LI 



ESTABLISHED 1926 



A weekly publication by the Under 
graduate Students of Lebanon 
"Valley College 



EDITORIAL STAFF 

Russel Etter, '31 Editor-in-Chief 

Ruth Liller, '31 Associate Editor 

R. Roudabush, '31 .... Associate Editor 
R .Morgan, '31 .... Managing Edito 



KSFOBTOKIAL STAFF 

Robert Eshleman, '31 

Madeline Sbeddy, '31 

Ruth Shroyer, '32 

Hilda Buckley, '32 

Walter Krumbeigel, '33 

General Reporters 

Mary Goshert, '32 Conservatory 

Robert Rawhouser, '32 Athletics 

Dorothy Garber, '32 Clionia 

Mary Epply, '32 Delphian 

Percy Clements, '33 Kalozeteai 

Fred Mund, '32 Philokosmian 

Edna Early, '31 .... Alumni Reporte 



BUSINESS STAFF 

G. Becker, '31 .... Business Manager 

P. Keene, '32 Asst. Business Manage 

C. Wise, '31 .... Circulation Manage 



FACULTY ADVISORS 

Dr. Paul A. W. Wallace, English Dept. 
Miss Mary K. Wallace, English Dept 
Dr. Paul S. Wagner Math. Dept 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE. a membe 
of the Intercollegiate Newspaper Asso 
ciation of the Middle Atlantic States. 



Single Copies 10 cents 

Subscription $1.50 per year 

Entered at the Annville, Pa., post 
office as second class matter under the 
Act of March 3, 1879. 



WE GREET YOU 



With the publication of this issue 
we of the 1930-31 LA VIE Staff tip 
toe our ways into the halls of journal 
ism and take our places with the 
proper amount of fear and trembling 
vv hat a verdant bunch of neophytes 

c a e! How we wish that we might 
have entered these halls "trailing 
clouds of glory," but alas! A trusty 
eversharp, an eraser — two erasers, a 
ream of paper and a will to do is all 
that we bring with us. 

We wonder how we will be re 
received? We think of the achieve 
merits of our predecessors, the high 
standards they have set. We remem 
ber that the spirit of Lebanon Valley 
demands that we surpass those stan- 
dards; it will not be sufficient to 
merely reach their mark, we must 
pass above and beyond — then we 
tremble some more. 

Our final judge, of course, is the 
student body. Will they be char 
ab e? Will their criticism be embod- 
ied in helpful suggestions? Will 
they remember that the LA VIE i 
their paper, that we are merely their 
- representatives, and that their co 
operation is needed to make the LA 
VIE a success? We wonder. 

O 



HEAR A DEBATE! 



All of you who have ever mount- 
ed the rostrum can sense the feeling 
of elation tiiat sweeps into the heart 
as you gaze out over the audience and 
see — well, after all someone appre 
ciates the attempts of you who labor 
day after day and night after night. 
And for what? For personal distinc 
tion and honor? . Yes, a feeling o 
pride does crown the achievement o 
tht' debater who has fought and con- 
quered honorably, but it is not alone 
personal pride. Pride for your Aim? 
Mater; pride for those who have sup- 
ported your efforts so nobly; pride m 
knowing you have done your best tc 
uphold the honor of your school! 

And students, it is not the victory 
alone which distinguishes the strug- 
gle; honor is more than victory — a 
defeat may be a more outstanding 



can take a "licking" as nobly as a giant? Yes, but only a mushroom, 
"winning"? | Above the little heap of ruins the 

Yes, debating is fun— especially in winds still played in the leaves of the 
the rebuttals. Plenty of vim, vigor, towering oak. How many storms it 
and vitality is manifested, and all you had weathered, who could tell? 
who experience the inner urge to ex-. Rough, iil-proportioned in places 
pound occasionally are invited to join' mishapen here, unsymmetrical there 
the ranks of these brave and fiery — but endirr ng. Giant not for a da> 
orators. j but for generations. 

How many of you who read this Are not these symbols of two 
article have ever attempted to assem- types of achievement? May we not 
ble material for a debate? How many here discover the parallels of two 
have organized the material available college students. The one works for 
into a speech? How many have spent grades and a diploma; flashing per- 
hours of real honest-to-goodness la- fectwui, form, technique— these belong 
bor, working up a convincing sum- to the g : anls of a day But the othe 
nrary of arguments requisite for the ] ays nrm i y t]ie foundations for a ca 
rebuttal? Then, how many have ever reer that on i y the (1 j stant future can 
mounted the rostrum and experienced br ing to completion, a career that 
the sensation of being prepared for shall endure. 

the onslaughts of the opposition? Oaks or mushrooms; which shal 
You alone who have attempted all we he? 

these steps in debating know that a I q 

debate is not made in one night nor nDrM7T7c<cn 
in one week— patience and keenness YALE PROFESSOR 



Among Our Seniors 



DISCUSSES RELIGION 

(Continued from Page 1) 



are developed in the struggle, but all 
takes time! 

To provide an incentive to these 
hard-working groups they must have Next hg us Qn how tQ lo§e a 

Cooperation. The least they expect friend gtab h ; ffl ;„ thg back> ^ to 
is that each of you be sufficiently in- hjm Qr ]eave ^ alone R ^ ^ 
terested to attend these debates. Of 



course, it is impossible to journey 



same with religion, which can b 

i killed by hypocr'sy an insincerity, 
away with the teams every time, but! t-. • , • . . . 

J 1 Dogmat sm, he points out, is an- 

as many home debates are scheduled „ , . • • 

J other weak point in our rehg'ous 

this year as are scheduled away/ hecau?e by acccpting th( 

Many of 1 you have no idea how the , v c , • , , r , . , 

J • . , beliefs wh ch others have formulated 

ardor of those debating is dimmed by! , , ,, ., , £ . 

we do not enjoy half the benefits 



viewing row upon row of empty 
and 



wlrch we couM derive, had we formu- 
seats and by hearing their own , t , , ,. , , „ , , . 

, .... . , latcd the be! efs ourselves. One should 

voices reechoing in their ears. And . „ , , , . . 

, , , , investigate all creeds and rely on his 

f they lose, probably they are not so 1 . , , . , , 

, \ L1 _ . x L iL , own judgement to chose the best for 

him. The creeds which our elders 

hand down are apt to prove faulty 

when we try to fit them into the cos- 



much to blame — it may be that you're 

to blame! 

You all turn out for recitals, for 

Basket Ball games, for pageants — all 

3. , . . mos of Einstem s relativity and elec- 

which represent a vast quantity ot , 



effort and time expended. Why dc 
you shirk and jerk away from de 
bates? They are interesting and of 
practical value to each and every one 
Come! Show your school spirit 
Here's your chance to share the bur- 
den. Turn out! Bring your "dates' 
along and enjoy the debates together 
There is nothing to lose and every- 
thing to win! 

O 

OAKS OR MUSHROOMS? 



trons. an attempt which often results 
in throwing it all overboard. He is 
not suprised, that the scientist is not 
concerned with religion becaure, as 
he says, "A man who works ten hours 
a day, and six days out of seven a 
week, with chemical and physical 
foimulae, is not apt to have much 
time for religious investigation." 

"Then what do all people want?" 
he asks and answers, "The people' 
want all the joys, beauties and rich- 
ness of life. Life in all its fullness. 
Life itself. That is what Jesus prom- 
ised. And how may we get this full- 
Several summers ago, while camp- ness of life? By i Gve for God andl 

ing in a bit of woodland, the writer man! Q ne should have boundless) 
discovered a mushroom of prodigious courageous good vv iH, and should 
size growing beneath a giant oak. The work with Qod to achieve happiness 
lily-white stem of the fungus rose to on ear .,, If you want to provc it> 
a height of six or seven inches, and do the opposite. What will happen? 
was crowned with a well-nigh per- y ou w jjj yfl yourself!" 
feet disc, approximately five inches in Dr Tweedy evidently is a poor pat- 
diameter and delicately tinged with riot as he doe , not agree w ; th t]u . 
brown above and cream beneath. maxinii "My country, right or 
More impressive than its size were wrongi » and i nst cad he tells us to 
the perfect symmetry of its contour dca] mQre considerately w th the 
and the mellow softness of its color- negress of Africa and the Chinese 
ng. And then to realize that it had fearing that they too will someday 
sprung up in a single night— here, in-j nave a civ iii zation comparable to our 
deed, was a marvel. own And woe to us should thcy 
Above this g.ant of the fungus segk revenge for the present wrongs 
world towered another giant, an oak done them 




WARREN E. BURTNER 



victory if merited honorably. Who 

of you, are such good sports that you* mass of decaying vegetable matter. A 



of massive proportions; but it was a 
giant of a different sort. There was 
here none of the perfect symmetry 
of the mushroom. The trunk was 
bent and twisted; the branches push 
ed their way hither and thither to 
ward the sun without regard to form; 
the very roots were forced into a 
myriad of serpentine coils and knots 
by the rocky soil in which they were 
anchored. Nor was this the product 
of a single night; generations had 
come and gone since the little seed- 
ling burst through the shell of the 
acorn and first pushed its tiny leaflets 
nto the light of day. 

Next morning, the writer made a 
second trip to examine the giants, but 
how changed was the situation! A 
light tap from the foot of sime idile 
passer-by had completely destroyed 
the mushroom. Instead of flawless 
perfection in form or color, there re- 
mained but a blackened and shapeless 



Following the chapel program, Dr. 
Tweedy conducted an unusual group 
discussion, and dealt with many of 
our modern problems in biblical in- 
terpretation. In all his works whih 
on the campus he was most inspir- 
ing. The sentiment of the student 
body is decidely in favor of this type 
of conference work, and it is to be 
hoped that more men of Dr. 
Twedy's calibre will be obtained in 
the future. 

O 

HALLMAN IMPROVING 



The many friends of Horace Hall- 
man will be pleased to learn of his 
rapid recovery. He has returned 
from the hospital, and, although stil' 
eon fined to bed, is expected to be 
about within a week. The campus 
unites in wishing him a most rapid 
convalescence, and anticipates his re 
turn in the very near future. 



Every noon a tall young man, no. 
unhandsome, may be seen wending 
his way toward the High school, lie 
is grave and serious. Always there 
is a book under his arm. His na'nn 
is Warren E. Burtner, but do not le 
this deceive you. "Burt'' has hit 
other moments. 

He is an ardent disciple of tht 
Terpsichore and enjoys a 'warm 
modern tune. "The Man from the 
South,'' is one. He also enjoys a 
good bridge game and has missed 
many a decent night's sleep because 
of the pasteboards. 

Burtner spent his under classmen 
days at Muhlenberg, and was quite a 
stranger when he joined us. This, 
however, did not deter him from 
quickly becoming acclimated, which 
was an easy thing for him, being an 
amiable and conversant fellow. A? 
he had journalistic tastes, he soon pro- 
cured a position on the LA VIE staff 
and began 'dishing the dirt.' Destiny, 
however selected him. for teaching, 
with the result that journalism loses 
and pedagogy gains. 



ESTHER ANGSTADT 



One would hardly think it, to look 
at her, quiet, unassuming, yet the edi- 
tor of the LA VIE for the past year 
Hvery Wednesday she could be found 
at the printer's office reading write- 
ups, proofs and what-not, carrying on 
the editor's task successfully. No one 
has ever fulfilled the obligations of 
editorship better than she. It was she 
who is responsible for the success of 
the paper in the past year, a fact alone 
which draws our admiration and 
congratulations. 

Even now when the new editor is 
ill and temporarily incapacitated, she 
is taking over his duties, giving as- 
signments and aiding in the writing, 
in order to keep this paper up to the 
standards which she and those before 
her have set. Surely this is unself- 
ishness! 

Miss Angstadt is a native of Read- 
ing a nd came to our fold in the fail 
of 1927 after having spent her 
"Frosh" days at Northwestern Uni- 
versity. She is a member of the CH- 
onian Literary society, and was iti 
chaplain in her first year here and 
served on its judiciary committee last 
year. She is majoring in English, 
naturally. 



Y. W. C. A. NOTES 



"Faith'' was the theme of the 
"Friendly Hour" discussion on Sun 
day evening, March 2. The program 
was in charge of the Junior Class 
headed by Mary Stager. The scrip- 
ture lesson was taken from Hebrew 
1 1 : r -6, which deals with the nature 
and fruits of "Faith." A very im- 
pressive talk on the theme was givei 
by Sarah Ensminger. Several poems, 
in keeping with the subject, were also 
read by various members of the class 
Prayer, offered by Sarah Ensmingei 
brought the brief inspirational perio, 
to a close. 



A MATH FREAK 



To those persons interested ilj 
Mathematical curiosities, here is one 
discovered by a Greek professor. Take 
the figures 142,875. Multiply this by 
two, three, four, five, and six. In each 
case the product contains the same 
figures and the same sequences. Whe'i 
multiplied by six, the two sets of fig- 
ures are exactly transposed. But 
multiply the above figures by that 
mystic number, seven, and you g el 
the| curious result of 999,999. 



CLOTHING OF QUALITY 

J S BASEHORE 



Leb 



anon, 



Pa. 



KREAMER BROS. 



STEINITE RADIOS 
EASY ELECTRIC WASH*' R 

COLUMBIA GAS STOVES AND RANGES 
RUGS AND LINOLEUMS 

"House of Better Values" 
FURNITURE AND UNDERTAKING 

328 W. Main St. Phone 6R3 



Annville, Pa- 



Shaeffer's Lifetime Pens — 

NONE BETTER ABSOLUTELY GUARANTEED 

AN EVERYDAY NECESSITY FOR 
COLLEGE STUDENTS 

The Gift Store of Lebanon 
757-759 Cumberland Street 



HARPEL'S 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 6, 1930 



PAGE THREE 



ok 
h- 
ir 
lid 

:e- 

ne 
of 
he 
of 
ne 
ml 



ig, 
he 
ire 
lt- 

Sd- 
ail 

te'r 

:h- 

it; 
nd 

ist 



,ke 
by 
cU 
nc 
en 
ig- 
Jul 
tat 

TP I 




"A COLLEGE JOKE T O CURE THE 'BLUES' 



— Jonathan Swift. 



KAPPA LAMBDA NU 



Miriam Silvius translating in French 46: "Amour-prope" means proper 
[ ovej doesn't it? 

Madame Johnson: Did you say puppy love? 
Silvius, blushing furiously: O, no, proper love! 

—LVC— 

Madeline: Come and help me hold Polly. She's falling out the window 
Jo: Oh, let 'er drop. 

— LVC— 

Taylor: Is this a firss class restaurant? 

Waiter: Yes, but if you'll sit over there in that dark corner, we'll serve 

you. 

— LVC— 

To the victor belong the goils. 

— LVC— 

Evancoe (rushing into the library) : I want Caesar's life. 
Miss Myers: Sorry, but Brutus beat you to it. 

— LVC— 

Hertzler: Barney hung up his sox on Christmas eve. 
Christman: What did he get? 

Hertzler: A notice from the Health Department. 

— LVC— 

Joe: Put two and two together and what do you get? 
Ike: Bridge. 

— LVC— 

Dr.: You're the tenth college boy who's had his thumb bandaged in 

here today. 

Kuhnert: Chef always does serve his soup too hot. 

— LVC— 

She: College boy? 

He: No, I couldn't get in where I wanted to. 
She: Where did you try? 
He: Vassar. 

—LVC— 

When found robbing a fish store, be nonchalant, smoke a herring. 

-LVC— 

Clem 1 : I just bumped my crazy bone. 

Ruth: Comb your hair straight and it won't show. 

— LVC— 

Henrietta Wagner: I wan to buy something to wear around the house. 
Clerk; Just how big is your house? 

—LVC— 

Prof. Bender: Who made the first nitride? 
Gardner Saylor: Paul Revere. 

—LVC— 

"Lot's wife had nothing on me," said the prisoner, as he turned to a pile 
of stone. 

—LVC— 
He held her to his manly breast 

And whispered, "How I love thee" 
He had not time to say the rest — 

His roadster climbed an elm-tree. 

BE LIEVE IT OR NOT- 

adys Knaub maintains that Chopin was a Frenchman. 
_ud Hoy's greatest ambition is to be a bishop. 

^llcnberger writes inspirational poetry. 
R°udabush wears spats with his Tux. 



°rker Becker is a personal friend of Fmilly Post. 
^Peg i s fr0m Garfiekl 

ocky Schrope is studying Piano. 
nn e Gordon is reading "Little Women." 
ull nger actually attended History 46 class last Friday. 
^ Pu ggy and Roudy have applied for admittance to the early morning 
Hiking Club. 

Th ee Wise doesn't know either why they call him that. 
1e Frosh have a basket ball team. 



On Friday night, the members 01 
Clio witnessed a clever program 
which was presented by the day stu 
dents. In a short prologue by Mrs. 
Sione, the listeners were acquainted 
with the theme of the program— 
"Maladie du Printemps." The room 
artistically decorated with flowers 
added to the springtime atmosphere 

The effect of a few days of warm 
weather on various types of individ- 
uals, was portrayed. Ethel Hower, 
representing a poet, read the verses 
which the season had in spired in her. 
Ann Augusta Esbenshade, Margaret 
Paris, and Luella Umberger proveo 
that Mother Nature can stir even tht 
most diligent of students. Othei 
girls, in their respective roles, illus 
trated how farmers, working in the 
fields, are forced by spring fever tc 
lay down their shovels; children be 
gin to fish, shoot marbles, and jumj. 
rope; housewives become more activi 
over the back fence. Mary Rank, ii 
a delightful vocal solo, showed the 
musician's frame of mind. The say 
ing, "In the spring, a young man's 
fancy lightly turns to thoughts of 
love", was proven by the two young 
men, impersonated by Helen Boyei 
and Marcella Greiner, in their ac- 
tions toward their sweethearts, Mar> 
Rank and Helen Groh. The finale 
"Happy Days Are Here Again,' - , sung 
by the entire group of day students 
indicated the effect of springtime or 
all. 

O 



KAPPA LAMBDA SIGMA 



Kalo members enjoyed a varied 
musical program presented in the 
form of a Radio broadcast at their 
weekly session. Announcer Trezise 
of station K-A-L-O was exceptionally 
good and his appropriate "wise 
cracksj" and weather reports added 
much to the enjoyment of those pres 
ent. 

K-A-L-O went on the air at six 
thirty o'clock, correct time being fur 
nished through the courtesy of the 
makers of the Lon Gine Conservatory 
watches. Devotions were led by John 
Morris. Clarence "Babe" Earley ren- 
dered his version of "Moanin' Low." 
A musical number entitled "Fol-de 
Rol" was given by Messrs. Morris 
Willard, Salek, Speg and McCusker 
in which many old time melodies were 
revived. Announcer Trezise furnished 
the listeners with the latest news re 
ports which brought to light much 
campus scandal. "Scotch McCusker 
and "Dutch" Speg rendered the Irish 
"The Wearing of the Green." "Banjo 
Blues" by Messrs. Morris and Wil 
Hard and "District Harmony" by the 
gang closed the musical part of the 
program. 

The society was favored with a few- 
inspiring remarks from Mr. Waggon- 
er '28, a former Kalo president. He 
seemed pleased with the society'^ 
progress and urged the loyal Kaloze- 
teans to keep up the good work. 

O 

PHI LAMBDA SIGMA 



DELTA LAMBDA SIGMA 



A short but interesting meeting was 
held by Delphian Literary Society- 
Friday evening, February 28th. Th. 
dovitions, conducted by Ruth Shroy 
er, chaplain of the society, centere 
upon the quotation "What will yoi 
do before the day has sunk into Etev 
nity?", and proved to be a thoughtfu 
reminder to any who might be idlin; 
away his time. 

Following this, a humorous pro 
gram, was rendered by a group o 
Freshmen. The main feature was : 
'gym" class composed of Anne Gobi 
Dorothy Forry, Harriet Miller, an 
Augusta Trachte, with Marian Kru 
ger as acting instructor. A series o 
students nd gymnastics, including sev 
eral Danish exercises, were presentee 
in a very hilarious manner, to the 
great delight of the audience. Afte 
a brief business session, the meeting- 
adjourned, until the following Friday 



O 

Dr. and Mrs. Ralph L. Bartlett, for- 
merly Edith Lehman '13, and their 
family are now living in Baltimore 
Maryland. Dr. Bartlett is teaching at 



OPPONENTS TAKE 

FORENSIC VICTORY 

(Continued from Page 1) 



Hershey High School. 

After the debate, the team was en 
tertained in the social room of the 
Y. M. C. A. where an informal recep- 
tion had been preparad. The boys 
team of Elizabethtown College wc:\ 
present, as well as a number of the 
faculty members. 

Although the first debate was not a 
victory, the team is still undaunted 
and with the assistance of Protesso. 
Stokes and Professor Stevenson, they 
are working with more determined 
efforts to show their ability in the 
next debate with Susquehanna on 
March 17th. The next debate sched- 
uled is on Monday, March iotli 
when the negative team of Lebanon 
Valley will vie with the affirmative 
team from Elizabethtown here. A 
good turn-out is requested as these 
teams need your support! 

o 

Baltimore Polytechnic Institute. 
They were prevented from attending 
tthe recent meeting of the Alumni at 
that place because of the illness or 
Mrs. Bartlett. 



V 



Twelve new members of Philo wen 
given their second and third degree; 
last Friday evening February 28 
Luther Rearick, chairman of the 
committee for initiation, set loose th< 
well-fed goat. Blood curdling yell 
and groans affirmed that other am 
far more terrible being were present 
After the twelve iew Philo disciple? 
had withstood torture which migli 
easily turn the soul even of martyrs, 
they were adjudged apostles of Phil 
okosmianism. While refreshments 
were being served impressions of the 
initiation were exchanged. 

At a short business meeting, the 
Philo favor and invitation was defi 
nitely decided upon. 





CONVERSATION 
versus 

PROCRASTINATION 

WE ONCE KNEW a College 
Man who took three weeks to 
write a two-page letter! 

Not that he was cursed with 
inflammatory rheumatism or 
anything like that, no sir. He 
could do the hundred in very nearly 
ten flat; and play as neat a game at 
shortstop as you'd want to see. 

But when it came to answering 
letters from home, it took him a long 
time to make up his mind and a longer 
time to get the words on paper. 
* * * 

Gentlemen, we are agin this Col- 
lege Man's habit of stalling on the 
folks at home. They deserve more 
consideration. Don't say to yourself 
that you haven't the time. It only 
takes a minute to get to the nearest 
telephone! 

TALK, don't balk. A pleas- 
ant chat with the home folks 
takes a lot less time than a letter. 



Just for fun 
Home tonight. 



telephone 



t 




1 




PAGE FOUR 



LA VIE COLLEG1ENNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 6 1930 



F. & M. YIELDS EARLY 

LEAD TO L. V. FOE 

(Continued from Page 1) 



of the first half was io-it, F. and M. 
leading. 

Lebanon Valley began the seconc 1 
half with a rush and the score wa 
tied at 21. From then on the gam 
was nip and tuck. Three times F 
and M. took the lead only to hav 
Lebanon Valley tie the score agai' 
and the latter finally take a lead of 
three points. The local team froze 
the ball and prevented further scorin; 
from either side. 

Each team caged thirteen fieh 
goals, the Lancaster team losing be 
cause of poor foul shooting. No or 
flayer starred, for either side, bu : 
every man did his part. Heller wa, 1 
high scorer with ten points whi'j'e 
Kulp made nine points for F. and M 

The line up: 

LEBANON VALLEY 

G. F. Pt; 

Stewart, rf 215 

Ulrich, rf 3 C 

Shroyer, If 2 i * 

Heller, c 3 4 I< 

Light, rg o c 

Albrght, lg - 3 I 7 

Frcy, rg 00c 

13 7 32 

FRANKLIN and MARSHALL . 

G. F. Pts. 

Border, rf 3 o f 

Johnson, If 3 o ( 

Gainey, c 2 2 t 

Kulp. rg 4 1 r 

Fasnacht, lg 1 

Stanton, lg 1 r 

13 4 3 r 

Referee — Sholl waiter. 

FROS TT H&p-*n RINK 

IN CAGE'S OPENING 

The first half of the Frosh-Ju n'o 
g^me sourded the kneU of the F o- . 
hopes for w'n-"'"g p-> m L ~p-"*"T? 
game m basketball. The Juniors ha*' 
the whole first ha^ to them c e"ve 
running up twenty points to tlv 
Frosh's s : x. In the second half how 
ever, the Frosh, with the insetio 
of a new center, succeeded in kg >r 
ing the score for t hat perk:" '! < 
anced, but could not d'mirv'sh t'.io "ea 
which their class cousins had run u 
in the opening per'od. 

Wood, who played both a devas 
tating offensive and an a : r-t : ght de 
fensive game, was the individual sta 
of the contest totalling sixteen c?ur 
ters. Patrizio is next with four fe*; 
goals and four penalty tosses adding 
in all, twelve points. 

The game featured fast passing b:. 
the Juniors, and clever fumbbng by 
the Frosh. The long shots are stil* 
in vogue and many a 'ringer' was 
made from the opponent's foul line 
The Frosh also succeeded in missing 
every penalty shot awarded them — r 
new record. 




The Filipino Collegians 



FILIPINOS PROMISE 

VARIED PROGRAM 



The last number on this year'e 
itar Course program will be present- 
ed in Engle Hall next Wednesday 
night, March 12 at 8 P. M. This final 
attraction will be the popular musical 
company known as tthe Filipino Col- 
legians. 

From America's far-away island pos 

ess : ons, the Philippines, have com* 
:he native instrumentalists. Their in- 
strumentation is unique, including 

lanjos, bass guitar, mandolins, violin 
and piano. 

Their programs run the musical 
?amut from modern syncopation to 
.he classics. Featured numbers, how- 

ver, are the native melodies of tile 

'hilippine Islands. 

The Filipino Collegians furnish 
■.olid proof that Uncle Sam has per- 
med a rn.'rac'e in his far-eastern 
erritory. All members of the com- 
-any are graduates from their high 
chcols at home, have attended then 

vn modern univers'ties and have al- 
studied in leading institutions in 
he United States. They speak the 
>.g"sh language fluently and are rec- 
ognized as among the best students 
at've or otherwise, in the respective 
nstitiit'Ons with which they' have 



rLEE CLUB SEASON 

OPENS AT HERSHEY 

Last Friday night the .Men's G ee 
Hub gave their first concert, of the 
year in the Hershey High School 
uditorium. The concert was given 
under the auspices of one of the Sun- 
lay School classes of the Hershey 
United Brethern Church. 

The Club's program tlrs year re- 
sembles that of former years but 
greatly surpasses any of the previous 
The program is composed as usual of 
club members, vocal and cornet solos 
and a skit. 

The concert at Hershey was given 
in the usual L. V. C. style and was 
greatly enjoyed by all those who 
heard it. 



E. J. SNAVELY AND COMPANY 

UMBRELLAS, LUGGAGE and SPORTING GOODS 
ATHLETIC EQUIPMENT 
628 Cumberland St. 
LEBANON, PENNA. 



ESBENSHADE'S BOOK STORE 

38 N. 8th St. -:- -:- Lebanon, Pa. 

We appreciate your patronage and invite you to make 
our store your shopping place, your resting place, your 
. visiting place, and the place to meet your friends when 
in Lebanon. 

THE LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE STORE 
J. W. Esbenshade, L. V. '03 Edith S. Esbenshade, L. V. '03 
Ann Augusta Esbenshade, 1 L. V. '32 



been identified since comlig to Amer- 
ica. 

Louis Bason is the manager 01 tiic 
company; other members are his 
brother, P. Biason, E. Tavera, M 
Banbalan and "Flo" Suarez. AH arc 
skilled musicians. 

Included in their repertoire are siicl 
number:, as "The Philippine Ovei 
ture", "Schubert's Serenade"', "Tin 
Indian Love Call", "Philippine Eolen 
Overture' and "Ka'.ikas", a .po'pula 
Philippine March. 

Sing e admission will be 75 cents 
Reserved seat chart will open Mori 
day at 1:15 at Grimm's Book Store. 



PEkKOS 

FLAYER FIANOS 

FLAYER ROLLS 
VICTOR RADIOS 

VECTROLAS 

VICTOR RECORDS 
SHEET MUSiC 

Miller Music Store 

738 Cumberland Street 
Lebanon, Pa. 



SOCIETY PINS 
Rang'ng in Price 
from 
$2.75 PLAIN 
to 

$; 2. jo CROWN SET 



COLLEGE BOOK STORE 



M. H. SMITH 

JEWELER 

Watches at Lowest Prices 
Watch and Clock Repairing 
38 Railroad St. Annville, Pa 



CHER 



HOUSE OF GOOD 



Wm. Penn Highway 
Near Annville 



Meals Served at All I lours 

BANQUETS AND PARTIES 
Our Specialty 



COLLEGE CALENDAR 



St--,,,, E 

a er day, March 7— 

i J-'t^ary Societies' meetings 

|.fun,! ;iy . March 9— 1 

I Y. fit. and Y. W. 

1 Monday, March 10 — >: 

I Debate with Elizabcthtown, atj 

I at home. | 

M luesday, March 11 — 

1 Y. fit. and Y. W Pageant. » 

I .Wed- esday, March 12— I! 

M Star Course— The Phillipincl 

B Collegians. B 

I [hur day, March 1;^ I 

I ■ Debate with Juirata, away. I 

1 L 'Club Infer Class game. 1 

IS Bj 

m ■■ ■ B 
siisisisKiaisiai^^ 



PRINTING 



When you want work 
of the better kind see 

HIESTER— The Print er 



HW MILLER 



I Annville 



HARDWARE 
OF QUALITY 



Pa 



"i^ne assortment of Watches, Ringr-. 

Chains, & etc. 
New Century Chiming Grandfather 
Clocks 

LIGHT'S JEWELRY STORE 
51 West Main St. 



PHOTOGRAPHS 

LIVE FOREVER 

Ulrich's Studio 

820 Cumberland St. 



J, P BERLEW 
DEPARTMENT STORE 

Two Doors From Post Office 

Invites your inspection of 
General Merchandise 



HAVE YOU SEEN 
i he Latest In Die-stamped stationery 
Your Whole Name Forms The 
Design 

COME IN AND SEE IT 

BOLLMANS 

33 South Eighth Street, 
Lebanon, Pa. 



D. RUSSO 

LOOK LOW PRICES LOO 

Men's Half Soles 

& Heeels $1.50 

Men's Half Soles $1.00 

Ladies Half Soles & 

Rubber Heels $i- T S 

Ladis Half Soles 80c. With 

Top. Life $1.05 

Ladies Rubber Heels 

35c Top Lift 25c 

9 E MAIN ST. 
CENTRAL SHOE REPAIRIN 
SHOP 



D. L SAYLOR & SONS 

Contractors 

LUMBER AND COAL 

ANNVILLE. PA. 




PUBLICATION. 
BOOKS, CAT A 
LOGUES, STATION- 
ERY, CARDS, TAGS, 

ANNVILLE PRINTING 
COMPANY 

ANNVILLE PA. 



RUSSEL and SPANGLER 

Our Agents At 
LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 
FINKELSTEIN 
Cleaners & Dyers 

TRY OUR HOME MADE 
SANDWICHES 

QUALITY LUNCH 

BREYER'S ICE CREAM 
A Specialty 

7 E. Main St. Annville, Pa. 



For Quality 



Patronize 



FINK'S BAKERY 

Main Street 



For 

QUALITY PLUS 

in 

Material and Workmanship 
Repairs at Special Rates 
Go To 

ANNVILLE SHOEMAN 

207 W. Main 



HAVE YOU TRIED OUR 20c TOASTED CHEESE 
SANDWICHES? 

THE PENNWAY 

OPPOSITE p. o. 
A FULL LINE OF FRESH PASTRY DAILY 



SIGN UP 
FOR YOUR QUITTIE 
NOW 



It tit Callejiemi 

LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



Hiss Helen Myers, 
Annville* 



"JERUSALEM" 
AND THE EAST 
TUES. MAR. 18 



VOLUME VI 



ANNVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA, THURSDAY, MARCH 13, 1930 



No. 2 



CAGEMEN SEIZE 
ALBRIGHT VICTORY 

HAIRSBREADTH MATCH 
MARKS CLOSE OF 
SEASON 



Lebanon Valley closed its basket- 
ball season with a brilliant victory 
ver their main rival, Albright, by a 
score of 41-40 in the Lebanon High 
gyw, Wednesday, March 5- The 
largest crowd that attended a local 
game this year was thrilled from start 
to finish by a game in which there 
were no dull moments. 

Captain Albright, Ulrich and Shroy- 
er played their last basketball game 
for Lebanon Valley in this contest. 
Ulrich wound up his career in a 
blaze of glory. In the second half of 
the game he dropped shots from all 
angles of the floor and was the main 
cause of victory for L. V. He sunk 
seven field goals and one foul for a 
total of fifteen points, among them 
being a very long shot from the cen- 
ter of the floor. 

"Jap"' Albright also played an ex- 
cellent game in his final. He gath- 
ered twelve points, many of them 
when they were most needed, before 
he was forced out of the game late in 
the second half on personals. He 
played opposite Haines, one of Al- 
bright's biggest threats, and did a 
good job in guarding him. 

The game opened very much in Al- 
bright's favor as Heller collected 
three fouls in the first few minutes 
of play. "Hooks" Mylin removed him 
to save him for the second half, send- 
ing Stewart to center and Ulrich sub- 
stituting for Stewart. Heller's depar- 
ture put fight into Albright and they 
Put on full speed. Lebanon Valley 
kept trailing about six points in the 
re ar mainly through the efforts of 
Stewart at the foul line. The period 
ended with a score of 23-18 in Al- 
bright's favor. 

(Continued on Pa*« 4) 
-O 



STUDENTS WILL AID 
INSTITUTION ABROAD 

"LEBANON VALLEY IN 
AFRICA" DRIVE IS 
LAUCHED TODAY 



EDUCATORS OF SOUTH 

IS GUEST OF Y. W. 



"Industry, honesty, and courtesy 
will win." With this motto deeply 
imbedded within her heart, and with 
the radiance of a consecrated life 
beaming from her eyes, Miss Mary E. 
Moore made her appearance on the 
campus in behalf of the welfare of 
the poor mountain negroes of the 
South. Miss More is a travelling sec- 
retary for the Industrial Educational 
Association, whose headquarters are 
in Washington, D. C, while at the 
same time she is a teacher and super- 
visor of a school for the Colored 
situated near Hiddenite, North Caro- 
lina. She met with the Y. W. C. A. 
Cabinet on Friday evening, and ex- 
plained her mission. 

Realizing the need of her race for 
rudimentary education, vocational 
guidance, and religious training — a 
need which has never been filled by 
the public schools of these mountains 
district — Miss Moore became the 
originator of an institution for the 
advancement of this cause. At first 
the school consisted of a log cabin 
which was highly unsuited for its 
mission, but, through the tireless ef- 
forts of its founder, larger and better 
equipped buildings were gradually 
erected; there is still such a lack of 
funds, however, that the work cannot 
progress as rapidly as it should. 
Eager, longing children clamoring 
for admittance, must they be turned 
away? Teachers are needed. Ten 
fifty-dollar scholarships are bein 
sought at the present time, to meet 
the demand for instructors. It was 
toward this cause that the local Y. W 
C. A. contributed. 

Miss Moore, herself, receives no 
salary; she has given her all to help 
lift her people. 



-O- 



terb 
thi 



Lebanon Valley is joining with Ot- 



ei n and Indiana Central Colleges 
ls , We ek in the annual Internationa 1 
P r °ject of raising funds for Albert 
c adc my i n Africa. As Lebanon 
, alle y launches this drive she takes 
^ r place beside other colleges and 
v ersities who are supporting 
. °°ls in foreign lands such as "Yale 

China" and "Oberlin in China". 
. Lebanon Valley in Africa" or Al- 
l academy requires a total annual 
eet of fourteen thousand dollars 



school must depend for a large 

their 



share 

f r j e OI this amount from 

^ merica - Tt is P r °bably not 
n that the school has an enroll- 
ed °^ ap ' )rox i ma t e iy onc hundred 
eits. The staff including native 
(Continued on Page 4) 



STUDENTS ENJOY 
Y.M.-Y.W- PAGEANT 



The students and friends of Leb 
anon Valley College witnessed a very 
unusual dramatic production on Tues 
day evening March 11, when "The 
Striking of America's Hour" was pre- 
sented by a large cast, under the 
direction of Miss Madeline Rife and 
Mr. Gardner Saylor, both of whom 
delerve commandation for the skill 
ful manner in which the pagent was 
rendered. The affair was sponsored 
by the Y. M. and Y. W. C. A.'s work 
ing harmony with "World's Student 
Christian Federation", an internation 
al association of students. The pagent 
depicted what America is facing to- 
day as a nation. Never before was 
the opportunity for world service and 
influence so great, as at the present 
time. 

The ease with which the numerou 
episodes were presented, the harmony 
of the musical selections, the effec 
tiveness of the character groupings 
the colorfulness of the customes, the 
simplecity of the stage setting, and the 
skiliariness of the actors— all were 
proof of the fact that the directors 
had spared neither time nor effort in 
(Continued on Page 3) 



1931 QUITTIE OPENS 
SALES CAMPAIGN 



STUDENT BODY WILL 
BE SOLICITED 
THIS WEEK 



The sales staff for the 1931 Quitta- 
hahilla has commenced operations! 
The actual signing up of the students 
is being done by a committee of Jun- 
iors headed by Sales Manager Becker, 
and the aim is to sell each studeni 
of L. V. C. a copy of the 1931 annual. 

Following a short chapel an 
nouncement by the editor on Tues- 
day morning, the sales manager in- 
vited the cooperation of the student 
body in making this year's Quittie a 
complete success. It is the intention 
of the staff to publish the results of 
the sales campaign each week in the 
columns of LA VIE. 

Since the book is a student project, 
and since all students are mutually 
concerned in its success, the Junior 
Class is quite confident of a rapid 
sell out. 

O • 



I COLLEGE CALENDARS 



g Friday, March 14 — Literary Soci • j|j 
I eties; Kalo-Clio joint session. |jj 

I Saturday, March 15 — Debate, Gen-@ 

S eva, at home, 8:30 P. M. 

§1 IH1 

So w . ^ • m 

3 Sunday, March 16 — Y meetings || 

§j IS 

I Monday, March 17 — Debate, Sus-H 

|j quehanna, at home. 

§1 Tuesday, March 18 — L Club Trav 

m 1 

a elog. 

^sisasiissisigiBiisiiiaEiiaiiaisisiiaiaisiiaiaigiiKii 



L. V. COEDS BOW TO 
ALBRIGHT TOSSERS 



FILIPINOS CLOSE 
STAR COURSE SEASON 



DISPLAY OF MUSICAL 
TALENT DELIGHTS 
ANDIENCE 



On Wednesday evening, March 12, 
the last number of the 1929-30 star 
course features was given in the En- 
gle Conservatory at eight o'clock 
This number was one of the clever- 
ests and most entertaining of all. Any- 
one who has any ear for music what- 
soever could not fail to be delighted 
by the charm and talent of the Fil- 
ipino Colligiate quintet. Not only 
w r ere the young men skilled in handl- 
ing their instruments, but they varied 
the program so deaverly that every 
spectator was delighted by the pre- 
sentation. The numbers rendered 
had widespread appeal, and brought 
to life all the mystery and romance 
of the tropics. All enjoyed the little 
sketch which was used to add a 
touch of humor to the program. The 
boys surely "knew 7 their tunes". 

Such versatility demonstrated by 
the five young men from across the 
Pacific is significant, especially after 
the rendition of the impresive pageant 
of the night before. These "peppy" 
and active Collegians show that the 
United States can be proud of her 
interest in the Philippine Islands. 

-o- 



WELL-PLAYED GAME 
ENDS SUCCESSFUL 
SEASON 



DEBATERS SCORE 
FIRST VICTORY 

DEBATERS SCORE 

FIRST VICTORY 



JUDGES AWARD 2 TO 
DECISION TO L. V. 
NEGATIVES 



1 



HIGH ALTITUDES FOR 
YALE 



The students of Yale University 
were honored by receiving the first 
individual attention from aviation. An 
innovation has also been made which 
may become quite popular! A field 
near New Haven has been procured 
where students may lodge private 
olanes and spec ; al rates have been se- 
cured for flights to games or for p 1 *r»" 
ure "hop-offs." Now watch out for 
high-flyers! 



The Lebanon Valley sextette o 
'basketball toters' bowed down in de- 
feat to the Red and White flashes ol 
Albright in a fast-moving game 
Wednesday evening, March 5, in the 
Lebanon High gymnasium. 

Both teams opened with a spurt, but 
Albright plunged ahead and at the 
end of the first half, the score stood 
15-5 in her favor. 

In the second half of the game the 
Lebanon Valley team came bad- 
"strong"'. Albright was unable tc 
score and their lead was soon dimiri 
ished to two points. The last few 
minutes of' the game were fast and 
furious, and at the final blow of the 
whistle, the score stood 26-23 in favc 
of Reading. 

Viugst scored high for Annville 
bringing in 15 of the 23 points; Read- 
ing's star forward was Mosser, annex- 
ing 18 of the 26 points. 

This game "marks the end of the 
girl's basketball season and though 
a defeat, was well played and showed 
a capably organized team. 

The line-up: 



On Monday evening, March 10th, 
in Philo Hall, L. V.'s negative team 
successfully defeated the affirmative 
team of Elizabethtown College, witli 
a two to one decision by the judges. 
The question under debate was: Re- 
solved that the U. S. should with- 
draw fro m the Kellog Peace Pact. 

The question was handled convinc- 
ingly by both sides. The affirmative 
team had their documentary evidence 
at their finger tips and tried to show- 
that the pact was weak, meaningless, 
vague, ineffective, and; lacked defini- 
tion of terms. It would make the 
U. S. the dupe of Europe and would 
involve our country in undesirable 
European affairs. The negative team 
pointed out that withdrawal on our 
part would put the U. S. in a ques- 
tionable position, and that there was 
no reason that would warrant our 
withdrawal! The withdrawal of the 
U. S. would lead other nations to 
think they had the same right. 

The judges were Miss Appel, Ann- 
ville High School, Dr. Spessard, of 
the Reformed Church, and Mr. Van 
Kuren, principal of the Harding Jun- 
ior High School, Lebanon. Profes- 
sor Stevenson acted as chairman. 

The members of the affirmative 
team were Alverta Lecrone, Ruth 
Henry, and Flay Schlasser, with Mar- 
guerite Garrett, alternative. 

The speaker of the negative team 
were Martha Daley, Gerald Heilman, 
and Russel Etter. Helen Franklin 
rebutted in Miss Miss Daley's place. 

O 

L CLUB TO PRESENT 
TRAVELOUGE 



LEBANON VALLEY 

G. F. Pts. 



Yingst, rf 7 1 

Clark, If 1 3 

Rice, If 1 1 

March, c o o 

Hershey, sc o o 

Armacost, sc o o 

Cochran, rg o o 

Rupp, lg o o 



ALBRIGHT 



G. P. Pts. 



Moosser, rf 5 8 

Detterline, If 4 

Bininger, c - o o 

Wiilkes, sc o 

Porter, rg o o 

Deck, lg o o 

Referees — Graeff and Zerbe. 



Through the efforts of the Varsity 
L Clug, Stephen A. Haboush, lecturer 
of rare eloquence, will present a trav- 
elogue, "Jerusalem and the East," in 
the Engle Conservatory, Tuesday 
evening, March 13th. 

Mr. Haboush was horn on the Hills 
of Galilee. He was raised among 
shepherds in the hills that witnessed 
the unfolding of Christianity. He was 
educated abroad and in America. Mr. 
Haboush has also travelled extens- 
ively. 

His travelogue will depict scenes in 
Damascus, the Sea of Galilee, ancient 
and modern Jerusalem, and other his- 
torical spots. Some of the travel- 
ogue will have musical settings, which 
will be played by Mrs. Haboush. 

Admission will be fifty cents. Tick- 
ets may be secured from members of 
the L Club. They urgently request 
the support of the student body. 

On Sunday evening, March 16th, 
Mr. Haboush will speak in the Col- 
lege church. His talk will be on 
26' "My Shepherd Life in Galilee." 



RAGE TWO 




LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 13, 1930 
■ ■ ■ .... _ -. . 



ESTABLISHED 1925 

A weekly publication by the Under* 
graduate Students of Lebanon 
Valley College 

EDITORIAL STAFF 

Russel Etter, '31 Editor-in-Chief 

Ruth Liller, '31 Associate Editor 

R. Roudabush, '31 .... Associate Editor 
R .Morgan, '31 .... Managing Editor 

KSFOBTOBIAL STAFF 

Robert Eshleman, '31 

Madeline Sheddy, '31 

Ruth Shroyer, '32 

Hilda Buckley, '32 

Walter Krumbeigel, '33 ., 

General Reporters 

Mary Goshert, '32 Conservatory 

Robert Rawhouser, '32 Athletics 

Dorothy Garber, '32 Clionian 

Mary Epply, '32 Delphian 

Percy Clements, '33 Kalozetean 

Fred Mund, '32 Philokosmian 

Edna Early, '31 .... Alumni Reporter 

BU SIN ESS STAFF 

G. Becker, '31 .... Business Manager 
P. Keene, '32 Asst. Business Managei 
C. Wise, '31 .... Circulation Manager 

FACULTY ADVISORS 

Dr. Paul A. W. Wallace, English Dept. 
Miss Mary EL Wallace, English Dept. 
Dr. Paul S. Wagner. Math. Dept. 

LA VIE COLLEGIENNE. a member 
of the Intercollegiate Newspaper Asso- 
ciation of the Middle Atlantic States. 

Single Copies 10 cents 

Subscription $1.50 per year 

Entered at the Annville, Pa., post- 
office as second class matter under the 
Act of March 3. 1879. 



BACK THE SENATE! 

The past week saw another attempt 
at a meeting of the Men's Senate. 
They met and transacted business, 
but they did it half-heartly. Why? 
Simply because the men refuse to 
back them. Many a time-honored 
institution has died over night because 
the people who were responsible foi 
its existence and w'no should have 
been its strongest backers turned out 
to be the loudest knockers. Is this 
to be the fate of the Senate? 

Listen, men, its time to do some 
thinking, all of us, Seniors as well as 
Freshmen. If we get behind the sen- 
ate and help it enforce its rules in- 
stead of laughing at its attempts to 
maintain order something worthwhile 
can be done on the campus. But il 
our present attitude of cynical, sneer- 
ing criticism continues, it cannot be 
expected to funtlon properly. 

The work must begin first among 
the upper-classmen. Every last one 
of them must recognize his respon- 
sibility to the Senate and make him- 
self amenable to it. Example is more 
powerful than precept. If upper- 
classmen and Sophomores refuse to 
obey the rules, Freshman are bound 
to follow the lead. If Seniors sneer, 
Freshman are sure to rebel. 

We all need to recognize the value 
of discipline. We live in a world when 
we must brush shoulders with mil- 
lions of others, each with his own 
rights and privileges. All the know- 
ledge of science, mathematics, Greek, 
t or philosophy are worthless if we 
fail to learn how to fill our place in 
society. We all need to be govern- 
ed to have the limits of our rights 
prescribed, but when we delegate that 
authority to a body of representatives 
and then proceed to resist the efforts 
of that body, failure Is the inevitable 
result. These are facts which the 
Freshman will realize much more 
fully in later years. Every first year 
man enters Lebanon Valley or any 
other school with a great many rough 
spots that need to be smoothed off. 
Cooperation is absolutely necessary 
if that roughness is to be removed. 

After all, men, the point is just 
this. We all wish to do our share in 
making Lebanon Valley a good school 
We want to see her succeed in ail 
her undertakings; her failure would 



shame us as much as anyone. Every 
last man upon entering this institu- 
tion, agreed to submit to the author- 
ity of the Senate. Every year we 
renew that pledge. Are we men of 
our word? Do we really have a sense 
of honor that will bring us tc the 
task? Those are the questions we 
must answer Let's answer them in 
real Blue and White fashion. The 
Senate is ours; let's back it. 

O 

THE OLD REFRAIN 



"The old order changeth" — but not 
so fast as might be desired, not near- 
ly so fast in some instances. For sev- 
eral years, for instance, the practice 
of throwing all kinds of refuse on the 
campus in front of the men's dormi- 
tory has persisted in spite of the 
remonstraces of those who have the 
interests of thes chool at heart. Why 
that practice should persist is an open 
question. One can readily understand 
why a citizen of Athens should throw 
the remains of his dinner into the 
middle of the street; he didn't know 
any better. But why a group of in- 
telligent young men (and we chal- 
lenge anyone to prove that it is not an 
intelligent group) should litter the 
campus of their Alma Mator with 
"Camel" stubs, "Prince Albert" tins, 
scraps of blue-books, bits of broken 
glass-ware, etc., etc., is more than 
we can fathom. 

If there were a deficiency of recep- 
tacles for this, waste, some excuse 
might be found for such conduct. 
But we have a lurking suspicion that 
such is by no means the case. Of 
course, it supplies a dirty job for the 
Freshman and has its advantages in 
that respect, but couldn't someone 
suggest ' something original, some- 
thing that's not quite so downright 
disgusting to people with a sense of 
decency and order. Really, this sort 
of thing just isn't done at Lebanon 
Valley in other matters. It is con- 
trary to the very spirit of the inst- 
tution. Our pride in our Alma Mater 
ought to be sufficient of itself to put 
an end to this sort of advertising. 
Lets be charitable and just charge it 
up to thoughtlessness, men, but let's 
think it over. 

O 



SPEAKERS APPRECIATED 



The students of Lebanon Valley 
have indeed been fortunate in having 
the privelege of hearing so many ex- 
cellent speakers this year. People 
from all walks of life, representing 
many institutions have been obtain- 
ed through the efforts of the Star 
Course Committee. In addition to 
interesting Chapel talks, very instruc- 
tive conference sessiois were held by 
hese men and women. That they 
have been thoroughly appreciated by 
the students is self-evident on the 
campus. 

The question is raised by some, 
however, as to the value of these 
speakers. Are their effort worthy of' 
the time and expense devoted to 
them? The question is an open one, 
of course, but we choose to adopt the 
affirmative point of view. Our reas- 
ons are two-fold. In the first place 
they have helped to give us the inter- 
national outlook. It is sufficient to 
observe in this connection that we 
have had speakers from India, Africa, 
Austrialia, the Phillipines, and Amer- 
icans who have travelled extensively 
The importance of cultivating the 
international outlook in our present 
day world is obvious. 

In addition, these speakers have 
helped us to see more clearly the prac- 
tical aspects of life. The regularcur- 
iculum is apt to make one just a bit 
too "bookish" and impractical. We 
need to face the actualities of the 
world around us, and this we have 
been aided in doing by these excel- 
lent speakers. It is sincerely hoped 
that the same policy will be pursued 
in the future. 



SOPHOMORES TRL71 

CLASS COUSINS 

The Sophs defeated the Seniors in 
a fast game 39-18 last Thursday 
night to gain their place in a three 
way tie for the leadership of the inter- 
class league. The game was one o. 
the roughest seen in the Alumni 'gym 
this year. Ray Pickle started tin 
Sophs on their way to victory b} 
sinking a field goal, and a foul shot 
within the first minute of play. This 
gave the Sophs a three point lead and 
they were never overtaken. They dis- 
played a fine passing attack and thv 
best team work used by any class 
team this season. The Seniors seem- 
ed completely lost, due to the absence 
of two of their regulars. Their of- 
fence was ragged and their defense 
could not stop the scoring combina- 
tion of the second-year men. Ray 
Pickle was high scorer of the evening 
with six field goals and two fouls, 
making a total of fourteen points. 
Barnhart led the Seniors with ten o 
his teamfs eighteen points. Lechtha 
ler, who played a fine game at guan 
for the Sophs, until removed on ac- 
count of fouls, scored ten points and 
Shortlcdge was close behind him witl 
nine. The Sophs led at the half- 
time 17-6. 

Line up: 

SENIORS 

G. F. Pts. 

Cunja'Jk, rf 02; 

Barnhart, If 3 4 ir 

Hertzler, c 3 ° ' 

Gachifano, rg o o c 

Bendigo, lg o o c 

Myers, rg — o o r 

6 6 li 

SOPHS 

G. F. Pts 

Shortledge, rf 4 1 £ 

Pickle, If 6 21 

Salik, c I , .0 I 

McCusker, rg 204 

Lectha'er, lg 5 o ic 

Koffer, c o r 

Kinney, lg o o c 




18 3 3? 



-O- 




Ori the evening of February 28, 
'Qi6 the c'ass of 1918, then Sopho- 
mores, held a banttet at the Werne; 
Tote 1 . Lebanon. This was an entirely 
lew undertaking at Lebanon Valley: 
e'"otofore it was customary tr 
hold out-of-town banquets only in the 
Freshman year. The affair was a 
great success and the members of the 
c'ass were very glad that they had 
'Ucceeded in making all the arrange- 
ments for the banquet unknown to the 
other classes. 

As usual they had a sumptuous 
f east and afterward a short program 
consisting of toasts and short talks. 
O 

Mr. Raymond Kock, of the class 
of '28. who is teaching at Tlermma 
Pa., spent the week-end with his par- 
ents at Palmyra. 

Mr. John Beatty, '29 and H. H 
Hovis '29 were also visitors on the 
canlpUS over the week-end. 

M : ss Viola Deitrick '29, who i? 
now teaching English in the West 
Chester High School, spent the week 
end at her home. 

O ■ 

Mr. Lloyd S. Bowman '26 and Mis; 
Lela Gipson were married January 
12, 1930 at Freetown, Sierra Leone 
West Africa. • Mrs. Bowman, who for 
merly lived in lnd : ana. is a teacher in 
the School for Girls, Moyamba, Sier- 
ra Leone. Mr. Bowman is head o' 
the Printing and Manual Training 
Shop at Albert Academy. 

Mr. Ira Ruth '23, and Miss E. Vir- 
ginia Smith were married Saturday 
March 1, at Mt. Gretna, Pennsyl 
vania. 



Among Our Seniors 




GEORGE FREDERICK RHOADS 



"Dusty" is one of the few men on 
the campus who have succeeded in 
eluding the 'boy with the bow' up to 
their senior year, and were it not 
tor a brief moment when the arrow 
grazed him last Fall, he would have 
had a clean slate, but alas 'tis tar- 
nished. 

George Frederick, however, has 
more serious interests. His mana- 
gerial duties, being manager of both 
basketball and baseball, occupy all 
the time that can be devoted to ex- 
tra curricular activities. Neverthe- 
less he did succeed in 'taking time 
out' for the Delphian Anniversary 
play, "The Truth." His ability in 
enacting the role of Mr. Roland 
proved him quite a thespian. But 
"Dusty" craves to be neither managei 
of an athletic squad nor an actor; he 
has chosen teaching as his vocation. 

Being an extremely busy man, he 
has given up agitating, though pre- 
vious to basketball season be had a 
hand in most of the excitement na- 
tive to the dorm, including the 'mur- 
der'. Nevertheless he is a genial ano 
convivial fellow and his occasional 
outbursts of invective are only hu- 
mane. 



RUTH EVELYN MARCH 



You know her? Of course; y OU 
can't help it. Ruth is on of the most 
active young women on the campus 
always rushing to and fro, yet always 
smiling. Looking at last years "Quit* 
tie" we wonder how she managed 
some of her accomplishments. Dur- 
ing her 'Froshl' days she warbled 
witn the Eurydice Choral Club, played 
class basketball and was her society 
warden. Thus it was, all through 
the years. At various times she be- 
longed to the Hiking Club, was her 
class secretary and Vice-President 
and served on many committees for 
ner society. 

Now Ruth is in her last year. No 
doubt she is sorry to leave us, but 
word has reached our ears that she 
rejoices in the fact that there only one 
more 'exam' to take. Though we can 
normally concede an aversion for ex- 
aminations we did not think it applied 
to Ruth who is said to be quite profi- 
cient with the books. Verily 'tis a 
paradox. 

Has she athletic honors? Don' esk! 
Have you ever seen a girls' basket- 
ball game? If so you know the stel- 
lar game she plays at center. But 
this is not all. Nay, nay, she also 
manages the squad. 



DRAMA STUDENTS SEE 

"AS YOU LIKE IT' 



On Saturday March 8, Dr. Wallace 
motored to Philadelphia to witness 
the dramatization of "As You Like 

It" as interpreted by Fritz Leiber 
and his company. The students who 

had witnessed either "Hamlet" 01 
"The Taming of the Shrew" or both 
were so enthused about Fritz LeiberV 
performance that there was no dif- 
ficulty whatsoever to get enough 
students to accompany Dr. Wallace. 
Those who were fortunate enough to 
attend the drama were: Helen Hain. 
Elizabeth LeFever, Mary Ax, Paul 
Evancoe, and Dr. Wallace. 

This play, however, did not quite 
meet the expectations of those who 
attended, altho' the roles were quite 
well portrayed, Celia and Rosalind 
being about the best, a few of the 
spectators were disappointed that Fritz 
Leiber assumed the character of 
Jacques instead of Orlando. A num- 
ber of Jacque's speeches were elimin- 
ated for dramatic utility, it was 
thought, but the result was not en- 
tirely pleasing. However, the part of 
Rosalind was assumed by Miss Vir- 
ginia Bronson, who is considered one 
of Fritz Leiber's best actresses. She 



had the role of Bianca in "The Tam- 
ing of the Shrew". As a whole th« 
play was not quite up to par and it 
is believed that Fritz Leiber merely 
put 0V1 !this dramatization (because 
the public wished it, and that ordin- 
arily it is not included in his usual 
repertoire. As is true of all his play, 
the color schemes were gorgeous and 
the swift movement upon the stage 
produced a beautiful kaleidoscopic 
array of color. The glamour of the 
Forest of Ardcn, that dream-like at- 
mosphere was retained as well as 
could be expected upon the stage. 
Altho' the play was not perfect in 
entirety the power of indivual lines 
soliloquy of Jacques — "all the worlds 
a stage" — which was magnificently 
handled by Fritz Leiber. 

O . 



Interesting information has j ust 
been discovered about newspapers. 
In every newspaper column there ar 
10,000 pieces of type. Now each letter 
may be put in at least seven wronb 
positions, in addition to 70,000 chances 
for making errors and millions °* 
chances for transpositions. Just in 
that short grouping, "To Be or N ot 
to Be", 2,759,022 errors are possib e - 
Astounding? — well, rather! 



—Shaeffer's Lifetime Pens — 

NONE BETTER ABSOLUTELY GUARANTEED 

AN EVERYDAY NECESSITY FOR 
COLLEGE STUDENTS 

The Gift Store of Lebanon 
757-759 Cumberland Street 



HARPEL'S 




LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 13, 1930 



PAGE THREE 



ou 
ost 
us, 
lys 
tit- 
led 
ur- 
led 
■cd 
sty 
igh 
be- 
ler 
ent 
for 

No 
>ut 
she 
)ne 
:an 
ex- 
ied 
)fi- 



sk! 

tel- 
But 
.lso 



wi- 
th? 
1 it 
ely 
use 
lin- 
ual 
lay. 
and 
age 
pic 
the 
at- 
as 

ge- 
in 
nes 
•Ids 
itly 



just 
ers. 
are 
tter 
ong 
ices 
o* 
in 
Not 



D i 



'A COLLEGE JOKE TO CURE THE 'BLUES' " 

— Jonathan Swift. 



Prof. Stephenson — And the Pope slipped up behind Charlemagne and 
crowned him. Don't you think that indicated collusion? 
BiHie Coleman — Wasn't it more likely Collision? 

—LVC— 

Jacks (in Bible 54) — The cupbearer tasted the wine before the king so it 
would poison him. That's the way they killed the kings in those days. 

— LVC— 

Edna Early (on way to Clio) — Oh, I've forgotten my collection. 

—LVC— 

The Dolly Gann social rumpus in Washington seems to be a matter ot 
wife and death. 

—LVC— 

F re d — .Who was that peach you were with last night? 
Cal — She may look like a peach but 1 call her a grapefruit. 
Fred— Why? 

Cal — Because whenever I squeeze her I get a sock in the eye. 

— LVC— 

Frosty Peters — I've decided to stop using mascara. Life is too sad. 

—LVC— 

Incidentally did you hear about the fellow who joined the navy to see 
the world and then was placed on a submarine? 

—LVC— 

Parsons — Are you familiar with any medical terms? 

Greiner— Yes, two. 'Shake well before using', and 'five dollars, please.' 

—LVC— 

Disraeli said that 'the man who never makes jokes is a standing one.' 

— LVC— 

A green little Frosh 

In his green little way, 
Ate a green little apple 

One summer day. 

Now the green little grasses 
Tenderly wave, 

' t O'er the green little freshman's 

Green little grave. 

—LVC— 

Bill Lehman — Where did you get that black eye? 
Bud Hoy— That's a berth mark. 
Bill— A birth mark? 

Bud— Yes, I climbed into the wrong berth. 



-LVC— 



It would hav 



The trouble with psittacosis is that it has come too late 
e d so nicely into cross-word puzzles. 

— LVC— 

B ELIEVE IT OR NOT— 

Marlin Miller thinks a sea plane is what a ship carpenter uses. 
Fernsler wonders how all the telephone poles grew in a straight line. 
Mildred Myers thinks that pasteurize means to see something go by. 
^Frantz's idea of a good racket is selling cream separators on the Milky- 
Mary Showers says that the 'Reds' are usually led by women because 
Cy don't know any better. 

Pharaoh's daughter sang, 'Love sends a little gift of Moses.' 
P( % Schaeffer thinks that Vitaphones are what we get by eating spinach. 
Coll y Ford has created a fund of one million dollars to be used to ht 
'ege students for life after college. That ought to buy a lot of garters and 



PHI LAMBDA SIGMA 

True to form, Philo presented a 
well-balanced program on Friday- 
evening. The meeting proved to be 
of interest to the members and was 
beneficial as well as interesting. 

The new chaplain, Harry Zech, cen 
tered his remarks on thoughts from 
Proverbs III, and then led in prayer. 
William Myers opened the program 
proper, by showing why "March is a 
Month of Interest." Among othei 
things he mentioned St. Patrick's Da} 
and the first day of spring, but above 
all in interest to the students of L. 
V. C. were the F. & M. and Albrigh. 
victories. Kraybill, at the p'ano, theii 
furnished the audience with some 
'Musical Moments" by playing a de 
ightful selection entitled "Manitou.' 

In an interesting dissertation on 
The St. Lawrence Project", Luther 
Rearick proved himself an able econ- 
omist. He showed the advantages it 
relieving traffic, reducing transporta- 
tion costs, and producing water powei 
by constructing a canal from the 
Great Lakes to the Atlantic Ocean 
Robert Rawhouser in his usual com- 
posed way showed himself a well 
read math "shark" by giving the 
boys "High Points in the History oi 
Mathematics." He gave many verj 
interesting sidelights on the subject 
In the last number John Hughes 
showed the place of "Astronomy in 
Modern Life"'. He explained the 
wonders of the universe, told of b 
ing hit by a meteor, and fully con- 
vinced the boys that knowledge oi 

stronomy is useful when courting 
young lady. 

O 

KAPPA LAMBDA SIGMA 



ability were displayed as the girls ren : 
dered musical selections, enteree. 
cake-eating" contests, and acted the 
Oles of salesman and beggar, alike. 
A Chinese Honeymoon'' sung in 
unison by the group, brought iln. 
part of the program to a cio^c. 

A final episode in the evening t 
entertainment was the playing of a 
game, entitled "Going to Jerusalem,' 
Inch furnished laugnter and amuse 
ment to all. 

Those represented in the program 
were Bernita Strebig, Heien Hana 
Kitty" Hagner, "Joe" bchell, EtLe 
Le Van, Elizabeth Ulrich, "Betty" L 
Fevre, Mary Bixler, Anna Garbei, 
Marie Gelwicks, i ruia Koch, Marioi. 
Kruger, Gretna Drawbaugh, Held 
Franklin, Harriet Miller, and Augusta 
frachte. 

Before adjourning for the evening 
t was unanimously decided to accep. 
the proffered invitation to a "joint 
session" with the Philokosm.an Liter 
ary Society, on Friday, March 21. 
U 

KAPPA LAMBDA NU 



The Kalozetean Literary Society 
put on a varied program consisting 
of music, humor and oratory at their 
regular meeting last Friday evening 
Devotions were led by John Morris 
the society chaplain. A series oi 
snappy musical numbers were ren 
dered by "Eggie" Shroyer and 
"Corker" Becker in the form of 
sax-guitar duet. Mr. Alfred Ewait 
Kuhnert then gave a talk that win 
long be remembered by his intent 
listeners. His subject was "The Three 
Most Important Things in a College 
Education." His view was extreme 
ly personal, in that athletics, books 
and social activities were his choic 
in the order named. Alfred, being 
true lover of physical fitness, urged 
that more care be taken by individ 
uals in their everyday life. He told 
of the dangers that would surely b 
encountered if too much time was 
given to the books. "Vim, Vigor and 
Vitality," said Mr. Kuhnert, "is what 
every successful college student must 
have." His speech was no doubt the 
feature of the evening. Morton Early 
gave the latest jokes in an original 
composition entitled "A Bit of Laugh 
ter." A musical selection by Mr 
Becker completed the program. 

A short business meeting was also 
held, and it was definitely decided 
that the date of the Kalo anniversary 
would be changed from Friday, Apri 
4 th to Saturday, April 5th, due to 
conflict with the Alumni banquet. 

-O 

DELTA LAMBDA SIGMA 



lb 



T 



en scars make a man. Ask "Sonny" Russell. 

—LVC— 

He found a little homeless dog, 

A measley little bum, 
And, as he led him home, he said, 
"The wurst is yet to come." 



On Friday evening, March the ?tl 
the members of Delphian Literary 
Society participated in a very original 
program. "The Lord's Prayer" 
the subject discussed and comment 
?d upon by the chaplain of the soci 
ety, during the devotional period. 

Immediately following this, was 
recreational program in charge of 
"uillie" Coleman; an outstanding fea 
ture was a series of vaudeville stunt 
in which all members present tool- 
part. The talent and wit of the soci 
ety were brought into play in the va- 
rious acts presented, and no small 
amount of imitative and imaginative 



Clio's program of Friday Night wa. 
well suited to the March weather, i lu 
first number was an assembly of tlu 
winds. |)o^othy Snyder, as Kin^ 
Aeolus, conferred with the various 
winds, represented by Marion May, 
Dorothy Gable, and Luella Umber- 
ger, and found only one favorable 
one: Zephyrus, which brings the 
warm weather and budding flowers 
The title of the next number, "The 
March Hare" proved to be deceiving 
for Mae Fouth and Catherine Gock 
eley demonstrated the reactions o 
the winds on different kinds of hair 
cuts. 

From Leonora Bender and Meriam 
Silvius, the society learned the cam- 
pus gossip which the March winds 
ushered in. 

O 

i Continued from Page I) 
WELL-COACHED C A S 1 
PRESENT VARIED 
PROGRAM 



their preparations, and that they had 
the cooperation of the group with 
whom they were working. 

The program opened with the fol- 
lowing piano selections, played by 
Mr. Robert Eshelman: "Romance" b) 
Sibelius, "In the Usual Way" by Ter 
gus, and "Le Cavalier Fantistique' 
Iby Godard. In each of these Mr 
Eshelman proved himself the skillfu 
pianist, whose interpretations delight 
ed his audience, and lent a light touch 
of gayety, which was in direct con- 
trast to the serious theme of the pag 
eant. Following this, Miss Mildred 
Myers and Miss Hilda Hess displayed 
their musical talent in an organ-pianc 
duet which was greatly enjoyed. A 
Vinal organ selection was rendered 
by Miss Myers, after which "The 
Striking of America's Hour" wa? 
presented. 

The characters were well choser 
for their indivudal parts, and, in the 
numerous scenes, proved themselves 
commendable actors. A unique feature 
was furnished throughout the pageant 
by the trumpeters, Messers. Pau 
Keene and Kenneth Wanghtel, whe 
accurately summoned the past nation? 
of the world, to the judgement tria 
which was being conducted by tlv 
■•"Spirit of Brotherhood", "Liberty" 
and "Justice". 

Outstanding pieces of character 
work were disp'ayed by the represent 
atives of the fallen nations of anti 
quity. We were carried back to tin 
vast deserts, and g : ant pyram'ds o r 
Egypt, as Mary Ann Rupp told 
a brilliant, flashing manner, of tin 
contributions of her people. We 
were reminded of the splendid pal- 
aces and "hanging gardens" of ancien' 
Babylon as Woodrow Dellinger spok. 
in. behalf of this nation. We wer. 
led to think of beauty in every con 
ceivable form and shape, in paintings. 



in literature, in sculpture, and in 
architecture, as Hariet Miller related 
the part played by Greece in the c'v- 
ilization of the world. We were 
transported in thought to magnificent 
Rome, the mistress of the universe 
for so many years, as William Barnes 
describing the conquering power ot 
this mighty nation of the past. With 
a start we were brought, face to face, 
with our own modern Amerca and 
her ceaseless round of activities, tur- 
moil, and unrest, as Ruth Shroyer 
interpreted the spirit of our own land. 

With great dignity and solemnity, 
the judgements were pronounced 
upon the various nations as Eva Peck 
in the role of "Justice" proclaimed 
them "weighed in the balances and 
found wanting"; as Mary Elizabeth 
Stephens, in the role of "Liberty", 
cast them aside because they had 
failed "to make their people free": 
and finally, as Pauline Shaeffer, in 
the outstanding role "The Spirit or 
Brotherhood" denounced them be- 
cause they had failed "to send out 
the true light to .lighten the world". 
America, alone, is saved from these 
terrible denunciations, but she is in- 
dicted in the name of illiteracy, pover- 
ty, aid child-labor; She is confront- 
ed with her past ideals in the forms 
of the native Indians, the traditional 
Pioneers, and the early, enslaved neg- 
roes; she is confronted with the pres- 
ent ideals in the forms of the im- 
migrants, the child-laborers, and the 
numerous Foreign Nations of the 
world. 

A fitting conlcusion was reached 
when Dorothy Heister and Kermit 
Taylor interpreted the roles of "Doc- 
ter" and "Nurse", sent out to heal 
the physical suffering of the world; 
and, also by Marian Kruger, who in 
the charming role of "Play", lifted 
up the child-laborers and brought 
them into a delightful realm of child- 
hood freedom. 

In the final episode, "Liberty" 
voiced her desire to be called "Christ- 
ian Liberty'", realizing that there is 
no liberty save the Liberty where- 
with Christ has made men free. She 
directed "America" to the cross, and 
teh scene closed with the singing of 
"In the Cross of Christ I Glory", 
with all hand uplifted towards the 
object of their song. 



O- 



FRESHMEN HOLD 



BANQUET 



Last Saturday March 8, the Fresh- 
man class held the traditional class 
banquet at the Weimar Hotel in Leb- 
anon. It was an extremely successful 
event even though a few members 
were detained for a while by the 
Sophs. This incident however, lent 
spice to the affair. 

The banquet which was held in the 
large ballroom of the hotel was also 
attended by Rev. Jones who was the 
main speaker, Professor Stokes who 
gave a few Canadian Cracks, Pro- 
fessor Fields who commended the 
'bright and shinning faces' and Miss. 
Fencil who acted as chief chaperone. 

Lee Jay Stone acted as toastmas- 
ter an introduced the participants oi 
the program. Miss Trula Kock was 
the first speaker and gave us 'Bub- 
bles'. Mr. Koslusky, chairman of the 
committee, followed with a few du- 
bious jokes. Next the president of 
the class, Mr. Shellenberger enter- 
tained with appropriate 'wise ones'. 
And to change the program Miss. 
Kathryn Lutz deigned a song. This 
. was followed with the speeches by 
the members of the faculty and Rev. 
Jones. To conclude the program, 
Clarence Early and Marian Kruger 
put on a skit with popular music. 

The remainder of the evening was 
given over to the phonograph. At 
midnight the party dispersed, as is 
customary. 



PAGE FOUR 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 13, 1930 



RAILROAD OFFICIAL 

ADDRESS STUDENTS 



Last Thursday afternoon Mr. J. M. 
Fitzgerald, who is the assistant to 
the Chairman of the committee on 
Public Relations of the Eastern Rail- 
ways and (former president of the 
Western Maryland Railroad, address- 
ed a class in Transportation, in Philo 
Hall. Previous to that he had given 
a fifteen minute talk at luncheon. 

Mr. Fitzgerald spoke on the present 
conditions and influences of railways 
and gave the reasons for the various 
declines in the departments of rail- 
way transportation. 

"The decline of passenger service 
for short hauls" he said, "is not due 
to the competition of the omnibus, 
but rather to the use of motor cars. 
The people who possess automobiles, 
do not think as much of a two hund- 
red mile or even a further trip, as 
they formerly did with the result that 
short haul work has been much af- 
fected. 

"Another item which creates con- 
siderable expense is providing the 
maximum of comfort for the passen- 
ger. This move was nescessitated by 
the competition among companies." 
Herehe cited the luxuries that had 
been installed; soda fountains; mo- 
tion pictures; ladies smoking rooms 
and radios which afford dancing in 
the observation-car. Then he touched 
on government ownership. 

"The failure of the United States 
to run a railroad successfully during 
the war and the deplorable condition 
in which they were returned to theii 
owners clearly showed the impracti- 
bility of government ownership." He 
also gave England as another ex- 
ample of the failure of ownership. 

He does not deem the canals an 
asset to our nation and cited the case 
of the Ney York Barge Canal. This 
canal, he said, carries more Canadian 
grain than it does America and hense 
is of little value to the American far- 
mer. Of the possibilities of air trans- 
portation, he says. 

"The airplane, I think will never be 
a factor in bulk transportation, but 
will be extreemly important where 
speed is essential. However, air 
transportation may still be said to 
be in an experimental stage as it is 
only in the last ten years that profit 
has been derived from it." 

Concerning the effect of omnibuses 
upon railways he explained the new 
policy persued, which advocates the 
buying of bus routes and having them 
act as feeders to the railways instead 
of competition. 

O 

To make a peach cordial: 

One dozen roses, a dinner at Chef's, 
one fur coat, one diamond bracelet 
one car — ! 

O 

In N ew York City College among 
the Frenchman class of 832, nine stu- 
dents are fourteen years of age and 
112 are in their fifteenth year. 



STUDENTS WILL AID 

INSTITUTION ABROAD 



(Continued from Page 1) 
tutors numbers nine. The school at 
present is under the supervision of a 
Lebanon Valley graduate. The ob- 
ject of the Academy is to train 
Christian leaders for the Church, the 
State, the professions and business. 
Its graduates are filling many prom- 
inent places already in these various 
lines of work; forty-one are teachers 
eleven are in government services; 
one is practicing law; another medi- 
cine; fifteen are engaged in business 
and three are preaching, while others 
are pursuing advanced studies in Eng- 
land or America. One of the Acade- 
my's graduates, Joe Rettew, is at 
present a student at this college. 

Every college ought to encourage 
and support such a project because 
the students need the wider outlook 
and the interest in world problems 
which support of this type will 
create. 

Both churchmen and statesmen ad- 
vance the belief' that in Africa the 
Christian school is the only hope ot 
the people. The many schools which 
are connected with African churches 
are giving the children all the secular 
education they will ever get in ad- 
dition to Christian training. Albert 
Academy is just ending its twenty- 
fourth year as, such a potent influ 
ence in Africa. 

The committee responsible for the 
drive are providing for personal con- 
tact with the students in raising the 
funds. Grace Keener and John Sny- 
der the Y. W. and Y. M. chairmen of 
the committee, are planning to make 
this drive on Thursday and Friday, 
March thirteenth and fourteenth, 
i'hey request the support of the stu- 
dents and faculty. 

O • 

BERMUDA'S CLIMATE 



The chniatic conditions in Bermuda 
are found to be most remarkable ac 
cording to an article recently appear- 
ing in Haverford News in which the 
following extract was printed from a 
lecture given by Rev. Earp, rector ot 
the Church of Redeemer in Bryn 
Mawr: "The climate of the island is 
remarkably equable, as it is sheltered 
by the Gulf stream so that there is 
never any frost in winter. The sum 
mers are warm and especially humid, 
and when the wind blows from a cer- 
tain quarter piano keys collapse and 
the humidity causes books and cloth- 
ing to mould. 

"The greatest problem of the in- 
habitants is that of obtaining water, 
as there are no wells or streams, and 
all the supply must be saved from tha 
rainfall. The government reuires the 
whitewashing of all the houses in or- 
der to purify the water which is stor- 
ed on the roofs, whole goldfish are 
often provided to destroy insects 
which may have bred in the water- 
tanks." 

O 

The person who writes some pop- 
ular song that will give "Sunny Side 
Up" a rest deserves a gold medal. 



CLOTHING F QUALITY 

J S BASEHORE 

Lebanon, Pa. 



ESBENSHADE'S BOOK STORE 

38 N. 8th St. -:- -:- Lebanon, Pa. 

We appreciate your patronage and invite you to make 
our store your shopping place, your resting place, your 
visiting place, and the place to meet your friends when 
in Lebanon. 

THE LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE STORE 
J. W. Esbenshade, L. V. '03 Edith S, Esbenshade, L. V. '03 
Ann Augusta Esbenshade, L. V. '32 



CAGEMEN SEIZE 

ALBRIGHT VICTORY 



(Continued from Pape 1) 

In the second half, Lebanon Vallev 
got going and soon had a lead of a 
few joints. However toward the 
c 1 ojse of the period both Heller and 
Albright were put out of the gam 
on fouls the'r pos : tions being take- 
by Ferns'er and Frey. The Rea&inp 
tern fought desperately to get tin 
points necessary for v'c'.ory while I 
V. fought "list as desperately to pro 
tect its slim lead. 

Albright pulled up to within on< 
point of our boys and just before the 
c'ose of tthe game, three Albr'gh' 
shots rol'ed around the rm of the' 
basket only to drop on the outside 
Both teams \ve~e fighting for the baT 
under Albright's basket as the whip 
Me blew, bringing joy to Lebaror 
Valley and disappointment to Al- 
bright. 

"Sweeney" Light played a nio r 
game especially in the second ha' 
when he troke up many plays for tlr 
opponents. Ha'nes and Karlin wen 
the leading threats for the Albrigh 
team. Both of these men were very 
dangerous on the offense. 

The game was a tough one for A 1 
bright to .lose, but it was sweet re- 
venge for the last minute defeat 0/ 
Lebanon Valley in the football gam- 
and for the defeat in basketball a I 
Reading earlier in the season. 



GOING DOWN! 

/ cco"d : ng to a camparison of sur- 
veys made in 1923 and in 1929 con- 
cerning the outstanding vices of co 1 - 
lege life, the etlvcs students of the 
University of Texas have discovered 
Miat in the 192^ census drinking rank 
- 1 fith huf in the more recent calcu- 
V.ffon ; t has dro'ped to ninth place 
The ranking of the sixteen most out- 
standing vices among college student 
appears thus: Sex irresu1arit ; p r 
cheating, stealing, lying, vulgar talk 
„.„ nr ; r ,pr_ pr-vnhljnfr. selfishness 
L-ink : r>g fro"s ; n Sabbath-breaking 
"xtravasranre snobbishness, idleness 
r mok'ng. and dancing. How woulr' 
L. V. rank? 



SOCIETY PINS 
Ranging in Price 
from 
$2.75 PLAIN 

to 

$12.00 CROWN SET 



GRIMMS 

COLLEGE BOOK STORE 



CHEFS 
HOUSE OF GOOD 

UAfln 



Penn Highway 
Near Annville 



M-als Served at All Hours 

BANQUETS AND PARTIES 
Our Specialty 



GLEEMEN ENTERTAIN 

AT PINE GROVE 



Last Thursday evening the Men's 
Glee Club motored to Pine Grove 
where they gave their second con- 
cert for this season. The people of 
Pine Grove were well pleased with'i 
the program which was rendered in 
the usual fashion. 

The club has more prospective 
trips on hand, but as yet has no defi- 
nite dates for any concerts. The Bus- 
iness Manager reports that it is ex- 
ceeding difficult to obtain concerts 
this year. It is hoped that this situ- 
ation will clear up in the near future, 
and that the enthusiastic reception 
usually given the Club will be extend- 
ed to them this season. 



PRINTINC 



3 



J. F BERLEW 
DEPARTMENT STORE 

Two Doors From Post Office 

Invites your inspection of 
General Merchandise 



HAVE YOU SEEN 
The Latest In Die-stamped stationery 
Your Whole Name Forms The 
Design 

COME IN AND SEE IT 

BOLLMANS 

.3.3 South Eighth Street, 
Lebanon, Pa. 



D. L SAYLOR & SON; 

Contractors 

LUMBER AND COAL 



ANNVILLE. PA. 



For 

QUALITY PLUS 



Material and Workmanship 
Repairs at Special Rates 
Go To 

ANNVILLE SHOEMAN 

207 W. Main 



M. H. SMITH 

JEWELER 

Watches at Lowest Prices 
Watch and Clock Repairing 
38 Railroad St. Annville, Pa. 



When you want work 
of the better kind see 

HIESTER— The Pri n t er 



H W MILLER 



Annvilh 



HARDWARE 
OF QUALITY 



Pa. 



PHOTOGRAPHS 

LIVE FOREVER 

Ulrich's Studio 

820 Cumberland St. 



PRINTING 

PUBLICATION. 
BOOKS, CATA 
LOGUES, STATION- 
ERY, CARDS, TAGS, 

ANNVILLE PRINTING 
COMPANY 

ANNVILLE PA. 




RUSSEL and SPANGLER 

Our Agents At 

LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 
FINKELSTEIN 
Cleaners & Dyers 



TRY OUR HOME MADE 
SANDWICHES 

QUALITY LUNCH 

BREYER'S ICE CREAM 
A Specialty 

7 E. Main St. Annville, Pa. 



For Quality 

Baked Products 

Patronize 

FINK'S BAKERY 

Main Street 



KREAMER BROS. 



STEINITE RADIOS 
EASY ELECTRIC WASHE R 

COLUMBIA GAS STOVES AND RANGES 
RUGS AND LINOLEUMS 

"House of Better Values" 
FURNITURE AND UNDERTAKING 

328 W. Main St. Phone 6R3 



Annville, Pa- 



THEPENNWAY 



OPPOSITE P. O. 



A FULL LINE OF FRESH PASTRY DAILY 



Y\ 
er, 
the 
«p f 
glov 
ter < 

Tl 
Use 
in en 
base 
ditic 
by t 
this 
f ron 
dent 
Wor 

Tl 
a h; 
cant 
year 
teart 
and 
Hon! 
anio 
the 
Port 
Clin 
Phy- 
Wz z 
Woe 
and 
T res 
■ Jacl< 
and 



L. CLUB THANKS 
yOU FOR YOUR 
SUPPORT 




LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



STILL TIME 
TO SIGN FOR 
A QUITTIE 



'OLUME VI 



ANNVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA, THURSDAY, MARCH 20, 1930 



No. 



ORATORS WIN 
SECOND CONTEST 



jUNIATA ..FALLS 
BEFORE REBUTTAL 
ATTACK 



On Thursday evening, March 13th, 
in Philo Hall, the negative debating 
team of Lebanon Valley College scored 
their second decisive victory by a de- 
cision of three to nothing against 
their opponents, the affirmative team 
of Juniata College. The question for 
debate was: Resolved, That the 
United States withdraw from the 
Kellogg Peace Pact. 

Each team presented its material in 
a most convincing manner. The af- 
firmative team had brought their own 
catalogued file of notes, and although 
they displayed much ability in refu- 
tation their main speeches were not 
quite as forcefully delivered as were 
those of the negative team. Never- 
theless, originality was quite evident 
in the rebuttal speeches where each 
speaker followed hard on the heels 
of the preceding speaker. This was 
the most enjoyable part of the whole 
debate. The affirmative speakers in 
their order tried to present convinc- 
ing arguments to prove that first the 
pact is weak and false; secondly, be- 
cause it is false, it is dangerous; and 

(Continued on Page 4) 

O 



BASEBALL MEN 

HOLD MEETING 



With the coming of spring weath- 
er > baseballs are again flying across 
the campus as the boys are warming 
U P for the coming season. Bats and 
gloves have been dragged out of win- 
! er storage and put to use again. 

The varsity has not yet begun prac- 
1Se although a meeting of baseball 
J le n was called a week ago. The 
lj aseball field must first be put in con- 
ation before active work can be done 
J those out for the team. The rain 
this week prevented the manager 
r °m fixing the d ; amond and inci- 

entally saved the freshmen from 
work. 

Tl 

ne men out for the team will have 
3 har d job to fill the shoes left va- 
^ nt by those who graduated last 
ear - The whole battery of last year's 
earr > is lost as well as the short stop 
i; a second basemen. The open posi- 
ns should develop real rivalry 
n g those who arc trying to make 
Po m ' ^' le following have re- 
nted at the first meeting: catchers, 
,• njak, Hughes, Clemens, and Mur- 
tr ! y; _ Pitchers, Gaciofano, Bovino, Pa- 
, , r z,0 >. Daub, Monteith, and George 
■ «u, first base, Dennis Bartolct, 

n( l T-T 1 1 

•p seller; second base, Stewart, 
1 rp-»:„ . 



tio 
atrio 



r ezi s , 
l ck s 

M K: 

p'^'t. Shortlidge, Binosky, and 
"ig. 
Th 

P D e " rst game is scheduled with 
' * M. 
April. 



la k and Wauprhtcl; short stop, 
:s - and Metzler; third base, Light 

-Waybill; and outfielders, Al- 
ight 



if A.. ^' awa y. on the twenty-third 



L. V. NOT ENROLLED IN 
ORATORICAL CONTEST 



In the list of 152 colleges and uni- 
versities from 39 different states 
which have already entered the 1930 
National lnter-collegiate Oratorica? 
Contest on the Constitution, as an- 
nounced this week by P. Caspar Har- 
vey, the director of the contest, the 
name of Lebanon Valley College does 
not yet appear. 

The entry list will close March 25 
and any entry which bears a post 
mark later than March 25 will not be 
admitted. 

The wide range of the interest in 
the 1930 contest is shown by the fact 
that inquiries have already been re- 
ceived from Yale, Harvard, Dart- 
mouth, and Cornell in the East, from 
the Universities of Florida, Alabama, 
and Texas in the South, from North- 
western and the University of Minne- 
sota in the North, and from Stanford 
and the University of Oregon in the 
West. 

Colleges and universities need no, 
choose their representatives until 
April 15. The regional and state con- 
tests will take place April 24 — May 3, 
the seven zone contests will take 
place May 16 — May 30, and the na- 
tional final contest at Los Angeles 
will be June i9, where the grand 
prizes will total $5000. Anyone vwu 
is interested should interview Prof. 
Stevenson at once, and arrangements 
for entry will be made. 

O 



MUSIC STUDENTS 
HOLD RECITAL 



FINE DISPLAY OF 
FIRS T-Y EAR 
TALENT 



The music department of L. V. 
again came to the lore when a Stu- 
dents' Recital was held in the Engle 
Conservatory last Thursday evening 
at eight oclock. An appreciative au- 
dience was present to hear the selec- 
tiotio which were rendered in piano- 
forte, organ and voice. 

The ability of the "younger gener- 
ations" of music students was very 
well demonstrated by Janet Favinger 
in a piano solo, "At Sunset" by 
Ewing. Eleanor Kissinger next gave 
two piano selections of Shubert— 
"Moment Musicale" and "Impromptu 
in A flat". Miss Kissinger brought 
out the wonderful flow of melody and 
simple expressiveness which are so 
characteristic of Schubert's composi- 
tions. Following Miss Kissinger's se- 
lections, Kathryn Lutz pleased the 
audience with two songs— "LilHes of 
Loraine" by Connor, and "Joy" by 
Cadman. Miss Lutz had a very pleas- 
ing stage manner and, along with her 
accompanist, Miss Gladys Wagner, 
proved that the freshmen arc deserv- 
ing of much credit. A piano solo, 
"Romance" by Sibelius, played by 
Dorothy Plaldeman, was the next 
number on the program. Miss Hakle- 
man, as usual, played with great 
depth of expression and variety of 
interpretation. Again the freshman 
(Continued on Pa*« 4) 



'yUITTlE' SALES 



Reports of the first week of the 
"Quittie" sales campaign are most 
encouraging. Not all of the students 
and faculty have as yet been inter- 
viewed, hut those that have been ap- 
proached have responded with a very 
cooperative spirit. 

Following is a tahulation of the 
campaign based on reports received 
before Tuesday morning. These are 
incomplete, but will serve as an indi- 
cation of the cooperation of the vari- 
ous classes. 

Juniors 100 % 

Sophomores .'. 38.4% 

Seniors 37-2% 

Freshmen 34.2% 

The campaign committee expects 
to more than double the percentages 
of the three classes by the time of 
their next report. Help them to 
realize their expectations! 

Y. I. SPONSERS 
ST. PATRICK'S PARTY 



CHARMING PROGRAM 
DELIGHTS L. V. 
COEDS 



The Y. W. C. A. charmingly en- 
tertained the girls of L. V. C. in a 
St. Patrick's Party, Tuesday after- 
noon, March 18, in North Hall Par- 
lor. 

The room was cleverly decorated 
in the appropriate green, with huge 
streamers hanging from the walls 
and the shamrock everywhere in evi- 
dence. The atmosphere of Ireland 
was there in all its greenness. 

Marian Kruger attired in a typical 
Irish gown, did the honors as an- 
nouncer and although the party was a 
St. Patrick's one, the program was, 
by no means, a "green" one. Mildred 
Myers as first entertainer, played 
one of her delightful piano solos 
which are always appreciated. Helen 
Franklin followed this with a tap 
dance done to the Irish lilt. This 
won much applause. In a clarinet 
solo, Helen Eddy displayed her abil- 
ity in a selection "Souvenirs." Hes- 
ter Thompson delighted the audience 
for a few minutes with a gay little 
song, "Spring." 

Carolyn Fisher closed the enter- 
tainment by reading some poems of 
Erin's Isle; some with the subtle 
humor found only in the works of 
Irish poets, others with the haunting, 
sad note describing the oppression of 
the "wearers of the green". 

Tea was then served. While the 
freshmen girls served delicious eat- 
ahles, Madame Green and Mrs. Wal- 
lace presided at the tea and choco- 
late. 

The party was well attended by 
the girls and each of the young la- 
dies voted it a huge success. 

Much credit' must be given to the 
refreshment and program committees 
for making it a "real" St. Patrick's 
Party. 



COLLEGE CALENDAR 

i 

Friday, March 21 — j 

Literary Soceties' Meetings, 2 

Philo-Delphian Joint Session. 

Sunday, March 23 — 

Y. M. & Y. W. Meetings. ' 

( 

Vednesday, March 26 — 
Debate at Juniata. 



NATIVE GALILEAN 
DELIVERS LECTURE 



TRAVELOG D E L IG H T S 
HOUSE CROWDED 
TO CAPACITY 



The Centuries of history wrapped 
up in the Holy Land were unfolded 
when Stephen A. Haboush, native 
Galilean, presented his travelog, 
"Jerusalem and the East" on Tues- 
day evening, March the eighteenth. 
The life and beauty of Palestine were 
depicted with artistically colored 
slides and moving pictures. 

Damascus, the oldest city in the 
world, was the first point visited by 
the audience on its vicarious journey. 
The first glimpse of Oriental life was 
observed here as natives were seen 
walking up and down the roofed 
streets. These streets the lecturer 
stated have been roofed to provide 
shelter for the shopkeepers from a 
scorching sun which raises the tem- 
perature to one hundred and ten de- 
grees. From Damascus the travel- 
lers journeyed on to Galilee with its 
azure sea and rugged hills. En route 
to the Dead Sea they passed through 
the historic town of Bethlehem. The 
Dead Sea Mr. Haboush explained is 
thirteen hundred feet below sea level 
and is fed by the melting snow of 
Mount Herman. Between eight and 
nine hundred tons of water are 
evaporated from its surface daily. 
Scientists claim that millions of dol- 
lars of chemicals are available from 
its bed. 

Like the Crusaders in the days of 
Richard the Lion Hearted the audi- 
ence ended their journey at Jerusalem 
where the ancient temple of Solomon 
once stood. The exquisite mosaics 
of the Mosque of El-A.ksa were 
shown vividly on the colored slides. 
The Mosque though now a place of 
worship for the Mohammedans is 
built upon the original site of Solo- 
mon's Temple. One wall of the orig- 
inal temple still remains as a memor- 
ial to the Old Testament writers and 
is historically known as the Wailing 
Wall. 

The travelog was promoted by the 
Varsity "L" Club. Due to the en- 
terprise of the Messrs. Orsino and 
Frivola the Club was able to fill the 
house to capacity. The lecturer, Mr. 
HaUoush, further acknowledged the 
splendid work of the two gentlemen 
in making the lecture a success when 
he called them to the platform and 
presented them with mother of pearl 
necklaces, souvenirs of the Holy 
Land. 



DEBATERS CONTINUE 
WINNING STREAK 



GENEVA AFFIRMATIVE 
THIRD VICTIM 
OF LOCALS 



Continuing their winning streak, 
the negative debating team of Leba- 
non Valley College emerged with a 
2-t victory Saturday evening, Marcl: 
15, in Philo Hall, over the debater? 
of Geneva College, Beaver Falls, 
Penna. The question debated was: 
Resolved: That the U. S. should with- 
draw from the Kellogg Peace Pact. 

The debate was well organized and 
convincing arguments were presented 
by both teams. The affirmative, up- 
held by Geneva, in favor of the with- 
drawal of the U. S. from the pact, 
argued from the falseness of the doc- 
ument, the un-American standpoint 
both in origin and in purpose and its 
hindrance of the U. S. in her efforts 
toward world peace. In turn the neg- 
ative team praised the pact as it is a 
great step toward international peace 
and that the moral tone of the treaty 
will instill a peace psychology in the 
minds of the people instead of a war 
psychology. 

Both teams did exceptionally good 
work and real debating was shown 
in the excellent rebuttals which fol- 
'owed the constructive speeches. The 
decision, however, was left for the 
judges to make and once more the 
Kellogg Pact advocates gained a vic- 
tory. 

The judges for the occasion were: 
Revs. Hinson and Swope of Lebanon, 
and Prof. C. A. Boyer of the Houck 
Junior High of Lebanon. 

Representing L. V. C. were Mar- 
tha Daley, Gerald Heilman, Russe! 
Etter and Helen Franklin. On the 
Geneva team were: Elinor Dunker- 
ley, Fanny Weislnan and Margaret 
Hum. 

O 

UNANIMOUS DECISION 

OVER SUSQUEHANNA 



For the second time of the season, 
L. V.'s negative debating team gain- 
ed a unanimous vicfjory, this time 
over Susquehanna College, on Mon- 
day evening, in Philo Hall, before a 
well represented faculty and student 
body. The question under debate was: 
"Resolved, That the U. S. should 
withdraw from the Kellog Peace 
Pact." 

While the arguments on both sides 
were well delivered it was in the re- 
buttal that one point after anoth^r 
was tossed back and forth with some 
very clever repartee. 

The judges were Miss Appel, of 
Annville, and Mir. Weirich, and Mr. 
Schaak of Lebanon. 

Those on the negative team were 
Misses Wihna Walker, Capt., Oar- 
inda Seller and Ida Schweitzer. 
Messrs. Lawrence Fisher and Walter 
Folkrod spoke in the rebuttal. 

The negative side was upheld bv 
Martha Daley, Helen Franklin, Ger- 
ald Heilman, and Russel Etter, Capt. 
Prof. Ritchie acted as chairman. 



PAGE TWO 



LA VIE COLLEG1 ENNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 20, 1930 



ESTABLISHED 1925 



A weekly publication by the Under- 
graduate Students of Lebanon 
Valley College 



EDITORIAL STAFF 

Russel Etter, '31 Editor-in-Chief 

Ruth Liller, '31 Associate Edito 

R. Roudabush, '31 .... Associate Editor 
R .Morgan, '31 .... Managing Editor 

EEPOBTOEIAL STAFF 

Robert Eshleman, '31 

Madeline Sheddy, '31 - 

Ruth Shroyer, '32 

Hilda Buckley, '32 

Walter Krumbeigel, '33 

General Reporters 

Mary Goshert, '32 Conservatory 

Robert Rawhouser, '32 Athletics 

Dorothy Garber, '32 .... Gionian 

Mary Epply, '32 Delphian 

Percy Clements, '33 Kalozetean 

Fred Mund, '32 Philokosmian 

Edna Early, '31 .... Alumni Reporter 

BUSINESS STAFF 

G. Becker, '31 .... Business Manager 

P. Keene, '32 Asst. Business Manage 

C. Wise, '31 .... Circulation Manage 



FACULTY ADVISORS 

Dr. Paul A. W. Wallace, English Dept, 
Miss Mary K. Wallace, English Dept 
Dr. Paul S. Wagner. Math. Dept 

LA VIE COLLEGIENNE. a membe: 
of the Intercollegiate Newspaper Asso- 
ciation of the Middle Atlantic States. 



Single Copies '. . 10 cents 

Subscription $1.50 per year 



Entered at the Annville, Pa., post- 
office as second class matter under the 
Act of March 3. 1879. 



NOISE 



A recent development in the ad- 
m.nistrations of our large cities is the 
appointment of commissions to stud> 
ti.e causes of noises common tt 
crowded areas and to suggest mean; 
of abolishing them. We wonder 1 
sucn a commission might not find w 
real job on hand at L. V. C? Wt 
suppose the noises common to tht 
dormitories, the administration build 
i; g, the dining-hall, the library and 
even the chapel are a part of the tra- 
d. Lions of the institution. But we cer- 
tainly require a great deal of enlight- 
ei.ment on the subject before we wu 
be convinced that they are necessary. 

The present state of the weather 
m.kes such annoyances especially dis 
tracting. Our powers of concentia 
tion are barely equal to the task of 
listening to even the most interestin 
lectures, and we feel confident that 
those who are responsible for theii 
delivery are none the less affected by 
the "balmy breezes of spring.'' Ba-t 
no sooner have we risen to the task 
than we sink in despair when some 
one's iron-shod heels beat time to 
the whistled tune of anything from 
"Yankee Doodle'' to "Sunny Side 
Up," while the owner nonchalantly 
makes his way down one of the hall.-, 
of the Ad' building. Gradually we 
regain our poise while the professo: 
mops his brow (figuratively speaking 
of course). But our repose is short 
lived. A chorus of fiendish howl: 
arises from the men's day-studeni 
room, and filters into every nook and 
cranny of the building, while the gym 
belches a volley of shrieks tha 
all the cohorts of the monarch of the 
nether regions could scarcely dupli 
cate. Phew! What a time! The 
Fates be merciful to the poor co-ed 
who has a condition to remove! 

Nor it the Ad. building the only 
place where noise reigns supreme 
Thank heaven this spring weathei 
removes some of the inveterate so- 
cializes from their favorite haunt 
the library. If some benefactor of 
mankind will invent suitable muz 
zles for the remainder, and a device 
for silencing the raucous chairs which 
some delight in scraping over the 
floor, all will be lovely. And if 
someone will suggest a means of 
eliminating immoderate crooners, ra 



dios, phonographs, shouters, etc., 
from the dorms, we know some stu- 
dents who will be willing to con- 
tribute somewhat toward erecting a 
monument to his or her memory. 

We do not wish to be misunder 
stood, however. We are for merri- 
ment, fun, pep, humor and all Un- 
rest of it. We are not pleading in 
behalf of the inveterate book-worm. 
AH we say is that there is a certain 
minimum of studying that must be 
done, and that cannot be done when 
the student is bombarded by a regu- 
lar bedlam. Let's give our lungs — 
and our heels, too — as much exercise 
as possible, but please let's respect 
the rights of others. 



KEEPING ABREAST 

One of the clasical criticisms of 
the college student is his lack of 
knowledge of the affairs of the world. 
He lives in an atmosphere of books 
and professors, lectures and labora- 
tories, formulae and historical char- 
acters. He knows a great deal about 
Plato, Homer, Euclid, Newton, Mil- 
coir, Faraday and jolm Stiar t Mill, 
out of the men who direct the great 
tides of contemporary affairs his 
knowledge is vague to say the least. 
He can interpret the events of the 
past, but the trends of the present 
are a sealed book to him. 

Just how far this criticism is justi- 
fied is an open question. The degree 
of this type of pedantry prevalent 
among students differs between in- 
titutions and individuals. But cer- 
tain it is that many are hopelessly 
gnorant of current happenings, even 
in the field which they may have 
chosen as their major. And that 
this situation is deplorable can scarce- 
y be denied. We are not attempting 
o belittle in any respect the acquisi- 
tion of information which does not 
ind cannot have any immediate and 
direct pratical application. Knowledge, 
like virtue, is its own reward. But 
<ncwiedge is always enhanced by 
being put to use. 

After all, even college students 
must sooner or latter take their place 
n the practical, work-a-day world. 
To be unprepared for facing its prob 
ems is the worst sort of ignorance. 
No one can lay claim to being edu 
;ated who posesses no grip on the af- 
fairs of the world. Dreams are splen- 
lid, ideals are fine, but he would suc- 
ceed must be able to fit his dreams 
and ideals into the practical matters 
of life. 

We will do well to begin at once 
cultivating this outlook. Lectures 
magazine:-, newspapers, current books 
—we cannot offord to neglect these 
entirely, even for Shakespeare or 
Dante. We may revel in the past 
if we choose, but let's keep abreast 
of the times. 

READERS' CLUE 

PLANS TRIP 



Owing to the illness of Dr. Wal- 
lace, the Readers Club held their 
meeting in North Hall Palor on 
Wednesday evening. 

Edward Shellenberger gave an in- 
teresting report on Emil Ludwig's 
Napoleon and on the works of Lud- 
vig. This was followed by a general 
d : scussion. 

On Saturday, April 26th, members 
of the Reader's Club will motor to 
Philadelphia to see the presentation 
of "Elizabeth and Essex". All other? 
who are interested are cordially in- 
cited to accompany the Club and are 
requested to hand their names to 
Dorothy Hyhind or Helen Hain. 



A frog with a couple of extra legs 
threatens to make necessary the re- 
vision of school textbooks on physi 
ology. 

Instead of telegraphing specific or 
ders to particular muscles by means 
pi a network of nerves, Dr. Weiss, 
Berlin, says the central nervous sys 



MOZART FESTIVAL 

AT HARRISBURG 



Students of music in central Penn- 
sylvania win again be presented with 
Hie opportunity 01 hearing most un- 
usual and important mus.c by the 
third annual Harrisuurg lUozart 
restival winch will be hem in the city 
uviay 6, 9, and 10. Many travel miles 
10 near simiiiar music, but in May, 
through the festival, a series of hve 
remarkable programs will virtually be 
placed on tnc door steps ot the 
Mate's colleges. 

This year the festival programs will 
employ tliree large choruses, the 
aduit festival Chorus of 200 voices, 
a children's chorus of 500 voices and 
another of 200 voices; a full sym- 
phony orchestra and soloists of note 
111 the music world. Few towns in 
the country can boast of such an as- 
semblage of talent. 

The soloists this year are Paul Alt- 
house, for years leading tenor with 
the Metropolitan Opera Company; 
Alice Mock, soprano with the Chi- 
cago Civic Opera Company; Ethel 
fox, soprano, a member of the San 
Carlo Opera Company, and Frederic 
Baer, concert soloist of national re- 
known because of his wonderful bar- 
itone voice. The orchestra will be 
that organization headed by the fam- 
ous George Barrere. 

The opening concert of the three 
day fstival will be held Thursday 
evening, May 8, when Mozart's Grand 
Mass in C Minor will be presented 
by the Festival Chorus, orchestra and 
soloists. This mass is sung in its en- 
tirety no other place in the world. It 
has been given two times before in 
Harris burg- under the direction of 
ward-Stephens who is the conductor 
of the festival. 

Friday afternoon, May 9, will be 
marked by an unusual performance. 
This program will consist of the 
singing of Pierne's "The Children of 
Bethlehem" with a children's chorus 
of 500 voices and soloists. The size 
of the chorus marks this program as 
one of the most unusual presentations 
of the festival season. An orchestral 
concert will be held Friday evening 
with vocal and instrumental solo 
numbers in addition. 

Saturday afternoon's program on 
May 10, will be artist's recital with 
solo numbers, vocal and instrumen- 
tal, as well as music by the famous 
Barrere Little Symphony. 
, The performance on Saturday 
evening will mark the close of the 
festival season here. It will be a fit- 
ting close with two choruses singing 
Pierne's "St. Francis of Assisi". The 
work will require the use of the Fes- 
ival Chorus, the children's chorus of 
200 voices, the full symphony orches- 
tra and the soloists. 

In all these programs, Ward-Ste- 
phens will be the conductor with 
George Barrere guest conductor dur- 
ing the artists' recital. Prof. William 
C. Harclerode, supervisor of music in 
the Harrisburg schools, will have 
charge of the children's choruses and 
will direct Friday evening's program. 

This announcement will be of 
special interest to the students of Lei) 
anon Valley Conservatory, many of 
whom will doubtless avail themselves 
of the opportunity of hearing this 
splendid assemblage of talent. 




LEAH ANNA MILLER 



tern really broadcasts to all muscles 
simultaneously. 

It was the extra legs which were 
grafted onto the frog that led Dr. 
Weiss to this theory. The nerves of 
the extra legs were hooked onto the 
nervous system without any attempt 
to connect with "the night wire." They 
merely made contact with nerve sub- 
stance. The extra legs responded to 
the same impulses as the original 
legs. 



Nods and becks and wreathed smiles, 
Such as hang on Hebe's cheek, 
And love to live in dimple sleek; 

Leah herself, the little songster 
/from Germansville near Allentown, 
Penna.! Leah is one of the few mor- 
tals who can give the birds opposi- 
tion when it comes to warbling, as 
all those who have heard her will 
surely agree. With music there is 
usually mirth and how often have you 
seen Leah frown? Not often, for she 
is a bundle of sunshine, sparkling, 
bubbling and extremely contagious. 
She resides in West Hall, and though 
being the Hall president and Vice 
President of the "Jigger Board" her 
smile still remains unaffected. 

Leah is busily engaged spending 
her time between the Conservatory 
and the 'Ad' building and we hear 
that she punishers the books to some 
extent. But this does not detain her 
from seeing "that boy" down at the 
'Jeff Medical School occasionally. 
Yes, she joined the cohorts of Terp- 
sichore. 

Leah too, as many others is going 
to become a school 'marm' and is go- 
ing to expound and propound His- 
tory to the High Schoolers, lucky 
dogs! But cheer up, Leah. We have 
a hunch there are better prospects 
ahead. 

O 



FACULTY DROPS 

MATCH TO RIFLEMEN 

Last Friday evening a few of the 
members of the Rifle Club shot a 
match with the members of the Fac- 
ulty who responded to the challenge 
issued by the club in chapel. The 
meet was a good one and all were 
very much interested in the shoot 
and its outcome. The students won 
by a score of 593 to 531. 

The following are the individual 
scores: 

PROFS 

Gingrich 163 

Light 140 

Stokes 122 

Richie 106 

531 

STUDENTS 

C. Keene 188 

Roudabush 163 

W. Barnes 124 

Kazlusky 118 

593 

The match was enjoyed by both 
sides and a return match may be 
scheduled. 

O 



Eyes of glass, 

Teeth of clay — 
Peroxide blonde — 

She's phoney that way. 



CLARENCE PAUL BARNHARDT 



This is "Barney", folks, or with 
|more decorum Clarence Paul Barn- 
hardt, a gentleman from Hagerstown 
Md. Of course you want to know 
more about him so proceed slowly 
and beware of low bridge. 

It is said he never smokes and 
never employs any cuss-words; that' 

he has his sot ways He has a 

high scholastic standing He 

plays basketball for his class and at 
present he is its Treasurer. Also he 
is the president of the Philokosmian 

Literary Society He prefers 

girls to boys especially the girls from 

New Jersey He wears his 

roommate's ties but still remains well 

dressed He wears size 8 shoes 

and size 7 hat He attends the 

fire at West Hall but has no other 

interest there His hair is 

thinning on the top and tonics abso- 
lutely refuse to alleviate the situa- 
tion He likes to dance, play 

bridge, read Ranch Romances, attend 
motion pictures and work on an ice- 
wagon in the Summer time. 

Wal, thar's th' dirt. But wait a 
minute. We had almost forgotten that 
he is majoring in mathematics and 
has chosen teaching as his life-work. 

Y. W. NOTES 



"Spring" was the key-note to an 
interesting discussion at the "Friend- 
ly Hour", on Sunday evening, March 
,16. The meeting was in charge of 
the Sophomores, with Mary K. Gosn- 
ert as leader. The Scripture lesson 
was read by Naomi Shively, and was 
followed with prayer by the leader. 
A few choice selections from Words- 
worth and Shelley, centering on the 
theme, were read by Ruth Shroyer. 
After this, an appropriate reading 
was given by Ruth Armacast, point- 
ing out the effect of flowers on human 
life. A vocal duet, "Beautiful Isle ° f 
Somewhere", was then rendered 
Mary Buffington and Marie GelwickS 
in a very impressive manner, 
final number on the program, was 
beautiful interpretation of Spring P r _ e 
sented by Elizabeth Le Fevre, ^ 
which the awakening of nature 
applied to the lives of men and 
men. The meeting closed with 
mizpah benediction. 



-o- 



atio"' 



Thirty-five years ago the late 
Henry Chapman Mercer, intern 
ally known ethnologist who died r 

beau 11 ' 
did od' 1 
his 



cently, was attracted by the 
ful handwriting of a boy who 
jobs for him. He made the boy 
secretary. 

. the 11 

That boy, Frank King Swan a, f 
14, is now the owner of Dr. Me 
famous Moravian Pottery an qqO 
Works and the recipient of a -P 
legacy! 



h 

1- 

», 
w 

ly 

id 
at' 
a 
le 
at 
be 
in 
rs 
m 

lis 

dl 
es 
lie 
er 
is 
P- 
la- 
ay 
nd 



a 
iat 
nd 
rk. 



an 
id- 
•ch 

of 
sii- 
ion 
vas 
ten 
ds- 
tbe 
rer. 
•ng 
nt- 
iafl 

of 

by 
:k-5> 

A 
s a 
>re- 

in 
tvas 
w'O- 
the 




LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 20, 1930 



PAGE THREE 



"A COLLEGE JOKE TO CURE THE 'BLUES' " 

— Jonathan Swift. 



Evancoe — Your girl uses plenty of make-up. 
Lebo — Yeah, she's my powdered sugar. 

—LVC— 

Rearick — Why, do you want a monopoly on the business? 
Barney — Don't be a fool! 

— LVC— 
Snyder— I can make a stab at it. 
Myers — Can you spell homicide? 

-LVC— 
Clem — Naw, I read pretty good. 
Ruth — Do you read Poe? 

— LVC— 

Wolf — Did you ever see a real necking party? 
Wolf — ■Well, take a good look at me. 
M. E. S. — Of course not. 

— LVC— 

The small dining room is due for a treat. Barney has borrowed a 'Col- 
lege Humor.' 

— LVC— 

Charley — How does Becky like your new moustache? 
Skee — Darn it! I forgot to show it to her. 

— LVC — 

Dot Hyland— Has Shellenberger travelled much? 
Babe Early— Has he? Why he's been to half the places on his suitcase 
labels. 

—LVC— 

Zech — One man dies every minute in New York 
Goodman — Yeah, I'd like to see him. 

—LVC— 

Krumbiegel— Why are you wearing that old sweater to class? Haven't 
you any shirt? 

Spegg— Sure, I have lots of shirts, but they're both in the wash 

— LVC— 

Prof. Crawford— Why don't you practice what you screech? 

—LVC— 

Moose — I'd like a nice greeting card. 
Clerk — Something — er — Adolescent ? 

—LVC— 

Skee— He's a member of Phi Beta Kappa. 
Murphy— What Athletic club is that? 

— LVC— 

Suspicion is that feeling that creeps over a man who enters a Chop Suey 
joint and sees a waiter eating a ham sandwich. 

— LVC— 
Paul Keene — What's an iceberg? 
Rawhouser — A permanent wave. 

—LVC— 

Incidentally, did you hear about the twenty-seven Scotchmen who wer 
ln jured when two taxicabs collided? 

—LVC— i 
Alex — May I hold your hand? 
Pearl— What do you think this is, Talm Sunday? 

-LVC— 

Young man, did you study diligently at school? 
Burtner— There isn't any such course. 

— LVC— 

'Your're crazy', said the mattress to the quilt. 

— LVC— 

RELIEVE IT OR NOT— 

Salada goes to Lebanon Sunday night just for the ride. 
The 

rising generation retires about the time 



Kalo's program last Friday even- 
§■ was made up of a group of All- 
Star numbers. Variety was again fea- 
ured and members were furnished 
with both entertaining and beneficial 
elections. 
Harry Zechman, acting chaplain, 
had the devotions. Clarence "Babe'' 
Earley, the society's stand by, once 
more displayed his musical ability by 
inging "If You Were the Only Girl 
n the World." The number in it- 
elf is good but the "Babe's" person- 
lity made it all the more entertain- 
ng. Alexander "Ike" Grant then 
gave a very vivid account of his 
thirty-two hundred •mile hop. He car- 
ed his listeners right along with him 
y the use of clever description. 
Leaving Washington a few days be- 
fore Christmas Mr. Grant started 
south with Florida as his goal. He 
hose the coastal highway due to its 
famed beauty and found "hopping" 
exceptionally good. Within two 
weeks he was again in Washington, 
having made a thorough tour of the 
Sunshine" state and other Southern 
points of interest. Having encoun- 
tered many interesting; experiences, 
Tke" was able to furnish the society 
with a delightful report. The remain- 
der of the program was given over to 
'Star Dust" and each individual was 
given a chance to pull their latest 
and best story. This proved very in- 
teresting in that several new "Scotch" 
stories were rendered. 

O 

DELTA LAMBDA SIGMA 



the retiring generation 



r ises. 



'Billy' Coleman's real name is Agnes. 

The latest thing in foresight is the bootlegger who wraps 
Wlt h instructions on how to learn the Braille system. 
Kuhnert missed breakfast last Sunday. 
A waffle is a pancake with a non-skid tread. 
Burtner sips his ice-cream. 

Alex Myers was seen holding Dusty Rhodes' hand over the w eek-en< 
Taylor i s S o flatfooted that he could wax floors with his feet and n 



his bottle 



eek-end. 

ever 



rniss 



a spot. 



Hester Thompson thinks a postage stamp is a dance. 
Brisbane writes only for Art's sake. 



Well, letter! 



KAPPA LAMBDA SIGMA 



ducing one of the most thrilling plays 
of recent times. It promises to be 
'medley of mystery, farce, and in- 
trigue. Dr. Paul A. W. Wallace, who 
has coached Philo's plays for the 
past few years with much suc- 
cess, will coacli the play. Try- 
outs for the parts have been held 
during the past week, and the results 
will be made public within a shorn 
time. John W. Snyder, chairman oi 
the Anniversary committee, reports 
that .the program for the anni- 
versary has been fully planned. 
O 

KAPPA LAMBDA NU 



Clio's program on Friday night was 
begun with the devotions, led by 
Olive Morrow. "Hats" was the title 
of an interetsing pianologue, rendered 
by Lucile Engle. An amusing skit, 
"The Olive Branch," was cleverly 
presented by Eulalie Morton and 
Martha Daley. The last feature of 
(he program was a piano solo, very 
capably rendered by Mildred Myers. 
O 



L Y- 15 YE ARS AGO j 



STUDENT MISSIONARIES 

MEET AT STATE COLLEGE 



A worthwhile meeting was held by 
Delphian Literary Society on Friday 
evening, March 14. Devotions, con- 
ducted by the chaplain of the society, 
centered upon John 14:6 — "I am the 
Way, the Truth and the Life." 

Alma Clark opened the program by 
singing "Under a Blue Moon". Hen- 
rietta Wagner then presented a bio- 
graphical sketch of William Howard 
Taft, which proved to be quite i 
structive to all. Following this, Ruth 
Agen spoke on "Why St. Patrick's 
Day?", a fitting subject for the sea- 
son. Elizabeth Le Fevre read a poem 
"In the Sleeping Car", which was 
greatly appreciated by her audience 
Trula Koch brought the program to 
a close by a presentation of Irish 
jokes the wit and humor of which 
delighted her listeners and reminded 
them of "Old Ireland" and the Saint 
whose birthday is celebrated annually 

O ■ 

PHI LAMBDA SIGMA 



The regular Philo literary session 
was held on Friday evening, Marc! 
14. The meeting was short but well 
planned and ably presented. 

The devotional service was con- 
ducted by Farl E. Wolf, acting as 
chaplain. Robert Eshleman then 
played a few popular numbers on the 
piano. These were rendered with 
manifest accomplishment and skill 
thoroughly delighting the audience 
Paul Evancoe then gave a speech en 
titled, "A typical American". In this 
speech he traced the career of the 
late Howard W. Taft, and showed 
how he met the qualifications of 
true American by living a life of serv- 
ice to his country. The next num 
ebr was an impromptu speech by 
Clinton Allen. He spoke very briefly 
on the topic, "Campusology". Afte 
emphatically denying any first hand 
knowledge of the subject, he told o" 
those who are better endowed and 
equipped to speak on such a subject 
than he. After the usual spicy sug- 
gestions for the good of the order 
the meeting was adjourned. The play 
"Seven Keys to Baldpate", by George 
M. Cohan has been chosen by Philo 
for production at her sixty-third an 
niversary, Friday, May 2, 1930. Thi 
play is a melodramatic farce in three 
acts. In it the author has shown hi 
ingenuity and resourcefulness by pro 



One spring day in 1916 the girls 
of South Hall celebrated the fine 
weather by having a "clean-up day". 
The lawn about the dormitory had 
been littered very much with paper, 
orange peels, etc., and was a source 01 
much worry to the girls. So under 
the leadership of Miss Esta Ware- 
heim '16 all the girls gathered on the 
lawn at eight A. M. The work pro- 
gressed rapidly, the girls having 
been encouraged by the passers-by, 
and stimulated from time to time by 
cafe noir served by Mrs. Hallman, 
our "Shorty" Halhnan's mother, for 
they lived in South Hall. By 10:30 
the cleaning of the lawn was finished. 

The girls during the remainder of 
the year felt well repaid for their la- 
bor by the many compliments which 
they received. 

Would that this sort of inspiration 
would come to us more frequently! 

O • 

OPEN HOUSE 



In 1919 the Student Volunteer Vol- 
unteer Band of L. V. C. sent three 
delegates to the Fourteenth Annua 
Missionary Conference of Eastern 
Pennsylvania and New Jersey which 
convened at Pennslvania State Col- 
ege, in February of that year. 

The object of the conference was to 
show the great need for volunteers 
who will carry the gospel in harmony 
with the watchward of the organiza- 
tion, "The Evangelization of the 
World in This Generation." 

Messages were delivered by great 
men such as Robert Wilder, then re- 
igious secretary of the internationa 
committee of the Y. M. C. A.; Dr. 
John Gowdy, at that time President 
of tthe Anglo-Chinese College, Foo- 
chow, China; Dr. S. M. Zwerner, from 
Egypt, and various others. 




In 1916, according to the custom 
the girls' dormitories held their an- 
nual open house. The rooms were 
very neatly arranged and cleaned as, 
of course, the girls "dorms" always 
are (?) 

However, the strange part of this 
open house was that the girls enter- 
tained their visitors in the gymnasium 
in the evening. A little program was 
presented and, of course, there were 
refreshments. 

O 



On Saturday afternoon, March 21, 
1919, the Y. W. C. A. of the college 
gave an informal reception in North 
Hall parlor, to the Junior and Senior 
girls of Annville High School. The 
chairman, Miss Ruth Haines, '19, had 
arranged an interesting program and 
in a tactful way presented the object 
of organization a Friendship Club for 
the high school girls under the su- 
pervision and guidance of the Y. W. 
The purpose of the club was to cre- 
ate, maintain and extend throughout 
the schools a strong high moral sen- 
timent. The guests showed great en- 
thusiasm for forming a club and were 
wished the best of success. 



PARKER FOUNTAIN PENS 

GUARANTEED FOR LIFE 
Two Pens in One— A Desk Pen and a Pocket Pen. 
Ask To See Them. 

ESBENSHADE'S BOOK STORE 

38 N. 8th St. -:- -:- -:-: Lebanon, Pa. 



CLOTHING OF QUALITY 

J S BASEHORE 

Lebanon, Pa. 



E. J. SNAVELY AND COMPANY 

UMBRELLAS, LUGGAGE and SPORTING GOODS 
ATHLETIC EQUIPMENT 
628 Cumberland St. 
LEBANON, PENNA. 



Shaeffer's Lifetime Pens- 

NONE BETTER ABSOLUTELY GUARANTEED 

AN EVERYDAY NECESSITY FOR 
COLLEGE STUDENTS 

T The Gift Store of Lebanon 

H ARPEL/ O 757-759 Cumberland Street 



PAGE FOUR 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 20, 1930 



(Continued from Page 1) 

MUSIC STUDENTS 

HOLD RECITAL 



talent was evident when Theodore 
Walker delighted his listeners with a 
very beautiful and descriptive organ 
solo, "Dawn," by Jenkins. Following 
Mr. Walker's organ number, Olive 
Weigel displayed a variety of tech- 
nique and rhythmical quality in two 
piano selections, "The Eagle" by 
MacDowell, and "Juba Dance", by 
Dett. Another newcomer, Mr. Har- 
vey Horn, proved his ability as .a 
tenor of quality when he sang "1 
Look Into Your Garden" and "A 
Brown Bird Singing" by H. Wood, 
and "Ishtar" by Spross. His lasi 
number satisfied the desire for "some 
thing different" in song. Theodore 
Walker proved an able accompanist 
for Mr. Horn. A piano solo "Papil 
Ions" by Schumann was then playec 
by Mary K. Goshert. This numbei 
illustrated the striking rhythm am. 
harmonic efforts that are apparent 
in most of Schumann's works. Mis. 
Kissinger brought the program to ai. 
end with a very interesting and skil ■ 
fully played organ solo "Toccata ii 
G" by Dubois. 

COMMERCE CLUB 

AGAIN ENTERTAIN: 



On Monday evening the Commerc. 
Club held its weekly meeting in tlu 
small dining hall. The meeting too. 
the form of the usual supper and af- 
ter dinner speeches. 

Homer Allwein, the president, mad-, 
a few remarks concerning the im 
portance of a college education to th. 
business man of today. After Mr 
Allwein's remarks Mr. Gibble, o 
Harrisburg, gave an address on the 
subject "Business Problems of To 
day." His remarks were directed U 
the problems which every business 
man meets when he approaches othei 
men in and out of his own field. Mr. 
dibble's talk enlightened many 01 
the students, who were present, as tc 
the chief problems they had to mee,; 
in the world and gave some very val 
uable advice as to how to meet thelit 
successfully. 

The meeting was then adjourned 
Plans are now being laid for othe 
meetings to be held in the near fu- 
ture of this nature. 

O 

1930 CENSUS 



One of the most important of th< 
present year's public undertaking: 
will be the compiling of the fifteen! i 
decennial census of the United States 
to begin within the next few months. 

This census will furnish an im 
mense amount of information to those 
who make use of statistics. It will 
supply facts about the people, their 
births and deaths, and their occupa- 
tions. It will also reveal exhaustive 
data upon agriculture, manufacturers 
and other matters of economic impor 
tance. 

It is estimated that 100,000 person; 
will be employed, a large percentage 
of which will be women this year 
Ten years ago there were 87,000 per 
sons employed to compile these facts 

O 

ALBERT ACADEMY 

DRIVE CONTINUES 



The "Lebanon Valley in Africa'' 
drive which has been in progress this 
week has received the support of the 
student body. Miss Grace Keener and 
Mr. John Snyder as chairmen of the 
drive, have organized a committee to 
canvass the student body. These 
soicitors have been working among 
the students for several days. It will 
be some time however before the to- 
tal amount collected for Albert 
Academy will be known. 



SOPHS TAKE FIRST 

TITLE-SERIES GAME 

The Sophs defeated the Seniors 
36-16 in the first game of the title 
series Thursday night. They earned 
their place in the three-way tie last 
week by defeating the Seniors 39-18 
In arranging the play-off the Juniors 
drew a bye thus making the second 
Soph-Senior game necessary. 

Barnhart started the scoring for 
the evening by sinking a nice long 
shot from the middle of the court. 
His teammates Fink and Keene cam-, 
through with two "buckets" in rapid 
fire order thus giving the last year 
men a six point lead before the Soi-h: 
could get started. Ray Pickle, the 
Soph's bid for high scoring honor- 
isank two field goals and two fouls tc 
knot the count and start the second 
/ear men on their scoring rampage. 
The Sophs once more displayed tht 
ine system of passwork that has kep ( . 
them in the running. They ran up 
a safe lead and made numerous sub- 
stitutions but still the Seniors could 
do nothing but make futile attempts 
o overcome the wide margin. Letham 
was high scorer for the Sophs with 
nine points and Keene for the Sen 
ors with six. 

The final game will be played 
Thursday night between the Sophs 
and Juniors with the league title a 
;take. A good game is predicted be- 
cause the Sophs are out to avenge a 
ne point defeat handed tbem by the 
"uniors earlier in the season. 
SENIORS 

G. F. Pts. 

Snyder, rf 102 

Sitlinger, If 022 

Keene, c 306 

"ink, rg 102 

larnhart, lg 124 

Myers, lg 00c 

Burtner, lg 00c 

6 4 16 

SOPHS 

G. F. Pts. 

Shortledge, rf 11; 

k,o+h?m rf 410 

Pickle. If 3 1 7 

Hughes, If 2 o .' 

"aleh. c 20/ 

Kohler, c o o c 

McCusker, rg o o ( 

Lecthaler, lg 3 2 V 

Kinney, rg o 1 

IS 6 * 

O 

PRISON LISTS GROW 



New York's four state prisons- 
Sing Sing, Auburn, Clinton, and 
Great Meadow — have a population o' 
more than 6,300. In these same insti 
tution ten years ago there were 
less than j.ooo. While this revea 1 
to some extent evidence of a crim 
wave, the main reason for the in- 
crease is the fact that the' sentence 
now imposed are longer. 

O 

(Continued from Page 1) 

ORATORS WIN 

SECOND CONTEST 

thirdly, it is not a forward step to- 
ward disarmament. The negative ad- 
vanced their proofs by showing firs' 
'hat to withdraw from the pace would 
put the United States in a question- 
able position; secondly, to remain ii 
the pact enlists the good-will of th-* 
nations in support of peace; and 
diirdly, it offers an opportunity to 
ioin the family of nations. 

Dr. Butterwick presided as chair 
man of the debate and introduced the 
udges who were: Mr. Atkins, attor- 
ley-at-law, Lebanon; Professor A. M 
Hinkle, Principal of the Junior-Sen- 
or High School, Hershey; and Mr. 
Forensy, Lebanon. 

The affirmative team consisted of 
Vllene Yarnall, Carolina Pearce, and 
Florence Hess, with Ruth Ake acting 
is alternate. The rebuttal speech was 
delivered by Miss Ake in Miss Yar- 
nall's place. 



The members of the negative team 
were Martha Daley, Gerald Heilman, 
and Russell Etter, with Helen Frank- 
lin, alternate, who delivered the re- 
buttal speech in place of Miss Daley. 

A commendable turnout of stu- 
dents was present. The team ex- 
tends its thanks for the fine coopera- 
tion, and trust sthat it will be con- 
tinued throughout the season. 



M. H. SMITH 

JEWELER 

•Watches at Lowest Prices 
Watch and Clock Repairing 
38 Railroad St. Annville, Pa, 



! THE PENNWAY I 
I BARBER SHOP | 



N. M. RAUSCH, Prop. 
Annville, Pa. 



-IOFFMAN STEAM PRESS- 
ING 

KEYSTONE HAT CLEANING 

STEYE WORMS 



L0 W. Main St 



Annville, P*. 



Fine assortment of Watches, Rings, 

Chains, & etc. 
New Century Chiming Grandfather 
Clocks 

LIGHT'S JEWELRY STORE 
51 West Main St. 



j PIANOS 

i 
i 



PLAYER PIANOS 



PLAYER ROLLS I 



VICTOR RADIOS 

VICTROLAS 



VICTOR RECORDS j 

i 



SHEET MUSIC 



I Miller Music Store 

S 738 Cumberland Street 

'3 Lebanon, Pa. 



RUSSEL and SPANGLER 

Our Agents At 
LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 
FINKELSTEIN 
Cleaners & Dyers 



PHOTOGRAPHS 

LIVE FOREVER 

Ulrieh's Studio 

820 Cumberland St. 



PRINTING 




PUBLICATION. 
BOOKS, CATA 
LOGUES, STATION- 
ERY, CARDS, TAGS, 
ETC. 

ANNVILLE PRINTING 
COMPANY 

ANNVILLE PA, 



H W MILLER 



HARDWARE 
OF QUALITY 



Annville 



Pa. 



PRINTING 

When you want work 
of the better kind see 

HIESTER— The Printer 



J, P BERLEW 

DEPARTMENT STORE 

Two Doors From Post Office 

Invites your inspection of 
General Merchandise 



ARTISTS SUPPLIES 

Canvas, Parchment, Japanese Tissue, 
Fabriano White and Grey Charcoal 
Papers, Whatman's Hot and Cold- 
pressed Papers, Oil, Water and 
Decora Colors, Brushes, Atomizers, 
China Palettes, Drawing Boards, Col- 
ored Crayons and Pencils. 

All high grade materials 

BOLLMANS 

33 South Eighth Street, 
Lebanon, Pa. 



TRY OUR HOME MADE 
SANDWICHES 

QUALITY LUNCH 

BREYER'S ICE CREAM 
A Specialty 

7 E. Main St. Annville, P a . 



For Quality 

Baked Products 

Patronize 

FINK'S BAKERY 

Main Street 



SOCIETY PINS 
Ranging in Price 
from 
$2.75 PLAIN 
to 

$12.00 CROWN SET 



COLLEGE BOOK STORE 



D. L SAYLOR & SON 

Contractors 

LUMBER AND COAL 



ANNVILLE. PA. 




For 

QUALITY PLUS 

in 

Material and Workmanship 
Repairs at Special Rates 
Go To 



ANNVILLE SHOEMAN j 
207 W. Main 



HOUSE OF GOOD 

PnATV 



Wm. Penn Highway 



Near Annville 



Meals Served at AH Hours 
BANQUETS AND PARTIES 
Our Specialty 



KREAMER ROS. 



STEINITE RADIOS 
EASY ELECTRIC WASHER 
COLUMBIA GAS STOVES AND RANGES 
RUGS AND LINOLEUMS 

"House of Better Values" 
FURNITURE AND UNDERTAKING 

328 W. Main St. Phone 6R3 



Annville, Pa. 




PLACE YOUR EASTER ORDER NOW FOR 
WHITMAN'S CHOCOLATES 

THE PENNWAY 

OPPOSITE P. O. 
A FULL LINE OF FRESH PASTRY DAILY 



LAST CALL 
FOR 1931 QUITTIE 
SUBSCRIPTIONS 



"Mie €olk$ientte 

LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



CONGRATULATIONS 
TO THE SOPH 
TOSSERS 



VOLUME VI 



ANNVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA, THURSDAY, MARCH 27, 1930 



Xo. 4 



JUNIORS LOSE 

IN CAGE TILT 



LIFE WORK 

RECRUITS MEET 



SOPHOMORES SNATCH 
INTER-CLASS 
CHAMPIONSHIP 

Fighting desperately, a determined 
Sophomore basketball team defeated 
their former victors, the Juniors, to 
clinch the championship of the col- 
lege. With this victory they wiped 
out their only defeat of the season. 
The final score was Sophomores 28, 
Juniors 21. 

The Sophs were the first to break 
the ice, with a bucket from the field 
and a foul shot, but this little lead 
was soon equaled by the Juniors. It 
was nip and tuck all through the first 
half with the score, when the whistle 
blew, 12 all. 

The second half started more cau- 
tiously, but when the Juniors man- 
aged to squeeze out a little lead the 
Sophomores again came in fighting. 
At this moment, Lechthaler guard of 
the second year crew, who had con- 
tributed three field goals, was put out 
on personals. Leathern, who re- 
placed him, however, proved his met- 
tle and also sank three buckets from 
the field. 

The only menace of the Sophomores 
was Wood, who played guard for th 
Juniors. He was extremely devas- 
tating in getting the ball off the 
backboard and starting a Junior of 
fensive. Wood also led the high 
(Continued on Page 3) 



On Thursday evening, March 20, 
the Life Work Recruits of L. V. C. 
met for their regular meeting at the 
home of Dr. Jones, who read a por- 
tion of the Scripture, and offered 
prayer. Reports were then given by 
Paul Emenheiser and Ethel Hower on 
'Roads to the City of God", a book 
describing the recent Jerusalem Con- 
ference of the International Mission- 
ary Conference. Mr. Emenheiser 
stressed four things necessary to meet 
the new world situation, namely, 
new knowledge, unity of purpose, 
spiritual dynamic, and new leader- 
ship. Miss Hower showed that sin- 
cerity is the main requisite in meet- 
ing a changing world situation. She 
also related the methods and topics 
used at the conference. After a 
prayer circle, Dr. Jones pronounced 
a benediction. Following the meet- 
ing, the group enjoyed a social hour 
during which Mrs. Jones served deli- 
cious refreshments. 





o 

INFORMAL MEETING 

OF FRENCH STUDENTS 



The advanced students of French 
are having an opportunnity these 
days to use their knowledge of irreg- 
ular French verbs and are eagerly 
exhuming forgotten vocabulary when 
they gather for informal conversa- 
tion in French at the home of Mis 
Stella Johnson each Wednesday even- 
ing. 

Although the group have as yet 
•effected no definite organization 
some of the girls have been contrib- 
uting to the entertainment of thes 
evenings. At the first meeting Mar 
19» Elizabeth Hoy told several anec- 
dotes in French, while at the second 
meeting on March 26 Mary Rank 
sa ng some old French ballods. 

Whenever a group of seniors get 
together the conversation enevitably 
turns to practice teaching. As ail 
those present on Wednesday were 
seniors, the girls were soon exchang- 
ln g notes on neophyte experiences 
While edequate expressions in the 

ren ch tongue might sometimes have 
be en lacking, the ideas themselves 
Were never wanting. The girls will 
* e ave their own enviroments next 
Week to discuss and read some French 
Poetry. 

Those who composed the informal 
| r °up this week were Mrs. Jane 
J^ne, Mary Showers, Corinne Dyne, 
j^zabeth Hoy, Mary Rank, Ruth 
hooper, Dorothy Hyland, Ruth March, 
Ester Angstadt. Miss Miriam 
Mu th of the class of '29 was also a 
Member of the group. 



COLLEGE CALENDAR 



Thursday, March 27 — 

Girls inter-class Basketball 
game. Sophomores vs. Fresh- 
men. 

Friday, March 27 — 

Literary Societies Meetings 
Sunday, March 30 — 

Y. M. and Y. W. 
Monday, March 31 — 

Dbate at Albright 
Tuesday, April 1 — 

Girls Basketball, Seniors vs. 
Sophomores. 
Thursday, April 3 — 

Girls Baskfletball, Juniors 
vs. Freshmen. 



QUITTIE SALES 

CAMPAIGN 



REPORT 



SENIOR CAGE STARS 
TRIM JUNIOR COEDS 

MATCH OPENS GIRLS 
INTER-CLASS 
SERIES 



Y. M CABINET 
OFFICERS ELECTED 



The Seniors successfully issued 
forth from the first game of the in- 
ter-class series by defeating the Jun- 
iors to the tune of 38 to 22. The 
game was played Tuesday afternoon, 
March 25, beforea large and appre- 
ciative audience. 

The game was a whirlwind of ac- 
tion from beginning to end. Quick 
accurate passes were the feature of 
the contest. Both teams fought hard 
for their classes but the seniors seem- 
ed unbeatable. With Knaub as the 
scoring ace for the seniors, rolling 
in basket after basket, the juniors 
soon were at a loss and' held up the 
short end of the score. Knaub and 
Weigel, senior stars, plaing in the 
Weigel, senior stars, playing in the 
for Light and Young, playing for the 
Juniors. They kept their forwards 
well supplied with the ball. 

Knaub scored high for the seniors, 
being accountable for 22 of the 38 
points. Fischer brought in 12 of the 
22 points for the juniors. 

With this victory from their in- 
itial game, the seniors have a good 
chance to win the title. 
Seniors u 
R. F. Morrow, 7 ° t 

R. J. Schlickter 1 2 

L. J. Knaub 9 4 22 

C. Keuner (Capt.) 

S. C. Weigel 

R. G. Saylor 

L. G. Gordon 

Juniors 

R. F. Fischer (Capt) 4 4 
L. F. Stayer 1 

L. J. Young 4 

C. Light ° 

S. C. Young ° n 

S. C. Thomason 

R. G. Sheddy JJ 

L. G. Levan 

L. G. Binner 



The Y. M. C. A. elected its officers 
for the coming year the latter part 
of last week. Fred Christman was 
reelected president. Other officers 
are: 

Vice-president Fred Mund 

Secretary Chester Goodman 

Treasrer Paul Keinfelter 

Pianist J. Robert Eshelman 

The remaining members of the 
new cabinet are: 

Freshman Committee R. Roudabush 
Devotional and Program Committee 
Francis Barr, John Morris 
Social Committee .... Willard Trezise 
George Nye 

Publicity Fred Morrison 

Star Course Charles Wise 



Business Manager Becker of the 
Quittie Sales Campaign Committee 
reports an encouraging increase in 
the results of this week's drive over 
that of last week. The committee 
has been quite active in its personal 
interview work, and expects to con- 
clude the drive in the near future. In 
the main, the cooperation of the stu- 
dent body has been excellent. The 
committee extends its thanks for this 
cooperation and hopes that all who 
have not already subscribed will do 
so at once. 

Following is a report of the re- 
sults up to Wednesday, March 26: 

Senior Men Dorm Students 95.2% 

Senior Men Day Students 76.9% 

Senior Women Dorm Students 64.9% 
Senior Women Day Students.. 100.0%- 
Class— 84.2% 

Soph Men Dorm Students 64.7 % 

Soph Men Day Students 76.9 % 

Soph Women Dorm Students....l00.0% 

Soph Women Day Students 44.4% 

Class— 60.2% ' 

Frosh Men Dorm Students 78.6% 

Frosh Men Day Students 32.3% 

Frosh Women Dorm Students.. 64.0% 
Frosh Women Day Students-. 57.1% 
Class— 58.0% 
Juniors 100.0% o 
^-O ■ 



MUSIC STUDENTS 
ARE ENTERTAINED 



o 

MRS. BENDER HOLDS 
ST. PATRICK'S 
PARTY 



MPHK SWAMP 

FROSH 39-17 



EARLY LEAD NETS CAGE 
VICTORY IN SENATE 
GAME 



-O- 



STUDENT VOULTEERS 

AT PALMYRA U. B. 



The Student Volunteer Group of 
the college took charge of the Christ 
ian Endeavor meeting at the First 
U. B. Church of Palmyra on Sunday, 
March 23, at 6:30 P. M. The pro 
gram consisted of the following num- 
bers: Quartet by C. Oscar Goodman 
John Snyder, J. Calvin Keene, and 
Paul Keene; Talk on "Why Should 
We Belong to Church" by J. Calvin 
Keene; Quartet number; Talk on 
"Foriegn Missions" by Ruth Cooper; 
Prayer by Harry Zeck; A musical 
reading by Ruth Cooper, And a fin 
al quartet number. Madeline Rife 
was pianist for the quartet and the 
musical reading, and arrangements 
were made by Fred Mund, chairman 
of the deputation committee. 

The following are some of the "man 
-sized" punishments handedout by 
the governing bodies of neighboring 
colleges to their straying Frosh. 
Dickinson because a Frosh was found 
yithout matches he must carry a 
basket filled with matches for upper 
classmen and must wear a sign which 
reads "Match Me". 

At Gettysburg a Frosh talked to 
a girl and must wear two dresses, a 
red heart, a red sash and a large 
box. 



The Sophomore basketball team de- 
feated the Freshman squad last night 
in the Alumni Gymnasium in' the an- 
nual traditional under-classmen game. 
During the first half the plebes were 
submerged by the scOre of 21-6. The 
final score was 39-17. 

After the Sophomores had acquired 
a considerable lead they inserted 
their entire second-string team. The 1 
Freshmen, however, made no greater 
progress against them than against 
the first team. 

The only time the first year men 
showed any basketball at all was in 
the early part of the second half 
when they outscored their opponents 
for a time. 

The game was unnecessarily rough 
at times with the result that two men 
were forced out of the game on per- 
sonal fouls. 

It was the shooting of Leathan and 
Pickle that ruined' any hopes which 
the Frosh might have entertained 
These two boys could not be stopped 
Lechthaler also deserves commenda 
tion for his work at guard. 

(Continued on Page 4") 

HALLMAN° RETURNS 



A delightful St. Patrick's Party 
was held last Thursday afternoon at 
three o'clock, by Mrs. Andrew Bender 
who entertained the girls of the Con- 
servatory at her home on Maple 
street. 

Mrs. Mary C. Green and Miss Hilda 
Florry assisted Mrs. Bender in re-- 
ceiving the guests amidst a most at- 
tractive background of cut flowers 
and unique green and white crepe 
paper decorations. 

Bridge and Five Hundred were 
then enjoyed by the guests, after 
which tea W i as served. Mrs. Green 
and Miss Florry presided at the tea 
and chocolate while Miss Mary Buf- 
fington and Miss Ruth Armacost as- 
sisted in serving most delicious dam- 
ties. After dancing to a few radio 
selections, the girls departed, feeling 
that thy had spent a most enjoyable 
afternoon and expressing tneir 
thanks to Mrs. Bender, who proved • 
as usual, a charming hostess. 

Those girls who were entertained 
were: The Misses Hilda Hess, Olive 
Weigel, Alcesta Slichter, Dorothy 
Boyer, Helen Hain, Madeline Rife, 
Mary Showers, Mildred Myers, Mary 
Rank, Myrtle Murr, Margaret Young, 
Elizabeth Flook, Cynthia Benzing, 
Eleanor Houck, Helen Groh, Dorothy 
Snyder, Dorothy Haldemann, Hester 
Thompson, Edith Fields, Mary K. 
Goshert, Gladys Wagner, Alma Clark, 
Ruth Coble, Marion Kruger, and 
Kathryn Lutz. 

O 



"Shorty" Hallman, Freshman day 
student and son of Rev. Hallman of 
Harrisburg, resumed his college work 
on Monday after an illness of several 
weeks. He is somewhat the worse 
for his experience, physically speak- 
ing, but the old broad grin and 
hearty laugh are still there. 



L. V. REPRESENTED 

AT STATE COUNCIL 

L. V. G. was well represented at 
the district meeting of the State Stu- 
dent Council of the Y. M. C. A. at 
Harrisburg, Friday, March 21. The 
delegation was made up of old and 
new members, namely, Lester Kauf- 
man, Fred W. Mund, Paul Kleinfel- 
ter, George Nye, and C. Oscar Good- 
man. The report of Lebanon Valley's 
Work, as reported by Fred Mund, 
compared very favorably with those 
of the other colleges. Ideas were ex- 
changed by the various delegates at 
a general discussion which followed 
the reports. Short Talks by Dr. Poul- 
son and Mr. Leo H. Kohl, the stu- 
dent secretary, proved very helpful 
and inspiring. Lester Kaufman closed 
the session with prayer, and the dele- 
gates started on their homeward 
journeys. 

O 

DEBATE WITH 

JUNIATA POSTPONED 

The debate between the local Af- 
firmatives and the negative team of 
Juniata College scheduled for Wed- 
nesday evening, March 26 at Jun- 
iata has been indefinitely postponed 
due to the decease of Juniata's Pres- 
ident, ex-govenor Brumbaugh. The 
time for the debate will be announced 
later. 



3AGE TWO 



LA VIE COLLEGI ENNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 27, 1930 



ESTABLISHED 1925 



A. wMkly publication by the Under* 
graduate Students of Lebanon 
Valley College 



SDITOSUL ST ATP 

Russel Etter, '31 Editor-in-Chief 

Ruth Liller, '31 Associate Edito 

R. Roudabush, '31 .... Associate Editor 
R .Morgan, '31 .... Managing Editor 

BXPOBTO&IAL STAX-r 

Robert Eshleman, '31 

Madeline Sheddy, '31 

Ruth Shroyer, '32 

Hilda Buckley, '32 

Walter Krumbeigel, '33 

General Reporters 

Mary Goshert, '32 Conservatory 

Robert Rawhouser, '32 Athletics 

Dorothy Garber, '32 Clionian 

Mary Epply, '32 Delphian 

Percy Clements, '33 Kalozetean 

Fred Mund, '32 Philokosmian 

Edna Early, '31 .... Alumni Reporter 



BUSINESS STAJFF 

G. Becker, '31 .... Business Manager 

P. Keene, '32 Asst. Business Manager 

C. Wise, '31 Circulation Manager 



FACULTY ADVISORS 

Dr. Paul A. W. "Wallace, English Dept. 

Miss Mary K. Wallace, English Dept 

Dr. Paul S. Wagner, Math. Dept 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE. a member 
of the Intercollegiate Newspaper Asso- 
ciation of the Middle Atlantic States 



Single Copies 10 cents 

Subscription $1.50 per year 

Entered at the Annville, Pa., post- 
office as second class matter under the 
Act of March 3. 1879. 



DOES IT PAY? 



The question: Does a college course 
pay? has been answered so many 
times and so decisively in the affirm- 
ative that few indeed can be found 
who will support the negative side of 
the argument. One of the remarkable 
aspects of the situation, however, is 
the change in the attitude of the bus 
iness world toward the college man 
apparent in recent years. An article 
by Rita S. Halle entitled "What'll 1 
Do Now?", published in the April is 
sue of McCall's Magazine, calls at 
tention to this change. Miss Halle 
quotes the head of a large corpora 
tion as follows: 

"We certainly have capitulated to 
the college graduate in the last few 
years. Up to that time his lack of 
success in business was part of the 
orthodox gospel, the legitimate sub 
ject for mirth-inspiring cartoons. If 
the college graduate wanted to get 
into business, he carefully concealed 
his sheepskin as he journeyed dis- 
consolately from office to office. Now 
he no longer needs to journey at all. 
We, on the other hand, go to seek him 
at the college gate." 

This change of attitude is most en- 
couraging, and is significant to stu- 
dents of Lebanon Valley in the light 
of the phenomenal increase in the en- 
rollment of our department of Busi- 
ness Administration noticeable in the 
last few years. The cause of this 
change is undoubtedly the increased 
tendency toward' a practical applica- 
tion of the material taught the stu- 
dent. He is urged to keep in tune 
with the world around him, and as a 
result he becomes alert, energetic, 
wide-awake — just the sort of man the 
business world needs. The very fact 
that he has completed a college course 
means that he is a member of a more 
or less select group; the less capable 
have been weeded out along the line. 

Business men are not primarily 
looking for a mastery of subject mat- 
ter, however. Initiative, far-sighted- 
ness, ambition, the ability to think 
and act independently — these are the 
materials with which they wish to 
work. Nor will a partial course meet 
the requirements; competition is too 
keen for the two or three year man 
to stay in the running. Graduates 



are demanded. 

This trend is but another indicator 
of the changes that have so rapidly 
overtaken society. Standards are 
rising; education is assuming a place 
of ever-increasing importance in the 
social framework. As is true of ah 
other fields, "business is becoming 
more and more complex; and the few 
months or even years that formerly 
served to teach a bright boy all he 
needed to know about it, are no long 
er of any avail, even in a small or 
ganization." In every occupation, the 
odds are on the man who plugs away 
until he finishes his job, the man who 
sticks, like the postage stamp, until 
he get there. 



LOST! CHAPEL HOOTERS 



"Will those children on the gal- 
lery be quiet when the show begins, 
or d you think I should speak to 
them about it?" This was the posi- 
tive apprehension expressed by the 
director of the first star course pro- 
gram to a student when "the child 
ren" were hooting, cat-calling, and 
in general producing pandemonium 
as a preliminary to the raising of the 
first curtain. "The children" were 
none other than our grown-up col- 
legiate males who insist by their ob- 
^treperousness upon disgracing the 
college in the eyes of our visitors 
every time a chapel entertainment 
is given. 

The "L" Varsity Club sponsored 
an illustrated lecture last Tuesday 
evening. The male students were 
out almost 100 per cent. The conduct 
on the gallery among the male group 
was without a question that of gen- 
tlemen. Where were the hooters 
and the cat-callers ? They were right 
among that group, their energies 
merely suspended until the next en- 
tertainment or anniversary. 

One of the ambitions of almost 
every man on this campus is to be- 
come a member of the Varsity "L" 
Club. The influence of this organi- 
zation must be conceded to be excep- 
tionally strong, since it can bring 
forth model behavior where other- 
wise might exist a thoughtless group 
of gallery malefactors. We stage 
pageants and plays with our local 
cast. When a situation is presented 
to which we ourselves attach a hum- 
orous interpretation, we burst into 
ifriughter, regardless of the actors' 
feelings or the fact that our own 
attitude, as the audience, may ruin 
the production on which these peo 
pie have been working. The same 
Jack of sympathy has been evident 
repeatedly when guest troupes have 
been playing on our stage. The lec- 
ture on Tuesday offered many op- 
portunities for local allusions in the 
lights of our campus humor. Never- 
theless, the audience, especially the 
gallery, maintained throughtout a 
jprofound attitude of restraint and 
respect. 

We have a group of men on our 
campus who are as polished in their 
manners as those on any other cam- 
pus in this country can show. The 
attitude of the men at the "L" Club 
entertainment is our conclusive evi- 
dence for maintaining this state- 
ment. Why do we not always attend 
the entertainments in Engle Hall with 
this spirit? Let us hang out the 
"dorm" windows to do our hooting 
and cat-calling, if that is our occa- 
sional inclination, but at our enter- 
tainments let us conduct ourselves 
as men whom visitors will consider 
well-bred and cultured. 

O 

SELFISHNESS 



analysis; all other subjects became 
matters of secondard importance; self 
was the center of his universe. And 
as all men of his type inevitably dis- 
cover, a self -centered universe be- 
came to small, too mean, too crowd- 
ed and stuffy and drab. He could not 
stand the strain of it all; he could 
not play the game. So like the coward 
that he was, he threw down his weap- 
ons and quit. 

There is something tragic in the 
occurance, as well as something sig- 
nificant that we may well heed. In 
these days of intense individualism, 
personal liberty, phycho-analysis and 
all the rest of it, there are entirely 
too many young and promising lives 
being warped by an excessive amount 
of self-consideration. No man, how- 
ever perfect, can long examine him- 
self as the modern trend would dic- 
tate without discovering a great many 
flaws. To contemplate those flaws 
exclusive of all other considerations, 
to brood over them and foundle them 
— this cannot fail to produce a 
thoroughly unwholesome and pessi- 
mistic attitude of mind, a dominant 
inferiority complex. 

The college student is especially ex- 
posed to this danger. In the brief 
space of four years, he must digest 
such a mass of material that that 
assimilation alone is apt to produce 
intellectual dyspepsia. And then to 
bolt down a lot of the pernicious trash 
that the modern, pseudo — psycholo- 
gists, Freud included, are dumping 
upon the market — well thank good- 
ness the curriculum of L. V. C. con- 
tains none of it. 

The point we are making is sim- 
ply this: Selfishness is not only mean, 
it is dangerous. The best cure in 
the world for pessimism is to discov- 
er that there are a lot of other folks 
in the universe who are worthy of 
our consideration. Get out into the 
broad swim of things, take a few 
bold strokes and, all the psycho-an- 
alysts under the sun can't convince 
you that life's a sour mess, unworthy 
of your efforts. But sit down and 
brocd over your own tragic weakness- 
es and before long you too will quit 
be cause you are "fed up" on your- 
self. 




Among Our Seniors 




LESTER MILLARD KAUFFMAN MILDRED ELIZABETH MYERS 



-O- 



We observe by a recent news item 
in the daily press that a young man 
pf excellent connections and fine pros- 
pects committed suicide because, as 
a written note explained, he was "fed 
up" on himself. He had spent an 
absolute maximum of time on self- 



FROSH THOUGHT 

The students in the English 16 de- 
partment have recently been produc- 
ing themes that contain some inter- 
esting observations on various sub- 
jects from the Frosh point of view. 
Apropos of the season, we are releas- 
ing the following sample of Fresh- 
man Philosophy entitled: 

SPRING FEVER 
Spring fever is a very bad sickness, 
especially in my case. I succumbed 
to it about eighteen years ago and 
have never gotten over it. I do not 
know if doctors prescribe any rem- 
edy for it or not but I am beginning 
to think that in the case of a chronic 
invalid like myself the matter should 
be looked into. 

This illness mostly effects my mind. 
Now, of course, I don't mean to say 
that I agree with those among my 
acquaintances who call me crazy. Far 
from it. You know I've always 
thought that it took a lot of ambi- 
tion to be really crazy. Crazy peo- 
ple always jump around and shout or 
else they are continually thinking 
about something. Now I've done some 
jumping round and shouting in my 
time but not even my own mother 
ever accused me of having a thought. 
So that when I say that my illness is 
mental I mean that my mind rebels 
against hard usage. For example 
writing an essay always gives me an 
acute pain. I dread to think of the 
life I would have ted had I been rich. 
Never being over burdened with 
money, however, I had great diffi- 
culty in deciding what I wanted to 
make my life's work. I remember 



Here's a fellow who doesn't smoke, 
doesn't chew and absolutely refuses 
to use profane language no matter 
what the provocation may be, but he 
does enjoy a prank on the Frosh. 

Usually he's quiet and reticent and 
also is said to be rather shy of the 
opposite sex. But every Wednesday 
and Friday nights he mysteriously 
leaves the "Dorm". We wonder why? 

Les is also well liked by the fel- 
lows and as a result has been elect- 
ed President of the Kalozetean Lit- 
erary Society. 

Next year he will no doubt enter 
some theological seminary as he is 
entering the ministry, and surely few 
are more talented than he to preach 
the Gospel. 

Les came to Lebanon Valley after 
a year at Catawba College but in 
his three years he has been activelly 
engaged in all serious activities on 
the campus. He has at various times 
held offices in his society, the Y. M. 
C. A. and the Ministeruim and is 
now president of this last organiza- 
tion. All in all, we agree in pro- 
claiming Les a mighty fine fellow. 



my childish ambition was to be a 
hobo. They never work; they al- 
ways travel; and who ever saw a 
hobo wash? In fact their entire exis- 
tence seems ideal. But, alas! my 
family had other ideas as to how my 
future should be spent. Various sug- 
gestions were offered but none seem- 
ed to "click". For every type of 
work one should have special ability. 
For what was I best suited? I'm still 
wondering. I must say that if I have 
special talent along any line it is ad- 
mirably concealed. 

There must be some excuse for 
having a character like this, but the 
best alibi I can find is spring fever. 
It may be a bit far fetched and long 
lasting but never the less I'll stick to 
it. Folks, I've got spring fever. 



Sit back, folks, and let us tell y ou 
something of the local talent. Miss 
Myers you know, r don't know, hails 
from Annville, Pennsylvania. 

Four years ago she entered these 
learned halls so that she might cope 
better with the viscissitudes of this 
cruely cruel world as others before 
ner have done or will do after her 
And now that her time is up, armed 
with the magic word "Rumplesnitz", 
sally forth she will. Here's luck to 
her! 

Mildred is an extremely quiet in- 
dividual, but do not let this lead you 
into believing that she does nothing. 
Nay, nay, anything but that. She 
plays the organ in chapel, practices 
teaching, assists the Latin prof, 
teaches Sunday School and invests 
her time in innumerable other activ- 
ities. 

Of course she has her preferences. 
She enjoys music and those that have 
heard her perform at either the or- 
gan or piano will acknowledge her 
proficiency. Also she enjoys listening 
to the radio, likes to read and play 
tennis. No doubt there is more but 
this is all that has reached our ears. 



-o- 



BUSINESS STUDENTS 

ARE INTERVIEWED 



ALBERT ACADEMY 

CAMPAIGN CLOSES 



The "Lebanon Valley in Africa" 
drive which was in progress the past 
few weeks, came to a close officially 
with an impressive consecration ser- 
vice in Chapel Friday morning Mar. 
21. Students still have the opportun- 
ity to make contributions to the Al- 
bert Academy fund. Anyone wish- 
ing to do so may see either Grace 
Keener or John Snyder Chairmen of 
the drive. Although the total amount 
raised by the drive is not known as 
contributions are still being receiced 
the results are very gratifying the 
students have responded splendidly. 



O- 



In accordance with the policy pur- 
sued in recent years, the Dept. of 
Business Administration is at the 
present time endeavoring to place its 
students adavantageously. Mr. Car- 
ter and Mr. Orth, representatives of 
the Bell Telephone C01., from the 
main offices at Harrisburg, interview- 
ed a number of business students on 
Wednesday, March 26 with a view to 
securing such of them as may be fit- 
ted for the work f their corporation. 
Several graduates have been placed' 
with this company in former years, 
and are now making steady advance- 
ment. 

O 

The administration at the Univer r 
sity of Denver declares that no girl 
may speak to a man. The powers 
claim that they can do their love- 
making off the campus. They came 
here to study. Such a school must 
have a large class in astronomy. 



HISTORY CLUB 

HOLDS SESSION 



"Prohibition" was the topic discus- 
sed by the History Club on Wednes- 
day, March 26. Dean Salada opened 
the program with a talk on "Stricter 
Enforcement." He showed the good 
already done, and the need for P<>P' 
ular support. He closed his speech 
with a plea to keep America dry- 
Grace Keener followed with a talk on 
"Repeal". She gave the reasons ex- 
tant for repeal of the eighteenth a ~ 
mendment, especially including tne 
opinions of prominent men. The last 
talk was given by Mary Snyder who 
After showing how the Literary D 1 ' 
gest vote favored modification an 
repeal, she told of the plans of mod- 
ification. A general discussion * e 
by Prof Stevenson closed the P r0 ' 
gram with some very interesting 
points. ' 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 27, 1930 



PAGE THREE 




"A COLLEGE JOKE TO CURE THE 'BLUES' " 

— Jonathan Swift. 



Slim — I hear they're starting a new campaign against malaria. 
Arline — Good heavens! What have the Malarians done now? 

— LVC— 
Skipper — Say, have you got a goal ? 
Sailor — Sure, one in every port. 

— LVC— 

What do you mean by the witching hour? 

When your wife greets you in the early morning with, "Well, which story 
is it this time ? " 

— LVC— 

Undertaker — Rastus, your mother-in-law just died. 
Rastus — Is you sure 'bout dat? 
Undertaker — Shall I bury her or embalm her? 
Rastus — Don't let's take no chances, brother. Cremate her! 

— LVC— 

"I've got a Sherlock Holmth tooth," lisped the fair young thing. 
"What sort of tooth?" 
" 'SLooth." 

— LVC— 

Doorman at a Speakeasy — Who's there? 
Voice — It is I. 

Doorman — No school-teachers allowed. 

—LVC— 

Reporter — What news? What news? 

Juror — We find the defendant not guilty of murder. 

Reporter — Coises. No noose. 

— LVC— 

Shorty — You kiss just like Greta Garbo 
Lenora — What! Have you been two-timing me ? 

— LVC— 

Gardner — I'm going to be a surgeon, 
Moose — Not me! Too much inside work. 

— LVC— 

Phil—Why is the National Biscuit Company financing an African expe- 
dition? 

Bill — They want to get some new designs for their animal crackers. 

— LVC— 

Miss Wallace — Why did' you spell 'pneumatic' "newmatic" ? 
Billy — The 'K' on my typewriter isn't working. 

—LVC— 

Mary— I hear that the flea circus got stranded in Allentown. 
Frosty — Yes, the leading lady ran off with a poodle. 

— LVC— 

Where are you working now ? 
A. and P. 

Oh, you're one of the chain gang. 

— LVC— 

p roof Reader— Hey, you got this '99 and 44-100 per cent pure' slug in 



KAPPA LAMBDA SIGMA 



*at vaudeville add. 



-LVC-- 



He— Where do you think I'd be if I had a million dollars ? 
She — On my honeymoon. 

— LVC— 
Chestnut hair and hazel eyes, 

Not too dumb and not too wise. 
Could be worse and could be better; 

Guess I'll answer her last letter. 

B ELIEVE IT OR NOT- 

not A girl may wear golf togs and not play golf ' or wear a bathing suit and 
1 go near the water, but, kid, when she puts on a wedding gown she means 
"usiness. 

b Ethel Hower said she'd love to go" to the S. V. Convention in Lancaster 
she was afraid she might get lost, 
^gham Young said 'Give us this day our daily bride.' 
Va c tty Le Fevre is P atient] y waiting for a second bloom to appear on 1 
tQ . Some girls are so trusting! 
2 w oman's instinct is what tells her she's right whether she is or not. 
^ stag i s nobody's fool. 
J;hough it is not generally kn wn, snails never use asbestos brake-linings, 
a *, . ere Wa s a Scotchman who took caviar in capsules so as not to acquire 
taste for the stuff. 
* w oman needs a chaperon until she can call some chap her own. 
etty Black thinks 'curtail' is a dog story. 



Kalozeteans enjoyed a well-balanc- 
ed program at their regular meeting 
last Friday evening. Devotions were 
led by John Morris the society chap- 
lain. The banjo artist, "Doc" Wil- 
lard and "Long-shot" Speg once a- 
gain favored their many listeners 
with songs new and old. They play- 
ed the "Vagabond Lover," "Chant of 
the Jungle" and used "Should I" as 
an encore. Benjamin Geyer took the 
place of the news reel and presented 
a "talkie" of the day's news. His 
report gave light on many scientific 
discoveries that have been read re- 
cently. Johnnie Morris with his 
trusty harmonica furnished the so- 
ciety with the classical selections 
necessary to make the program en- 
joyable for lovers of music ofthat 
type. Noll surprised his listeners 
when he gave a delightful report on 
"The origin of the Bath Tub an-di 
Shower Bath" instead of some chem- 
ical discovery or scientific research. 
The talks was instructive as well as 
entertaining and Mr. Noll convinc- 
ed his audience that chemists some- 
times think of other things than cal- 
cium carbonate and the like. Wil- 
liam Spangler rendered a very good 
report on "The Problems of the Mod- 
ern Chemists." Mr. Spangler seem- 
ed well acquainted with the subject 
and gave many interesting and bene- 
ficial statements. The program was 
brought to a close with an old time 
but appropiate selection, "The Little 
Brown Jug" played by Kalo's Banjo 
Aces — Willard and Speg. 

The Kalozetean Literary Society will 
present three one-act plays on the 
night of their anniversary April 5th, 
instead of "The Circle" that had been 
previously announced. Practices are 
being held daily under the director- 
ship of Miss Mary K. Wallace. Miss 
Wallace, who is well known on the 
campus and elsewhere for her dra- 
matic and coaching ability, predicts 
great success in this somewhat new 
venture. 

The first play "The Glittering 
Gate" is a comedy of rare quality. 
In its cast appear "Dusty" Rhodes, 
who scored a big hit in "The Truth", 
and Johnnie Morris another capable 
performer. The setting of this play 
is an unusual one and the audience 
will witness side-splitting scenes from 
the popular "hereafter". 

"Thursday Evening" another of 
the plays, deals with the squabbles of 
a young married couple and 1 the un- 
tiring effort and scheming of the two 
mothers to bring them together. The 
man and wife are played by Edgar 
Shroyer and Anne Kiehl while Eva 
Peck and Trula Kock act as the two 
interested mothers. This play pre- 
sents many scenes from everyday 
life and promises to be entirely dif- 
ferent from the ordinary. 

The third play "The Moonshiner" 
is as good as the name suggests. It 
deals with the much talked-of moun- 
tain life in North Carolina. Wm. 
Speg plays the part of the moon- 
shiner and is expected to do excep- 
tionally well in the part. Joe 
Hutchinson, well known in dramatics 
here, will handle the role of the ad- 
venturous revenue officer. The group 
consists of three of the best plays 
that could be obtained, and under the 
capable direction of Miss Wallace a 
very enjoyable program is assured 
for the evening of April 5th. 

O 

DELTA LAMBDA SIGMA 



er, chaplain; Ruth Siller, critic; 
Marion Kruger and Arlene Heckrote, 
wardens. Because of absence, Mary 
K. Goshert will be installed as pian- 
ist, at a later meeting. Miss iieisier 
opened her term ol administration oy 
delivering an appropriate aaciress, in 
which she reau tne rreamDie oi trie 
■Society Constitution, and voiced ne* 
desire to promote tne literary activ- 
ity of the society to a greater cegree 
than it has been promoted in tne 
past; it is the hope ot every sincere 
oeiphian that this will be accom- 
plished. 

A well-planned program was then 
rendered. ihe first number was a 
piano solo by Glaays Wagner; tnis 
was played with mucn skill ana tecn- 
nique and won tne applause of the 
audience. A vocal selection, '"Vale", 
was aiso given by Dorothy Boyer; 
this was sung with a depth of feeiing 
and was greatly appreciated by an. 
A final number was a skit, "j&eier- 
ences Required", presented by mane 
Gelwicks, Henrietta Wagner, anu 
Augusta Trachte. Being members oi 
the "Cultured Ciub", Miss Gelwicks 
and Miss Wagner were supposedly 
well-informed in all topics oi inter- 
est, in everything from the "Lake 
Poets", Patriotism, and Religion, t«> 
clothes and insurance policies. When 
they came to the library, however, to 
plan a year's program for the club, 
their "culture" failed to operate in 
the proper manner, and they nearly 
drove their competent, young librar- 
ian, Augusta Trachte, to distraction 
by their silly chattering and indefinite 
demands for references. The scene 
was typical of an occurrence which 
might take place between two grad- 
uates of L. V. C, ten years hence. 
The wit and humor imparted by the 
actors provoked much laughter, and 
quite delighted the audience. 

After a brief business session, the 
meeting adjourned for the evening. 
O 

"Let's go" has been given a new 
interpretation by the students of 
Princeton. One of the Profs, gave 
an examination which was not to 
their liking or else was to stiff for 
them whereupon the students shout- 
ed "Let's go", and walked out on the 
prof. This is a new and decidedly 
improved meaning for the phrase. 




On the Saturday evening of Janu- 
ary 19, 1918, eighty students and 
faculty members of L. V. C. went to 
Lebanon to hear the Hon. William 
Howard Taft, ex-president of the 
United States, who recently died. Mr. 
Taft was brought to Lebanon 
through the efforts of the Lebanon 
Chamber of Commerce. The pro- 
ceeds were given to the Red Cross. 

The subject of Mr. Taft's address 
was the subject common to most 
speakers of that time, "The Great 
War." In his discussion of this great 
topic Mr. Taft revealed his vast 
knowledge of international affairs. 
He made it clear to the audience what 
was the cause of the war and follow- 
ed its developments. 

Everyone was given the privilege 
after the program to meet Mr. Taft 
personally. 

O 




In the fall of the year 1915 Mrs. 
J. Hal Smith, who so interestingly 
spoke to us in chapel this year, spoke 
to the students also. She portrayed 
an intensity of feeling a,nd devotion 
to her work as she told of the crude, 
meagre and superstitious life of the 
people among whom she was work- 
ing on the frontier mission field .n 
Africa. 

Mrs. Smith told of such cruelties 
as burying supposed lawless people 
alive, strangling the aged' and feed- 
ing babies to beasts and birds. These 
atrocities, fortunately, have since 
been largely eliminated. 

Mrs. Smith also said that the en- 
slaving of the Negro for the use of 
the American has been remembered 
by the African. "This fear of the 
people with white faces must be com- 
batted by the exemplary life of the 
missionaries," said Mrs. Smith. 
"Theirs is a life of sacrifice and con- 
secration to a noble work and they 
need more and more recruits." 



1 FOR ADVANCE COAT OR DRESS | 

1 DON'T FAIL TO VISIT | 

ROSE SINGER SHOP I 

761 CUMBERLAND ST. LEBANON, PA. | 

1 1 



At the regular weekly meeting of 
Delphian Literary Society on Friday 
evening the third term officers were 
installed. In a fitting service the fol- 
lowing were ushered into their new 
places of honor: Dorothy Heister, 
president; Grace Keener, vice presi- 
dent; Dorothy Thompson, recording 
secretary; Henrietta Wagner, corre- 
sponding secretary; Sarah Ensming- 



PARKER FOUNTAIN PENS 

GUARANTEE D FOR LIFE 

Two Pens in One— A Desk Pen and a Pocket Pen. 
Ask To See Them. 

ESBENSHADE'S BOOK STORE 



38 N. 8th St. 



Lebanon, Pa. 



CLOTHING OF QUALITY 

JSBASEHORE 

Lebanon, Pa. 



Shaeffer's Lifetime Pens — 

NONE BETTER ABSOLUTELY GUARANTEED 

AN EVERYDAY NECESSITY FOR 
COLLEGE STUDENTS 

■W--T A. T% tit^ T J O "^k® ^* Store of Lebanon 
H A-KFrv-L O 757-759 Cumberland Street 



4 



PAGE FOUR 



LA VIE COLLEGI ENNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 27, 1930 



Faculty Notes 



Miss Yvonne Green of Baltimore 
Md. is spending her spring vacation 
as the guest of her mother Mrs. Green 
dean of women. 

Dr. Paul Wallace is again meet- 
ing his classes after being confined 
to his home for several days because 
of illness. 

Professor Grimm and Stevenson 
are changing their places of residence 
this week. The former moving to 
Main St. and the latter to Mount 
Gretna. 

O 



JUNIORS LOSE 

IN CAGE TILT 



Y. W. NOTES 



An unusually interesting discussion 
took place at the "Friendly Hour", 
on Sunday evening. The program 
was in charge of Gladys Knaub, and 
was built up on the theme, "Finding 
our Place in Life". 

The meeting opened with a piano 
preiude played by Alcesta Slicnter. 
The scripture lesson, taken from 
Math. 16: 21-28, was then read by 
Gladys Knaub, who also led the group 
in prayer. Following this, a report 
was given by Sarah Ensminger, on 
Bruce Currey's article "Where does 
Religion Come In?". A vocal solo, 
"Beautiful Garden of Prayer" was 
next rendered by a little week-end 
visitod, Hilda Knaub. "June and Be- 
yond", an article by Arthur Kugh, 
dealing with graduation and posc- 
graduation days, was rendered bp 
Violet Morton, after which a pianu 
solo was given by Dorothy Garber. 
The concluding number on the pro- 
gram was a report on Olive Gouid's 
article, "Opportunities Unlimiced", 
presented by Elizabeth Flook. Prayer 
offered by Marie Gelwicks brought 
the meeting to a close. 

O 

STRAW VOTE 

ON PROHIBITION 



The residents of the Men's Dorm 
took a straw vote on probition Wed- 
nesday, following the lead of the Lit- 
erary Digest Poll. The results were 
quite interesting. Forty votes were 
cast for strict enforcement, nineteen 
i,-for modification and seventeen in 
iavor of repeal. The outcome of the 
Poll, which was rather indecisive, 
however, in view of the small number 
of votes cast, occasioned several quite 
heated discussions among the men. 
Some faces were reported to have 
become quite dejected when the to- 
tals were produced, but of course this 
is merely a rumor and definite infor- 
mation must therefore be withheld. 

The prohibition question was later 
discussed in History 36 class under 
Prof. Stevenson. The votes had really 
been taken with a view to this class 
discussion. 

O 

SUGGESTIONS, PLEASE! 

Did you ever try to squeeze blood 
out of a turnip? Not so easy, eh? 
Well, you ought to try getting enough 
material to fill these columns, Man, 
what a peach of a time! Not a thing 
doing — "All quiet on the Western 
front," and yet, there are those nine 
empty galleys staring the weary edi- 
tor in the face. 

Now a few poems or suggestions 
for comment, or a little extra "dirt" 
would be just the thing, you know. 
You ladies who like to gossip, how 
about blowing some our way ? We'll 
censor it, of course, but really, we 
don't mind the job. Anyway, we're 
going to lose our humility one of 
these days when we decide that we 
know a little bit about journalism, 
so you'd better get busy. 



(Continued from Page i) 

scorers with nine tallies leading 
Saleck, the Sophomore center who 
had seven to his credit. 

JUNIORS 

G. F. Pts. 

Patrizio, f 2 2 6 

Salada, f 2 4 

Barnes, c 

Wood, g 3 3 9 

Spangler, g 10 2 

Rank, g 

Tresize 

Totals 8 5 21 

SOPHOMORES 

G. F. Pts. 

Shortlidge, f 2 4 

Pickle, f 11 

Salck, c 2 3 7 

McKusker, g 10 2 

Lecthaler, 3, 6 

Leathern, 3 6 

Hughes, 10 2 

Totals 12 4 28 

O • 



BEYOND THE CAMPUS 



-0- 



An English professbi- at Syracuse 
declares that the crying need of the 
nation today is bigger and better 
swear words. 

O 

Believing that compulsory chapel 
is not the modern way to bring re- 
ligious participation to the hearts of 
college students, Penn State has 
moved to abandon this brief period 
of daily worship. This proposel which 
was made by the college senate to 
the college board of Trustees will 
be effective with the 1930-31 college 
year. Chapel services will be con- 
tinued as usual except that the stu- 
dents will not be required to attend'. 

The Susquehanna. 

The student council at Amherst col- 
lege has abolished the minor and 
major sport distinction and hereafter 
all athletic shall receive the one let- 
ter regardless of what sport they 
play. It is said that the new rule 
was formed in order to encourage all 
types of sport rather that have the 
students attempt to win letters in the 
major sports only. 

At North Carlonia State three stu- 
dents were expelled for hazing under- 
classman. It seems that these stu- 
dents were unlicensed barbere and' 
beat those who tried to escape the 
cutting edge of the clippers. 
O 

The North German Lloyd liner 
Europa set a new record in trans-at- 
lantic crossings a few days ago by 
surpassing her sister-ship's record, 
the Bremen's by 18 minutes. The 
Europa's time was 4 days 17 hours 
and 6 minutes. The Bremen's time 
was 4 days 17 hours 24 minutes. 

Those Scotchmen surely know their 
/oats — or rather their pipes. Talk 
about Ronson cigarette lighters — 
over in Glasgow the street railway 
company has them all beat. They 
have a professional pipe lighter to do 
nothing but light the pipes of the la- 
borers so as to keep them from wast- 
ing time. An efficiency expert is re- 
sponsible for the idea. We pass it on 
to the Men's Senate as a suggestion 
for a juseful employment for the 
Frosh. But we almost forgot; the 
men must furnish their own tobacco 
and matches, so perhaps its not such 
a useful idea after all. 



SOPHS SWAMP 

FROSH 39-17 

(Continued from Page 1) 

This game was sponsored by the 
Men's Senate. The officials were: 
Wood, referee; Cochrane, timekeep- 
er; Watkins, scorer. 

SOPHOMORES 

G. F. Pts 

Leathan, f 6 12 

Pickle, f 6 1 13 

Salek, c 113 

McKusker, g 2 15 

Lechthaler, g 11 

Kohler, f 

White, c 

Hughes, f 

Shortlidge, g 2 15 

Kinney, g 

Totals I 7 5 39 

FRESHMEN 

G. F. Pts. 

Waughtel, f 10 2 

Buynoski f : 

Saylor, c 4 4 11 

Spey, g 1 2 4 

Zech, g 

Ulrich, f 

Clements, f 

Newcomer, g 

Kozolusky, g 

Totals 6 6 17 



M. H. SMITH 

JEWELER 

Watches at Lowest Prices 
Watch and Clock Repairing 
38 Railroad St. Annville, Pa 



THE PENNWAY ! 

BARBERSHOP j 

i 

N. M. RAUSCH. Prop. 

AnnvilU, Pa. j 



HOFFMAN STEAM PRESS- 
ING 

KEYSTONE HAT CLEANING 

STEYE WORMS 



10 W. Main St 



Annville, IV 



RUSSEL and SPANGLER 

Our Agents At 
LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 
FINKELSTEIN 
Cleaners & Dyers 



PHOTOGRAPHS 



LIVE FOREVER 



Ulrich's Studio 

820 Cumberland St. 



o 

I cannot sing the old songs 
Nor yet the newer ones: 

The neighbors all have heard me 
And now they carry guns! 



PRINTING 




PUBLICATION. 
BOOKS, CATA 
LOGUES, STATION 
ERY, CARDS, TAGS, 
ETC. 

ANNYILLE PRINTING 
COMPANY 

ANNVILLE PA. 



HW MILLER 



HARDWARE 
OF QUALITY 



Annville 



Pa. 



PRINTING 

When you want work 
of the better kind see 

HIESTER— The Printer 



J. E BERLEW 
DEPARTMENT STORE 

Two Doors From Post Office 

Invites your inspection of 
General Merchandise 



ARTISTS SUPPLIES 

Ca nvas, Parchment, Japanese Tissue, 
Fabriano White and Grey Charcoal 
Papers, Whatman's Hot and Cold- 
pressed Papers, Oil, Water and 
Decora Colors, Brushes, Atomizers, 
China Palettes, Drawing Boards, Col- 
ored Crayons and Pencils. 

All high grade materials 

BOLLMANS 

33 South Eighth Street, 
Lebanon, Pa. 



D. L SAYLOR & SONS 

Contractors 

LUMBER AND COAL 

ANNVILLE. PA. 



For 

QUALITY PLUS 

in 

Material and Workmanship 
Repairs at Special Rates 
Go To 

ANNVILLE SHOEMAN 
207 W. Main 



TRY OUR HOME MADE 
SANDWICHES 

QUALITY LUNCH 

BREYER'S ICE CREAM 
A Specialty 

7 E. Main St. Annville, P a> 



For Quality 



Baked Products 



Patronize 



FINK'S BAKERY 

Main Street 



SOCIETY PINS 
Ranging in Price 
from 
$2.75 PLAIN 
to 

>i2.oo CROWN SET 



GRIMMS 



COLLEGE BOOK STORE 



CHEFS 
HOUSE OF GOOD 



Wm. Penn Highway 
Near Annville 



Meals Served at All Hours 
BANQUETS AND PARTIES 
Our Specialty 



KREAMER BROS. 



STEINITE RADIOS 
EASY ELECTRIC WASHER 
COLUMBIA GAS STOVES AND RANGES 
RUGS AND LINOLEUMS 

"House of Better Values" 
FURNITURE AND UNDERTAKING 

328 W. Mam St. Phone 6R3 




DID YOU EVER GET OUR RATES ON BANQUETS 
AND SPECIAL DINNERS? 

THE PENNWAY 

OPPOSITE P. O. 
A FULL LINE OF FRESH PASTRY DAILY 



WELCOME TO 
KALO ANNIVERSARY 
SAT., APR. 5 




it (Mtfliennt 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



DON'T MISS 
"THE WONDERLAND 
OF MEXICO" 



VOLUME VI 



ANNVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA, THURSDAY, APRIL 3, 1930. 



No. 5 



PLANTING PLAN FOR 
CAMPUS APPROVED 



NEW Y. M. AND Y. W. 

CABINETS INSTALLED 



BEAUTY WILL BE 
COMBINED WITH 
USEFULNESS 



As the effort to increase the en- 
dowment of the college nears a suc- 
cessful conclusion other matters 
which have occupied a place of minor 
importance were given consideration 
by the Finance Committee at a recent 
meeting when they considered and 
approved a report made by a com- 
mittee previously appointed to pre 
pare a planting plan for the campus 

We quote the following from the 
report: 

March 28, 1930. 
"The committee appointed to pre- 
pare a planting plan for the purpose 
of beautifying the college campus as 
well as to add to its botanical inter 
est and value offers the following re 
port. 

"Expert technical advice was sought 
and received from Dr. Earnest H 
Wilson, Director of the Arnold Ar- 
boretum, America's Greatest Garden 
Dr. C. Stewart Gager, Director of the 
Brooklyn Botanic Garden, Dr. Dun- 
can S. Johnson, Director of the 
Homewood Botanical Garden at 
Johns Hopkins University, Dr. E. M 

^ Continued on Page 4) 

O 

MANAGER ANNOUNCES 

BASE BALL SCHEDULE 



The new cabinets of the Christian 
Associations were installed, in a very 
beautiful and impressive service, in 
chapel on Wednesday morning. 

Caroline Fisher and Earl Wolf 
sang, "My Task," by Ashford. Cal- 
vin Keene spoke fo rthe retiring Y. 
M. C. A. cabinet, exhorting Fred 
Christman, on behalf of the new cab- 
inet, to carry forward the splendid 
work of the retiring leaders, while 
Ruth Cooper handed to Sara Ens- 
minger, the new Y. W. C. A. presi- 
dent, the candle, symbolizing the pass- 
ing to the new cabinet of the duties 
of the retiring officers. 

Dr. Gossard then addressed the 
new cabinet members, asking that 
they pledge themselves to carry for- 
ward the ideals of their respective 
organizations. The service closed 
with "Follow the Gleam." 





Thirteen games are scheduled for 
our baseball team this season it was 
revealed by the schedule cards circu 
lated among the students lately. All 
the games are with colleges our size 
except the second one which will be 
played with Penn State on their 
diamond. Six other colleges will be 
m et both at home and away. Two 
games will be played each week giv 
ln g a well balanced scheduled for our 
team. 

The boys are in full swing in their 
training. Suits have been handed out 
and the fight is on for the various 
Positions. 

The schedule follows: 

Wednesday, April 23, F. & M 
away. 

Saturday, April 26, Penn State— 
away. 

Tuesday, April 29, Gettysburg— at 
home. 

Saturday, May 3, F. & M. — 1 
home. 

Wednesday, May 1, Ursinus — at 
home. 

Saturday, May 10, Dickinson— at 
home. 

Wednesday, May 14, Susquehan 
at home. 

Saturday, May 17, Dickinson 
away. 

Wednesday, May 21, Albright— 
away. 

Saturday, May 24, Ursinus— away 

Tuesday, May 27, Gettysburg— 
away. 

Friday, May 30, Albright— at home. 

Saturday, June 7, Susquehanna— 
away, 



HILDA HESS CHOSEN 
QUEEN OF MAY 



EXTRA STAR COURSE 

NUMBER OFFERED 



MISS LEAH MILLER WILL 
BE MAID OF 
HONOR 




FROSH YIELD 2313 
YICTORY TO SOPHS 



SECOND-YEAR GIRLS 
LEAD THROUGHOUT 
GAME 



In the second game of the basket- 
ball inter-class series. The sopho- 
more girls defeated! the frosh team 
in a rather close scrimmage with the 
score 23 13, Thursday evening, March 
27, in the alumni gmnasium. 

At no time during the game were 
the sophomores seriously threatened 
by the freshman. The sophs started 
the scoring and kept up a lead 
throughout the entire game. Shrffler 
for the sophs led her team in scoring 
while Wagner was high scorer for 
the freshman. 

The score at the half stood 15-7 
in favor of the second year girls. 

The line-up: G F 

R. F. Sheffler 6 3 15 

L. F. Shroyer 2 4 

L. F. Morton 

L. F. Snyder 
C. Engle 
C. Mummert 
S. C. Wagner 
R. G. Mummert 
R. G. Snyder 
L. G. LeFevre 



MISS HILDA HESS 

In the annual election for May 
Queen held Tuesday morning in chap- 
el, Miss Hilda Hess of Waynesboro, 
Pa. was chosen by the student body 
as the Queen of this year's pageant. 
Miss Leah Miller, of Allentown, Pa., 
was elected Maid of Honor to the 
Queen. Both girls have been prom 
inent in the activities of the campus 
during their four years at Lebanon 
Valley, Miss Hess as a student in 
the Conservatory of Music and Miss 
Miller as a major in the Department 
of History. 

At the same time, the attendants 
of the Queen, were chosen from a- 
mong the senior girls. The six girls 
elected to these positions are: Ruth 
Cooper, Dorothy Heister, Mary 
McCurdy, Bernita Strebig, Josephine 
Yake, and Olive Weigel. 

O 



I COLLEGE CALENDAR 



Next Monday evening at 8 P. M, 
Mr. James Caleb Sawders, lecturer 
and war time correspondent, will 
deliver an address in the chapel on 
"The Wonderland of Mexico". 

Mr. Sawders spent some time in 
Mexico, Nicaragua and other South 
American countries and during his 
stay in the former place he made a 
study of the people and country. He 
presents 100 colored slides and over 
2000 feet of motion pictures which 
will show the customs, industries and 
living conditions of these people who 
are our next door neighbors. Their 
methods of love making promises to 
be very interesting. 

The admission charge will be onl> 
25c. No seats will be reserved. Tick 
ets can be procured from any mem- 
ber of the Star Course Committee or 
at Grimm's Book Store. 

Mr. Sawders has been secured 
through the efforts of the Star 
Course Committee as an addition to 
the regular program for the year 
which was recently closed by the 
Filipino Collegians. 

O — 



MOYER SPEAKS TO 
COMMERCE CLU 



BUSINESS STUDENTS 
DINE AT 
PENNWAY 



SENIORS STRENGTHEN 
HOLD ON TITLE 



DEFEAT SECOND 
YEAR GIRLS 
30-23 





4 

000 
000 
000 
000 
000 
000 

23 



Freshman 
R. F. Wagner 
L. F. Levanture 
C. Forry 
S. C Boyer 
S. C. Franklin 
R. G. Franklin 
R G. Coble 
L. G. Fauth 

Referee — Cochran 
Umpire— Armacost 



G L T 

5 3 13 

000 
000 
000 
000 
000 
000 
000 

13 



Friday, April 4 — Literary Socie 

ties' Meeting. 
Saturday, April 5— Kalozetean 

Banquet; Kalozetean Annivers 

ary. 

Sunday, April 6— Y. M. and Y 

W. Meeting. 
Monday, April 7— Star Course 

lecturer on Mexico. 
Tuesday, April 8 — Girls Inter 

class basket-ball; Seniors vs 

Freshmen. 

Student recital in Engle Con 

servatory. 
Wednesday, April 9— Eurydice Con- 
cert home; French Club Meet 

ing. 

Thursday, April 10 — Girls Inret 
class basket-ball, Juniors vs 
Sophomores; Glee Club at My- 
erstown. 



Continuing their winning streak 
the Senior girls came out victorious 
over the sophomoreteam Tuesday af- 
ternoon, April 1, in the Alumni gym 
nasium with the score of 30-23 

The sophomore started the game 
with a "bang", rolling in two bas 
kets before the game had been in pro- 
gress two minutes. But the seniors 
soon showed their colors and began 
to score with the result that the 
score stood 8-6, in favor of the sen 
iors, at the end of the first quarter 
Both teams came back "strong" in 
the second quarter. Knaub, for the 
seniors, kept up her pace in putting 
the ball in as did Sheffler for .the 
Sophs. The score at the end of the 
half was 15-13, the seniors leading. 

In the scond half of the game the 
seniors played a harder game than 
they had played the first part of the 
scrimmage. Weigel and Keener in 
the center kept their forwards con- 
tinually supplied! with the ball while 
Knaub made good her shots. They 
continued their, scoring and made a 
rush of baskets in the last few min 
utes. The final score was 30-23, 
with the fourth-year girls in the 
lead. 

This victory brings the champion 
ship little nearer for the seniors as 
they have already defeated the jun 
iors and have but one game to play 
that with the Freshmen girls, next 
Tuesday afternoon. 



L. V. C's. newly organized com- 
merce club held its first dinner away 
from the college commons on Mon- 
day evening March 31. The dinner 
was served at the Pennway Hotel 
where everyone present enjoyed the 
excellent food and splendid program. 

The speakers of the evening was 
the Hon. Gabriel Moyer of Lebanon. 
Mr. Moyer is a lawyer by profession, 
a born speaker and a humorist by 
choice. He was formerly National 
President of the P. O. L. of A. and 
has experienced on active and check- 
ered career. Dynamic, powerful and 
humerous; it took little effort on the 
part of the club to listen to him. 

Mr. Moyer's talk was entirely ex- 
temporaneous. He praised the busi- 
ness ability of the Pennsylvania 
Dutch, taking in the entire company 
with a broad sweep of his hand, 
which terminated it's arc by resting 
upon Prof. Gingrich. This action 
was heartly applauded by the club. 
He then gave the Canadian Scotch 
their due. 

Mr. Moyer stressed the importance 
of the fundamental principal of bus- 
iness. He gave the club the "Open 
Sesame" to success, "Industry and 
Application. No man ever failed in 
life who was in dead earnest to suc- 
ceed. Life is truly a survival of the 
test. A real man is like a gum-ball- 
the harder you throw him down; the 
higher he will bounce. Let us not 
delude ourselves into false sense of 
security. Don't let ancestry or tra- 
dition engulf us. Let us walk the path 
of honor and honor will be ours." 

Mr. Moyer concluded his talk by 
telling the story of the man whose 
hair was getting thin on top and — 
well, if you want to hear about it, 
just ask any member of Lebanon Val- 
ley's Commerce Club. 



— O- 



ENSMINGER HEADS 
NEW Y. W. CABINET 



The success of next year's Y. W. 
C. A. campus activities wil be in 
charge of Sarah Ensminger, who was 
elected president at the resent As- 
sociation Meeting. Those elected to 
fill the other offces are: Dorothy 
Garber, Vice President; Mary Stager, 
Recording Secretary; Elizabeth Flook, 
Corresponding Secretary; Eulalie 
Morton, Pianist; Henrietta Wagner, 
Treasurer; and Anne Augusta Espen- 
shade, day student representative. 

The faculty advisors elected are: 
Madame Green, Mrs. Wallace, and 
Miss Johnston. 

The appointments made bby the 
President are: Marie Gelwicks, Pro- 
gram; Edieth Fields, Interest group; 
Eizabeth Ulrich, World Fellowship; 
Mary Buffington, Devotional; Naomi 
Shively, Custodian of Properties;. 
Ruth Shroyer, Social; and Ruth Co- 
ble, Freshman Commission. 



t&fVGE TWO 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, APRIL 3, 1930. 



ESTABLISHED 1926 



A weekly publication by the Under- 
graduate Students of Lebanon 
Valley College 



EDITORIAL STAFF 

Russel Etter, '31 Editor-in-Chief 

Ruth Liller, '31 Associate Edito 

R. Roudabush, '31 .... Associate Edito 
R .Morgan, '31 .... Managing Editor 



JtEFOKTOUIAL STAFF 

Robert Eshleman, '31 

Madeline Sheddy, '31 

Ruth Shroyer, '32 

Hilda Buckley, '32 

Walter Krumbeigel, '33 

General Reporters 

Mary Goshert, '32 Conservatory 

Robert Rawhouser, '32 Athletics 

Dorothy Garber, '32 Clionian 

Mary Epply, '32 Delphian 

Percy Clements, '33 Kalozetean 

Fred Mund, '32 Philokosmian 

Edna Early, '31 .... Alumni Reporter 



BUSINESS STAFF 

G. Becker, '31 .... Business Manager 

P. Keene, '32 Asst. Business Manager 

C. Wise, '31 .... Circulation Manager 



FACULTY ADVISORS 

Dr. Paul A. W. Wallace, English Dept. 

Miss Mary K. Wallace, English Dept 

Dr. Paul S. Wagner, Math. Dept. 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, a member 
of the Intercollegiate Newspaper Asso- 
ciation of the Middle Atlantic States. 



Single Copies 10 cents 

Subscription $1.50 per year 

Entered at the Annville, Pa., post- 
office as second class matter under the 
Act of March 3, 1879. 



WANTED— SOME SENSE! 



"Line upon line; precept upon pre 
cept. Here a little, and there a lit 
tie," said the old propret in describing 
the methods necessary for teaching 
his generation. Did he know what 
he was talking about? We'll say he 
did! And he was modern, too, dis 
tinctly modern. He could come right 
back to earth in 1930 and discover at 
Lebanon Valley College a handful oi 
men (we almost used a far different 
term) who have been told time after 
time about a few things, but who, in 
spite of it all, need to be taken in 
hand like the naughty four-year-old 
and 1 told, "Now Johnny, I don't want 
to tell you again not to — etc., etc." 

"Quite seriously, you fellows (and 
please don't think we're talking to the 
Freshmen exclusively), what is the 
sense of making a joke out of every 
program presented in Chapel with 
out the least regard for the difference 
between things sacred and things pro 
fane? Where is there any manhood 
in giving way to a burst of raucous 
laughter every time there is the 
slightest "hitch" in so serious and 
supposed'-to-be impressive an affair 
as the installation of the "Y" Cabi 
nets? Is your "funny-bone" so sensi 
tive that everything from a page of 
College Humor to a religious service 
stirs it to irresistible activity? 

We faintly recollect having heard 
of an animal with a rather infericr 
intelligence which acts in somewhat 
the same manner; the State provides 
certain institutions for humans who 
suffer from these propensities. But 
how under the Sun a handful of such 
patients can have escaped and round 
their way into an institution of learn- 
ing is more than we can figure out. 

We modestly suggest that the De- 
partment of Psychology devise some 
mental test or the Department oi 
Biology propose some operation that 
may eliminate or subdue these suffer- 
ers, so that a serious program may 
be given without being ruined by a 
lot of silly giggling and utterly un- 
called-for half-suppressed laughter. 
Until they are in a position to submit 
their proposals, we suggest that the 
victims of the mania poke their 
heads into a funnel or some other re- 
ceptacle of suitable size and "laugh 



it off" for about five minutes every 
morning before Chapel. 
And that's that! 

O 



ETIQUETTE 



Back in the days of Daniel Boone 
anyone who dared to talk about fine 
manners except in a satirical vein 
was promptly invited to take an ex 
tended leave of absence from the im 
mediate vicinity. The rough and 
ready pioneer was busy blazing trails 
through the wilderness, opening up 
vast tracts of virgin land, and ex 
tending the dominion of man over 
the territory that was later to be 
occupied by the most prosperous na 
tion in the world. The business man 
was also busy opening up new mar 
kets and expanding the commercial 
and industrial enterprises of the in- 
fant democracy. There was no time 
for considering so non-essential a 
matter as etiquette, no time, in fact, 
for anything but hard work in one 
form or another. For decades these 
conditions obtained for all except a 
very small minority of the American 
people. 

The introduction of the machine 
age has radically changed the situa 
tion. The average man of today has 
at his. disposal more leisure time than 
many of the most well-to-do of Colon- 
ial days. In consequence we are com 
ing to realize more and more the 
value of good breeding and to demand 
it is one of the requisites for success 
in many occupations. 

Let it be understood that we do not 
champion the cause of the pseudo 
etiquette so prevalent among the so- 
caiied "elite." We detest cant, hy- 
pocrisy, affectation and unnatural- 
ness, nor does calling any of these 
"good breeding" make them any 
less odious to us. We sicken at the 
sight of the monocled dude, all trick 
ed out with the regulation "cut 
away," spats, cravat and other seen 
ery; we feel like thoroughly ducking 
any one who affectedly drawls out his 
"rawthers" and rolls his r's, "don't 
you know?" Be natural, for heaven's 
sake, or dont be anything at all! 

But after all, the man who gets 
somewhere these days is the man 
who knows just what to do while in 
the company of others. He knows 
when to speak and what to say, when 
to keep silence and how to do it. He 
doesn't become muddled or confused, 
he maintains a certain poise in the 
presence of others that commands re 
spect and admiration. Why? Be- 
cause he has so mastered the art of 
associating with others that instead 
of being self-conscious he can forget 
details and allow his natural flow of 
conversation and' grace of manner 
full play. 

Seniors in search of positions soon 
become aware of the importance of 
these attainments. The finest dia- 
mnds in the rough will scarcely be 
detected except by the expert; man 
are too busy to probe fully into a 
man's qualications. First impressions 
are frequently deep impressions. 

Realizing the need of some sort of 
guidance along this line, someone has 
suggested that a course in etiquette 
be offered at Lebanon Valley. If a 
sufficient demand is evident, there is 
a probability of such a course being 
included in the curriculum in the fu- 
ture. Think it over and be prepared 
to voice your sentiment when called 
upon to do so. 



There was great confusion recent- 
ly in a sorority house in Ohio State 
University where a case of smallpox 
was reported. Doctors were kept 
quite rushed by the scores of stu- 
dents and townspeople who crowded 
the vestibule waiting to be revacci- 
nated. The unfortunate victim finally 
recovered — but in the meantime, the 
supply of vaccine had been exhaust- 
ed! 



FROSH THOUGHTS 



In last week's issue we released 
a sample of the weighty cogitations 
of the Freshmen as they find expres- 
sions in English 16 themes. The se- 
lection entitled "Spring Fever" was 
the product of the trusty pen of Ed- 
gar Brinser, a Frosh day-student. 
This week we present William Barnes' 
dissertation. 

ON EGGS 



When we stop to meditate on the 
characteristics and idiosyncrasies of 
the edible egg produced by chick- 
ens, we have a subject of vital inter- 
est to the blase person who arises, 
gulps, and goes. I have been in- 
formed that eggs can be prepared by 
culinary experts in more than one 
hundred and fifty ways. It is prob- 
ably true that some of the results 
obtained are hardly recognizable but 
at the same time they are extremely 
tasty. 

All of this leads to the conclusion 
that we ought to be more consider- 
ate of newly-laid eggs. What aw- 
ful creatures we must appear in the 
eyes of a helpless hen that is forever- 
trying to attain an end, and is for- 
ever thwarted with victory in sight 
when the product of her expectation 
is stolen! We assume a shameful 
attitude when we forcibly take a lit- 
tle egg from its haven of comfort. 

Eggs are such brittle things! They 
have absolutely no protection until 
they are hatched and then they can 
do nothing except create a clamor. 
We must consider the feelings of an 
egg when taken rudely and none too 
gently from the nest to have its shell 
cracked, and suddenly find itself hop- 
ping here and there on an infernally 
hot frying pan. To me, thebreaking 
of a raw egg is a great injustice. Not 
that the sight of the viscous, run- 
ning albumen adhering to the golden 
richness of the yolk is repulsive but 
that the person committing the deed 
didn't give the egg a "break". 

Hens have the power to lay foi 
only a short time and we must pause 
to admire the agressiveness and for 
tnude they exhibit during their lives. 
Many a casual diner becomes sudden- 
ly noisily demonstrative and irate 
upon opening an addled egg, and 
justly so; but does he stop to consider 
the plight of the unfortunate hen- 
born to be denied — that is doing hei 
best against extreme odds to satisfy 
him and usually strikes a favorable 
percentage of good eggs? 

It would be advisable to create a 
"Hen Foundation" for the social bet- 
terment and elevation of their stan- 
dards. Perhaps such an institution 
would be more useful than some oi 
the existing ones that are deviating 
from their originally intended pur- 
poses to berate a worthy proposition. 



STAR COURSE CHOSEN 

FOR NEXT YEAR 




ELWOOD WILLIAM MEYERS 



A scholar, gentleman and lover. A 
man devoted to erudition but one 
who will not allow it to creep in and 
absorb that which we determine as 
pleasant. He seeks to strike the 
"happy medium" by balancies pleas- 
ure and work. A lover truly. He 
may oft be seen swingin' down the 
lane, i.e. to the P. 0. to procure the 
Library's mail. 

He spends a considerable portion 
of his time in chemistry laboratory^ 
and is said to be a very good night 
worker No doubt his zeal and love 
for chemistry, in which he is majoK.- 
ing, prompts these late hours. 

Lately Alex has not been engaged 
in any outside activities but during 
his under classman days he partici- 
pated in tthe Tug-o-War, Football 
and belonged to the Rifle club. 

Elwood is always well dressed 

Prefers Camels Carries hod in 

Summer Hails from Dallas- 
town Belongs to the Philokos- 
mian Literary Society Is inter- 
ested in South Hall Receives 

Philadelphia phone, calls and sleeps 
soundly. Das all. 



Wednesd&y afternoon, March 26 
the new Star Course Committee met 
with the representative of the k 
Path Bureau and contracted for tin 
four numbers, as in former year? 
The first is "The Violin Maker of 
:ourse of next year. It consists 
Cremona, a Francois Coppee Com- 
edy-drama, set to beautiful music. 
The latter half of this number is giv- 
en over to a male quartette. The sec- 
ond is a play entitled "Her Husband's 
Wife", a comedy of domestic life. 
The third number will be either Mar- 
done the magician; or Backewitz, the 
dramatic cartoonist, and the fourth, 
"The Cathedral Trumpeters" and 
Fern Casford. With these four num- 
bers, there is no doubt that the ed- 
ucational and entertaining merits of 
former presentations will be upheld. 



STAFF CLOSES 

"QUITTIE" DRIVE 



MILDRED HARRISON SAYLOR 



We often wondered where the song, 
writers who wrote those "Sally" 
songs got their inspirations. But now 
we know. We too have met Sally. 

Mildred or, as she's better known 
Sally, is; a very charming "Miss." 
Though she spends entirely too much 
time with the books, her only weak- 
ess if it is one, she remains the in- 
curable optimist. 

One would naturally think that she 
would be interested in the Arts, but 
nay! She has chosen Biology, which 
carries the rather repugnant connota- 
tion of newts and frogs, as her 
major. 

Sally comes from York, belongs to 
the Clionian Literary Society, warbled 
with the Eurydice Choral Club her 
first and second years, played basket- 
ball last year for her class and will 
probably be teaching next year. 

Before we "hushup," tribute must 
be paid to one of Sally's accomplish- 
ments that is a delight to all of the 
male species interested in dancing, 
and that is Miss Saylor's proficiency 
in the same. She am a schwell shuf- 
fler! And how! 



INFORMAL DEBATE 

WITH ALBRIGHT 



This being the final week of the 
Sales Campaign, the Quittie staff has 
put forth extra effort to bring mat- 
ters to a close. Only a few students 
have not yet signed up for a year 
book. Although the student body has 
not subscribed one hundred per cent, 
the support in general has been ex- 
cellent, and' the staff is appreciative 
of the splendid cooperation. 

Efforts are being made to deliver 
the books in the very near future. 
Because of uncertainty as to the time 
of their arrival, however, the staff 
cannot at present specify a definity 
date. 

O 



KIETH VAUDEVILLE 

STAR ENTERTAINS 



As a fitting climax to a successful 
Quittie Sales Campaign, Sales Man- 
ager Becker arranged a unique pro- 
gram for last Friday morning. Mr. 
Shelldon Ed!garfa>n, of the Keith 
Vaudeville Circuit entertained on 
the banjo. As this performance was 
rendered as a special favor to the 
^s;/aff, the manager wishes to take 
this opportunity of thanking our 
friend "Shelly" for his kindness. The 
numbers were carefully varied and 
greatly appreciated! by everyone. 
"Fuzzy" Jacks accompanied Mr. Ed- 
garton on the piano. 

O 

IS IT JUSTIFIABLE? 



At the University of Michigan, 
students have been found working 
their way through school by boot- 
legging—evidently believing that the 
end justifies the means. 



The debate between the Affirmative 
team of Lebanon Valley and the Neg- 
ative of Albright college on the Kel- 
logg peace pact question, scheduled 
for Monday night turned out to be 
a very informal affair, due to mis- 
management on Albright's part. 

The debate was held in Emanuel 
Evangelical Church, at Reading- 
Gladys Knaub and Ruth Shroyer gave 
their constructive speeches for Leb- 
anon Valley while Hilda Hess re- 
butted. Being informal, there were 
no judges for the occasion. 

O 

A German Club has been organ- 
ized on the campus which consists 
the students of German 16 and 36 to 
further the interests in that la 11 ' 
guage. For the past few years, d ue 
to the World War, the German lan- 
guage has been viewed with an a nl 
mosity certainly not due the language 
of Goethe and Schiller. And it is 
give a beautiful language the recog 
nition it deserves that the club has 



to 



been organized. 



the 



The first meeting was held m 
"Ad" Building, Wednesday after- 
noon at 3:30. Elections were he 
with the following results: Preside ' 
Ethel Hower; Vice-President, Man 



Paris; Secretary-Treasurer, Aug uS , 
Trachte; Critics, Ebanshade 
Gockly. 



In the U. S. there are 220 GoV * J 
ment Indian Schools and apP r 
mately 575 elementary teachers. 



LA VIE COLLEGtENNE, THURSDAY, APRIL 3, 1930. 



PAGE THREE 



1 
J 



ng- 
lly" 
ww 

ly. 

wn, 

3S." 

uch 
;ak- 
in- 

she 
but 
lich 
ata- 
her 

3 to 

aled 
her 
ket- 
will 

lust 
ish- 
the 
ing, 
sncy 
nuf- 



HT 

,tive 
feg- 
ECel- 
lled 
, be 
tris- 

luel 
ling- 
fave 
^eb- 
re- 
rere 



ran- 
;S of 
6 to 
lan- 
due 
lan- 
ani- 
nage 
is to 
cog- 
has 

the 
•ter- 
held' 
lent; 
lary 
■usta 
and 



'ern- 





"A COLLEGE JOKE T O CURE THE 'BLUES' " 

— Jonathan Swift. 



Miss Fencil stepping off fifty yards. 
Billie — Those are not *y ar d steps.' 
Gloria — No, they're 'footsteps.' 

—LVC— 

Abe — Dot hot iss nize fit, aindt ? 

Skee — Yes, but suppose that my ears get tired! 

— LVC— 

Knoll — Why is Saylor here in Lab ? 

Jacks — Because he's too lazy to hunt up a comfortable place to loaf. 

—LVC— 

Elva — This scarf and I have one thing in common, we've both been draped 
around Ken's neck. 

— LVC— 



Famous comebacks: 

The Australian boomerang. 
Bad checks. 
Runaway children. 
The rent collector. 
Exam time. 
Pangs of conscience. 
Blue Monday. 
Xmas and Easter. 

Where's Barney? 
He's out. 
Where's Clem? 
He's at South Hall too. 



Non-combacks: 

Borrowed books. 
Loaned money. 
A roommate's tie. 
A broken date. 
Deserted at the altar. 
Wasted hours. 
That moonlight night! 
DREAMS! ! ! ! 
— LVC— 



PHILO-DELPHIAN 

JOINT SESSION 



— LVC— 

Take a Scotch tip — Stay at home and let your mind wander. 

— LVC— 

That candy in the window makes my mouth water. 
Well, here's a blotter. 

— LVC— 

Our advice to shiny-nosed girls — If you want to be a 'big- shot', use lots 
of powder. 

—LVC— 

Cop — Say didn't you see that red light? 
Alma — Yes, but I didn't see you. 

— LVC— 

Garrulous Female — Joe treats me with a sort of half aloofness. 
Also Feminine — well, half aloof is better than none! 

— LVC— 

See that man staggering. He must be drunk. 
No, he's just syncopated. 
What do you mean syncopated ? 
He's moving unevenly from bar to bar. 

— LVC— 

Lid you ever stop to think what might have happened to American his- 
tor y if the British soldiers at Bunker Hill had had bloodshot eyes ? 

— LVC— 

Ike— What are you reading? 

Bob — All about a wild night on the moors. 

Ike— Thomas Hardy, huh? 

Bob— No, CONQUEST OF GRANADA. 

— LVC— 

You Noah? 

Yes, and she's always been a Jonah to me. 

—LVC— 

What did you do with your hyena hide ? 
I turned it in on a gnu one. 

— LVC— 
. ? ? ? — oh, you big handsome brute! 
Babe Early — Now, honey, you know I'm no brute. 

ft* — LVC— 
RELIEVE IT OR NOT— 

Anne Kiehl day dreams 'a haute voix.' 

Dawg-gone was put to it this week as the roommate lost the College 

Th e cat said, 'Where have you been all my lives?' 

Beatie thinks that 'Knaub' is something to 'adore.' 
„. Jt is being rumored that 'Scotty' McCusker was observed smoking a 2oc 
u gar. 

The new Oswego song is 'Oswego marching on.' 
Modern f rat house furniture becomes antique before it is paid for. 
p^^Parasite is a person who goes through a revolving door without 



The Philokosmian and Delphian 
Literary Societies held a joint ses- 
sion on Friday evening, March 28. 
Members of both the student body 
and faculty enjoyed the program that 
was rendered. The meeting was 
opened with devotional exercises con- 
ducted by Edgar Hertzler, acting 
chaplain. After reading a portion of 
Scripture from 1 Cor. 13, he offered 
prayer. Clarence P. Baimhart, pres- 
ident of Philo, then gave a talk in 
which he warmly welcomed the Del- 
phian Literary Society to the halls 
of Philo, and he also urged all so- 
ciety members and ! friends to enjoy 
the evening's entertainment. 

The first item on the program was 
a special number, entitled, "The 
Octopus", which proved a real thrill- 
er" of an April Fool joke. The cred- 
it for giving this surprise belongs 
to Henrietta Wagner, John Hughes, 
Paul Evancoe, Augusta Trachte, and 
Amos Knisley. The program was 
continued by Amos Knisley,, who ren- 
dered a selection on the shoe horn. 
The skill and cleaverness which he 
showed in playing this instrument 
earned for him resounding applause 
from the appreciative audience. 

A real treat was next given by a 
mixed' octette made up of Marian 
Kruger, Dorothy Heister, Dorothy 
Haefer, Margaret Young, C. Oscar 
Goodman, Edgar Hertzler, Paul 
Keene, and Luther Rearick. The 
octette admirably rendered three 
popular selections, namely, "Happy 
Days", "The Desert Song", and 
'Should I". Following this, in a num- 
ber entitled, "Serious", Francis Barr 
and Dorothy Forrey gave a real ex- 
hibition of concentration. They proved 
that "things are not what they seem", 
and that things that look serious aet 
first do not always remain so. 

Caroline Fisher gave the program 
a new turn when she gave a talk on 
"The Origin of the Easter Custom". 
In her delightful and interesting 
way she showed the sources of the 
present-day Easter custom. This 
number was instructive as well as 
entertaining. A pantomime, "The 
'Light Went Out", was then put on. 
It proved a real "hit". Miss Eva 
Peck with her usual good talent act- 
ed as reader, while the cast depicted 
the text as read. Kenneth Waughtel, 
who is a very good female imper- 
sonator, took the part of the beauti- 
ful girl. Woodrow Dellinger, as the 
mother, shower considerable talent 
and skill. The hero of the plot was 
Charles Wise, and his rival, the vil- 
lain, was Amos Knisley. The audience 
being now "pepped up" for some- 
thing weighty, was favored with a 
"Heavy Number", in which dough 
nuts played a prominent part. 

O 

KAPPA LAMBDA NU 



the latter doing the greater part of 
the talking. 

Mary Stager read a poem contain- 
ing a moral which dealt with Pro- 
hibition. This poem had been writ- 
ten by Clio's Vice-President, Marga- 
ret Smyser. 

After a delightful vocal solo. 
"Your Song from Paradise", by 
Helen Hain, Kathryn Lutz supplied 
the humor of the evening which con- 
sisted in witty remarks about vari- 
ous members of the society. 

As a climax to the program, Mar- 
garet Paris told interesting tales 
about the celebration of holidays in 
Sweden and Germany, as she wit- 
nessed them before coming to Amer- 
ica. The Clio girls are always eagei 
to hear Margaret tell of her experi- 
ences, and they found her address on 
Friday night exceptionally interest- 
ing. 

O 

KAPPA LAMBDA SIGMA 



The Kalozetean Literary Society 
dispensed with the regular literary 
program last Friday evening and 
held a short business meeting prior 
to Philo-Delphian joint-session. Offi- 
cers for the remainder of the year 
were elected with the exception of 
th president who had already been 
chosen. Kenneth Russel was elected 
vice-president; Charles Salek, record- 
ing secretary and Alvin Kinney as 
corresponding secretary. Ralph Cole- 
man will act as pianist, Russel Mor- 
gan as critic, and Roudabush as chap- 
lain. Walter 0. Krumbeigel will 
handle the duties of sergeant-at- 
arms, his able assistant being Walter 
Donmoyer. Final plans for the anni- 
versary were discussed and many 
helpful last-minute suggestions were 
offered. 



At a business meeting of the Cli- 
onian Literary Society on Friday 
night, the following officers were 
elected for the last term: President, 
Esther Angstadt; Vice-President 
Anne Gordon; Treasurer, Alcesta 
Slichter; Recording Secretary, Dol- 
ores Gregory; Corresponding Secre- 
tary, Ann Kiehl; Chaplain, Naomi 
Shively; Pianist, Kathryn Lutz; 
Critic, Helen Hain. 

The devotions, led by the chaplain 
Meredith Rice, possessed a tone of 
sincerity and were both helpful and 
inspiring. The theme, "Life is 
Growth," brought out the idea that 
one exists not merely for one's own 
pleasure and happiness, but for the 
benefit of others. 

Josephine Yake, in her unique 
manner, related a horror story, en 
titled "Capitol Fun". The scene was 
laid at Washington in the House of 
Representatives. The theme was liq 
uor and its various representative 
as discussed by the drys and wets— 



PHILO ANNOUNCES 

PLAY CAST 



The cast for the play, "Seven Keys 
To Baldpate", has been chosen. Dr. 
Paul A. W. Wallace, who has so suc- 
cessfully directed "The Private Sec- 
retary", "Saint Joan", and many 
other student enterprises, is now 
coaching the cast at regular rehear- 
sals. The leading part has been as- 
signed to J. Calvin Keene, who has 
been prominent in student produc- 
tions for some time, having played in 
"The Truth", "Saint Joan", and other 
plays. The quality of the play is fur- 
ther enhanced by the fact that seven 
more of the characters acted in 
"Saint Joan", the Philo play of last 
year. They are Luther Rearick, Earl 
Wolf, John Snyder, Glenn E. Bendigo, 
C. Paul Barnhart, Jacob Taylor, and 
Edgar Hertzler. Robert Eshleman, 
who is highly esteemed for his act- 
ing in "The Private Secretary", is 
also one of the cast. Female characters 
in the play are being taken by Ruth 
Liller, Ruth Shroyer, Eva Peck and 
Anne Gohn. 

This play, which will be given on 
May 2, at the sixty-third Philokos- 
mian anniversary, is a melodramatic 
farce in a prologne, two act, is an 
epilogue. The production is some- 
thing different from the ordinary run 
of plays at L. V. C, inasmuch as it 
is a fine example of the American 
mystery play. "Seven Keys To Bald- 
pate" has proved itself an outstand- 
ing dramatic success where ever 
played, and expert coaching combined 
with a star cast promises an excep- 
tional treat for lovers of dramatics 
at L. V. C. Last Wednesday the en- 
tire cast, with the exception of two 
members, saw the play at Harris- 
burg, in company with Dr. Wallace 



E. J. SNAVELY AND COMPANY 

UMBRELLAS, LUGGAGE and SPORTING GOODS 
ATHLETIC EQUIPMENT 
628 Cumberland St. 
LEBANON. PENNA. 



I 



FOR ADVANCE COAT OR DRESS 
DON'T FAIL TO VISIT 

ROSE SINGER SHOP 

761 CUMBERLAND ST. LEBANON, PA. 



V. 

.'. 
y. 

x 

H 

| 



PARKER FOUNTAIN PENS 

GUARANTEE D FOR LIFE 

Two Pens in One— A Desk Pen and a Pocket Pen. 
Ask To See Them. 

ESBENSHADE'S BOOK STORE 

38 N. 8th St. -:- -:- Lebanon, Pa. 



CLOTHING OF QUALITY 

J S BASEHORE 

Lebanon, Pa. 



—Shaeffer's Lifetime Pens — 

NONE BETTER ABSOLUTELY GUARANTEED 

AN EVERYDAY NECESSITY FOR 
COLLEGE STUDENTS 

T T * -r-* n p y j The Gift Store of Lebanon 

HARlEL O 757-759 Cumberland Street 



PA&E FOUR 



APRIL 3, 1930. 



PLANTING PLAN FOR 

CAMPUS APPROVED 



(Continued from Page 1) 



Gress, State Botanist of Pennsylva- 
nia, Mr. James R. McConaghie, 
Landscape Architect of Pennsylvania 
and Mr. Harold Caparn, Landscape 
Architect of the Brooklyn Botanic 
Garden, New York. 

"In addition to the information ob- 
tained from the afore mentioned 
sources the publications of leading 
horticulturists such as L. H. Bailey 
of Cornell, Alfred Render and Ste- 
phen F. Hamblin of Harvard, Joseph 
S. Hick, Forrester of Pennsylvania, 
were secured and studied with great 
care and selections made of such ma- 
terial as was best adapted to local 
climatic and soil conditions. 

"Prof. Grimm prepared a survey lo- 
cating buildings, walks and trees. 

"Mr. Harold A. Caparn, Landscape 
Architect of the Brooklyn Botanic 
Gordens, was employed at a cost of 
$500 to do the landscape work and 
prepare blueprints of the planting 
plan, which may be seen by any one 
interested, in college office. 

"Mr. Caparn made two visits to 
Annville and spent considerable time 
with the committee in studying the 
conditions on the campus, worked 
over the data that had been assem- 
bled by the committee adding numer- 
ous contributions of his own and has 
prepared a planting scheme that 
when installed, will illustrate the 
general evolutionary relationship in 
the plant kingdom. 

"The report includes two small 
greenhouses, originally suggested by 
Dr. Gress and heartily approved bj 
all consulted, which if constructed, 
will not only add materially to the 
aesthetic features of the campus bui 
will enable the college to prepare stu- 
dents for a much wider range of pro- 
ductive usefulness than has been 
possible in the past and will greatly 
increase the range of experimental 
work in both Botany and Zoology. 

"The present planting of trees and 
shrubs on the campus numbers 208 
individuals, representing 19 families 
and 39 species. 

"A brief analysis of the recom- 
mendations of the plans is as follows: 

Evergreen Trees 12 species 

Deciduous trees 90 species 

Coniferous evergreen 

shrubs 13 species 

Broad leaf evergreen 

shrubs 18 species 

Deciduous shrubs 190 species 

Herbaceous plants 118 species 

New species to be plant- 
ed, total 441 species 

Old species already 

planted 39 species 

Total after plants rec- 

mended 480 species 



"In addition to the land plants, the 
plans include a pool for Algae, a pool 
for larger aquatics such as water 
lilies, a series of small pools for ex- 
perimental purposes and maintaining 
permanent cultures of both plants 
and animals for study. 

"As outstanding special features 
of the land planting we might men- 
tion the Rock Garden, west of the li- 
brary, the Fernary along the north 
andl west sides of the library, the 
vine-covered pergola surrounding the 
unsightly ash and refuse dump just 
outside the north hall door which Mr. 
Caparn and the committee strongly 
recommended be turned into a bower 
and its use as a dump be discontin- 
ued. The formal garden recommend- 
ed at the southwest corner of the 
campus is also intended to correct 
unsightly conditions in the rear of the 
men's dormitory. 

"The most costly single item in- 
cluded in the recommendations is the 
drive and approach to the rear of 
the men's dormitory. 

"The recommendations also sug- 



gest the relocation of a few of the 
walks so as to harmonize their loca- 
tion with other existing conditions. 

The committe offers the following 
recommendiations, relative to carry- 
ing out the plans, were also approved. 

1. That the construction of the pro- 
posed drive way and the relocation 
of walks be referred to the commit- 
tee on repairs. 

2. That a planting committee be 
appointed whose duties shall be:- 

(a) To exercise general control 
over all planting. 

(b) To issue or opprove all req- 
uisitions for planting and transmit 
them to the Agent of The Finance 
Committee. 

(c) To approve all bills for plant- 
ing before they are paid'. 

(d) To limit their requisitions to 
the funds in hand for planting pur- 
poses. 

3. That a gardner, skilled in prac- 
tical horticulture, be imployed to 
supervise all planting andl the exe- 
cution of the planting plans, as ap- 
proved by the Finance committee, to 
keep the plants and greenhouse in 
good condition and perform such 
other duties as the Finance commit- 
tee may direct. 

4. That nuserymen be invited! to 
examine the planting plans and sub- 
mit prices on |a) individual plants, 
(b) Installation of each, (c) Groups 
of plants, (d) Installation of each 
,group, and (e) Installation of the 
entire project. 

5. That nurserymen who install 
plants that are specific gifts or mem- 
orials be required to give written 
guarantee to replace any plant that 
they install that is not alive nd grow- 
ing the season following that of its 
installation. 

6. That Alumni and' others be se- 
licited for funds for the installation 
of individual plants or groups as 
memorials. 

7. That the Planting committee 
be authoried to purchase labels and 
markers for individual plants, groups, 
memorials etc, so as to make effective 
the plans as rapidly as they are in- 
stalled and that the gardner place 
these markers as directed by the com- 
mittee. 

8. That the planting committee be 
authorized to purchase labels for the 
plants already on the campus and 
that an appropriation not to exceed 
$100 be made for the same, and that 
these be placed before commence- 
ment, if possible. 

9. That appropriations from col- 
lege funds be made by the Finance 
Committee for the installation of the 
planting as rapidly as they deem ad- 
visable. 

10. That all funds for executing 
the planting plans be paid into the 
college treasury and paid out by the 
Agent of Finance Committee. 

Signed, S. H. Derickson, 

J. Walter Esbenshade, 
Planting Committee. 
O 




Mr. George H. Bachman of Leba- 
non, announces the marriage of his 
daughter, Susan, foreign missionary 
to Africa, to Rev. Mr. Ronald Kratz, 
of West Springs, Illinois. 

The ceremony was performed 
Wednesday, March 26, at 6:00 P. M. 
in the Salem United Brethren 
Church, by Rev. Harry Miller. The 
rostrum of the church was filled with 
palms, suggesting an African atmos- 
phere. Marion Light of the class of 
'16, L. V. C. presided at the organ. 
Music was rendered during the whole 
ceremony. The ring ceremony was 
used. The bride was attired in 
white. There were no attendants. 

Mr. and 1 Mrs. Kratz are residing 
in West Springs, Illinois, where Mr. 
Kratz is minister of the Baptist 
Church. 



OTTERBEIN TO 

PERMIT DANCING 



The latest news reaching us from 
Otterbien, states that the students 
of that school will have dances every 
Saturday night. This change came 
when one of the faculty stated that 
he thought the students should be 
given more chance to mingle to- 
gether. 

The library is to be converted into 
,a 'diance hall and sofas will be found 
in every dark corner. The members 
of the Life Work Recruits have' vol- 
enteered to serve refreshments at 
every dance. 

This is no doubt one of the great- 
est changes every made in a "mod- 
ern college. 

If anyone doubts this article's au- 
thenticity please ask someone to 
show you the April Fool edition of 
the Otterbein's Can and Tardinal. 
It's the cleverest publication we've 
seen for a long time. 



M. H. SMITH 

JEWELER 

Watches at Lowest Prices 
Watch and Clock Repairing 
38 Railroad St. Annville, Pa, 



Fine assortment of Watches, Rings, 

Chains, & etc. 
New Century Chiming Grandfather 
Clocks 

LIGHT'S JEWELRY STORE 
51 West Main St. 



PIANOS 

PLAYER PIANOS 

PLAYER ROLLS 
VICTOR RADIOS 

VICTROLAS 

VICTOR RECORDS 
SHEET MUSIC 



I Miller Music Store 

738 Cumberland Street 
Lebanon, Pa. 



RUSSEL and SPANGLER 

Our Agents At 
LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 
FINKELSTEIN 
Cleaners & Dyers 



PHOTOGRAPHS 

LIVE FOREVER 

Ulrich's Studio 

820 Cumberland St. 



PRINTING 




PUBLICATION. 
BOOKS, CATA- 
LOGUES, STATION- 
ERY, CARDS, TAGS, 
ETC. 

ANNYILLE PRINTING 
COMPANY 

ANNVILLE PA. 



HW MILLER 

HARDWARE 
OF QUALITY 



Annville 



Pa. 



PRINTING 

When you want work 
of the better kind see 

HIESTER— The Printer 



J. F BERLEW 
DEPARTMENT STORE 

Two Doors From Post Office 

Invites your inspection of 
General Merchandise 



ARTISTS SUPPLIES 

Canvas, Parchment, Japanese Tissue, 
Fabriano White and Grey Charcoal 
Papers, Whatman's Hot and Cold- 
pressed Papers, Oil, Water and 
Decora Colors, Brushes, Atomizers, 
China Palettes, Drawing Boards, Col- 
ored Crayons and Pencils. 

All high grade materials 

BOLLMANS 

33 South Eighth Street, 
Lebanon, Pa. 



D. L SAYLOR & SONS 

Contractors 

LUMBER AND COAL 



ANNVILLE. PA. 



For 

QUALITY PLUS 

in 

Material and Workmanship 
Repairs at Special Rates 
Go To 

ANNVILLE SHOEMAN 
207 W. Main 



TRY OUR HOME MADE 
SANDWICHES 

QUALITY LUNCH 

BREYER'S ICE CREAM 
A Specialty 

7 E. Main St. Annville, P a . 



For Quality 

Baked Products 

Patronize 

FINK'S BAKERY 

Main Street 



TENNIS SUPPLIES 

RACKETS AND TENNIS 
BALLS 

at Moderate Prices 
We restring your old Rackets 



GRIMMS 

COLLEGE BOOK STORE 



CHEFS 

HOUSE OF GOOD 
Winn 



Wm. Penn Highway 



Near Annville 



Meals Served at All Hours 
BANQUETS AND PARTIES 
Our Specialty 



KREAMER BROS. 



STEINITE RADIOS 
EASY ELECTRIC WASHER 
COLUMBIA GAS STOVES AND RANGES 
RUGS AND LINOLEUMS 

"House of Better Values" 
FURNITURE AND UNDERTAKING 

328 W. Main St. Phone 6R3 




WE'RE HAVING A GOOD RUN IN 

ESKIMO PIES 

TRY TO GET A "FAT BOY" 

THEPENNWAY 

OPPOSITE P. O. 
A FULL LINE OF FRESH PASTRY DAILY 



1 



TENNIS 
WITH BONEBRAKE 
FRIDAY, 2:30 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



CONGRATULATION 
TO THE EURYDICE 
CHORAL CLUB 



VOLUME VI 



ANNVILLE, PENNSY LVANIA, THURSDAY, APRIL 10, 1930. 



No. 5 



EURYDICE RENDERS 
BRILLIANT CONCERT 



TENNIS SCHEDULE 

IS COMPLETED 



LEHMAN ADDRESSES 

LIFE WORK RECRUITS 



ENTERTAINMENT A N I 
MUSICAL VALUE 
COMBINED 



The Eurydiee Choral Club of L. 
V gave it annual concert in the 
Engle Conservatory on Wednesday 
evening, April 9, at eight o'clock 

A group of three songs by the Club 
featured the opening of the program 
The first of these was the well-known 
and well-loved "Alma Mater" by Leh 
man Spessard, the second, "Epilogue" 
by H. C. Banks — an extremely at- 
mospheric selection containing sweet 
harmonies; the third a heavy and in 
terpretative number "Out Upon the 
Restless Sea", by W. H. Neillinger. 

By way of variety, Alcesta Slichter 
then rendered two delightful violin 
selections "Serenade" by G. Pierne, 
and "Valse Coquette" by C. C. White 
Miss Slichter displayed a depth of 
tone quality and brilliant technique. 

Another group of three songs was 
then rendered by the Club — the first 
an entrancing Russian melody, "Slum 
ber Song" by A. Gertchaninoff, fol- 
lowed 1 by two negro Spirituals "No 
body Knows de Trouble I've Seen" 
and "I Want to be Ready" by H. Bur 
leigh. 

Miss Olive Weigle, the pianist of 
the Club then captivated the audience 
with a brilliant piano number 
"Etude", by Leschizsky. 

Following Miss Weigle's selection 
The Club rendered their outstanding 
number of the evening "Pan", by D 
S. Smith. This selection was one of 
great difficulty and showed the re- 

i Continued on Page 4) 



The tennis season is scheduled to 
get underway Friday when L. V.'s 
team meets the tennis team of Bone- 
brake Seminary. This match should 
be especially interesting as Russel 
Oyer, a member of the Blue and 
White team last year, will play for 
Bonebrake. 

Prospects for a successful season 
are very bright. Only Eberly and 
Oyer are lost from last year's squad 
and some very promising new play- 
ers are on hand to fill any openings 
Among these are Donmoyer and Mil 
ler, two Lebanon boys. Donmoyer, a 
freshman this year, has a very high 
reputation and is expected to make 
a fine showing. Those of last year's 
men who are available are Shroyer 
Hertzler, Fink, and 1 John Rank. 

The next match after the one with 
Bonebrake will be the one with ~t. & 
M. at Lancaster on Wednesday, April 
23. F. & M. was the only team to de- 
feat us last year, and will probably 
be the strongest opponent this year 
Eleven matches are scheduled, five 
of them at home. Others May be 
added a little later. The schedule ai 
present is as follows: 
April 12 Bonebrake Theologi- 
cal Seminary At home 
April 23 F. & M. Away 
April 30 Albright At home 

May 6 Elizabethtown At home 
May 10 Dickinson Away 
May 14 Susquehanna At home 
May 17 Dickinson At home 

May 24 Susquehanna Away 
May 26 Moravian Away 
May 28 Albright Away 
May 29 Elizabethtown Away 



The Life Work Recruit group of 
the college held its regular meeting 
in North Hall parlor Thursday, April 
3. The program was opened by Harry 
Zechman who conducted devotions. 
Dr. Lehman of the Derry Street U. 
B. Church, Harrisburg, then ad- 
dressed the group. His talk was prac- 
tical and timely, dealing with the re- 
lations of the Christian to those 
about him, and especially with the 
attitude that those who have given 
themselves to definite Christian 
work should take. All were im- 
pressed with the sincerity and power 
of the speaker. After the talk, Dr. 
Lehman led a discussion in which 
questions concerning the active Chris- 
tian work were considered. After 
the customary circle of prayer, Dr. 
^Lehman dismissed the group with 
the benediction. 



EXCELLENT PROGRAM IS PROVIDED FOR 
FIFTYTHIRD ANNIVERSARY OF KALO 



UNIQUE DECORATING SCHEME ADDS TO TOUCH OF 
NOVELTY SUPPLIED BY THESE 
ONE-ACT PLAYS 



-O- 



INTER CLASS TITLE 
TAKEN BY SENIORS 



FOURTH YEAR GIRLS 
NOSE OUT 
FROSH 



-O- 





LIFE WORK RECRUITS 

ASSIST PASTOR 



ALUMNI ASSEMBLE 
AT KALO BANQUET 



On Sunday the LL c e Work Recruits 
^ade a trip to the Brunnerville U. 

Church, and assisted the pastor, 
Harry Zechman, in the morning and 
afternoon church services. Miss Ruth 
Cooper delivered the morning ser- 
m °n. Her topic was "Christ, the 
^an of Joy." The afternoon service 
centered about the dedication of new 
hv mn books for the church. The R 
Cr uits rendered the greater part of 
tfi e afternoon program. Harry Zech- 
man gave the invocation and the de- 
motions were conducted by S. Fred 
Cn ristman, who read Psalm 98 and 
offered prayer. 
Ruth Coble played appropriate selec- 
ts on the piano for solo and of- 
i.^atory. The Life Work Recruit 
Quartet composed' of S. Fred Christ- 
man > John Snyder, J .Calvin Keene, 
and Pa ul Keene sang three special 
^ections. Fred W. Mund delivered 
, . address of the service, using for 
s ^xt Neh. 42:12. After a short 
exercise the meeting was 



SPEAKERS POINT OUT 
NEED FOR GREATER 
COOPERATION 



edication e 

°sed by Paul Emenheiser who pro- 
ofed the benidiction. This was the 
* e cond of four scheduled visits to 
ea *"by churches by the Life Work 
Remits 



The Kalozetean Literary Society 
held its fourth annual Alumni ban- 
quet last Saturday afternoon at four 
o'clock at Chef's Place. It brought 
together Kalo's new and old who were 
given ample opportunity to discuss 
old times with former classmates. 

After a delightful meal the alumni 
were given a chance to speak on 
subjects of their own choice, which 
in every case turned out to be— Kalo 
Rev. D. E. Young acted as toast 
master and he will long be remem 
bered for his inspiring remarks sc 
cleverly mixed in with timely humor 
The first speaker well deserved hi 
place on the program. He was Mr 
W. F. Garman, the first president of 
the Kalozetean Literary Society. Al 
though well up in years Mr. Garman 
seemed full of "pep" and what he 
termed "Kalo spirit". He told of the 
society's progress down through the 
years and urged that the present ac 
tive Kalo's renew their somewhat lag- 
ging interest and' uphold the stan 

(Continued on Page Four) 



In the most closely-contested game 
of the basketball series, the Senior 
girls came out victorious over the 
Freshman quintette with the score 
of 23-21, Tuesday evening. 

From beginning to end, the game 
was one continuous battle, first one 
team leading by one or two points 
then the other. 

The frosh opened with a "bang" 
leading with a score of 8-3 at the end 
of the first quarter. The Seniors 
forged ahead in the second quarter 
and annexed eight points while the 
Freshman girls only succeeded in 
gaining three, making the score 11-11 
at the end of the half. 

In the first few minutes of the sec 
ond half, the frosh broke the tie. But 
the determined Seniors also kept 
sinking their shots, rolling up their 
score side by side with the Fresh 
en. 

In the last few minutes of play 
the score was a tie. One second be 
fore the final whistle, Keener made a 
spectacular shot; the ball "swished 
through the net and the game was 
won for the Seniors. 

The victory gives the title of 
girl's inter-class basketball cham 
.pions to the Seniors as they won 
both from the Juniors and the Soph 
omores in previous games. 



-O- 



DR. WALLACE ILL 



Dr. Paul A. W. Wallace head of 
the English Department has been 
granted a six weeks leave of absence 
He is at present recovering from an 
operation at the Good Samaritan 
hospital in Lebanon. Reports say that 
his condition is improving rapidly 

The faculty and student body are 
glad to hear that he is again regain 
ing his health. 



The Kalozetean Literary Society 
opened its Fifty-third Anniversary 
last Saturday evening with a well- 
balanced program successfully pre- 
sented in the chapel of the Engle 
Conservatory of Music. 

While the audience was gathering, 
several enjoyable musical numbers 
were rendered by the orchestra. De- 
votions were led by Rev. P. B. Gib- 
ble, D.D., of Palmyra, a loyal and 
still-active Kalo. The president's 
address was delivered by Mr. Edgar 
Shroyer. He welcomes Kalo's new 
and old and urged all to stand by 
their sreiety in whatever activity it 
indulged. A Kal quartette composed 
Of Messrs. Russel, Morgan, Kazlusky 
and Roudabush sang two very beauti- 
ful selections, "Waiting for the Sun- 
rise" and "Deep River." Another se- 
lection by the orchestra concluded the 
preliminary part of the program. 
The Play 
The three one act plays, which the 
society presented as the major fea- 
ture of its anniversary, have made a 
worthy contribution to the dramatic 
traditions of Kalo. Not only were 
the plays which were produced un- 
der the direction of Miss Mary Kath 
ryn Wallace, presented in an order 
which showed a keen evaluation oi 
audience reactions to drama, but 
these same plays, although each one 
was dissimilar in motive and type 
from the other two, formed a com 
bination that might well be called 
a trilogy interrelated by the single 
purpose of artistic entertainment. 

If Lord Dunsany were asked tc 
give a definite location for the scene 
of "The Glittering Gate", the first 
play of the evening, he would prob- 
ably state it to be "the Edge of the 
World". The stage setting, which 
employed the modernistic type of 
simplicity, created the proper idea of 
indefiniteness — somewhere on "the 
Edge of the World". In the ghastly 
blue shading from the footlights, a 
high, arched gate radiated an eerie 
gleam from the rear center of the 
stage, while the shadowy folds of the 
blue stage curtains increased the 
vagueness and mystery of the scene. 

The Irish playwright has securec 1 
the element of vastness by confining 
the action to two characters on a 
comparatively bare stage. Jim, ? 
bloke, hanged an uncertain number 
of years ago, is sitting outside the 
Glittering Gate uncorking bottles. 
Every bottle is empty, but Jim con- 
tinues openin™ them, hoping that 
sometime "the trick m?y fail" and he 
may find a drop to drink. There is 
neither past nor future here before 
the Glittering Gate, says Jim, and 
consequently no hope. Bill, another 
bloke and Jim's former protege in 
the art of safe-cracking, has just ar- 
rived at the Gate. He is hopeful of 
prying open the lock on the Glitter- 
ing Gate with the tools he ha? 
brought along from earth. Off stage 



is heard intermittently the piercing 
and fiendish laugh of Illusion as she 
mocks these dupes whom she has en- 
snai*ed. Bill opens the lock and down- 
at-the-mouth Jim becomes sufficient- 
ly interested to leave his pile of bot- 
tles and shuffle toward the Gate. 
They open the Gate. There, where 
they expected to find heaven, is the 
sky with its myriads of stars, and 
Illusion has saved her shrillest and 1 
most fiendish laugh for the moment. 

John Morris played the part of Jim 
with an attitude of dejection that 
contrasted sharply with the buoyancy 
that Frederick Rhoads put into the 
character of Bill. Both roles were 
so skillfully handled that the atmos- 
phere of unreality and the earthly 
lingo of the two blokes seemed at all 
times in harmony. 



From the pen of a native Pennsyl- 
vanian came the second play. 
"Thursday Evening" by Christopher 
Morley brought the audience back to 
their own locals. It presented a do- 
mestic scene with all the petty trials 
that make life humorous to an on- 
looker. This is a type of play which 
can easily become a farce if over- 
acted. However, Anna Kiehl and Ed- 
gar Shroyer, as Mr. and Mrs. Johns, 
and Eva Peck and Trula Koch, as 
their respective mothers, maintained 
a manner of naturalness on the stage 
throughout the episode. The cast 
showed worthy evidences of coopera- 
tion in presenting their art as a 
choice piece of humor. 

"Moonshine" by Arthur Hopkins 
was the finale of the evening's dra- 
matics. Although the play is simple 
in plot, it offers a splendid oppor- 
tunity for good acting. A revenue 
officer, who has been caught by a 
moonshiner, is brought to the latter's 
cabin to enjoy some refreshment be- 
fore he is dispatched to the Great 
Beyond. By a cunning play of wits, 
however, the revenue officer wins his 
freedom. 

William Speg, as the moonshiner, 
made his first stage appearance in 
this play. His characterization of this 
crude mountaineer was a notable 
achievement. Joseph Hutchinson, as 
the revenue officer, is to be com- 
mended for the steady improvement 
he has been showing in his roles. Al- 
though he has always justified him- 
self in dramatics here, this is un- 
doubtedly the best interpretation he 
has ever given. 

The Reseption 
Immediately after the close of the 
last play Kalo's guests were given a 
reception in tthe Alumni gymnasium. 
The decorations far surpassed any 
seen so far this year on the campus 
in elaborateness and cleverness of de- 
sign. Crepe paper bearing Kalo's 
colors was used along with Japanese 
lanterns, drapes and appropriate fur- 
niture necessary to give the gathering 

(Continued on Page Four) 



i 



PAGE TWO 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, APRIL 10, 1930. 



ESTABLISHED 1925 



A. waekly publication by the Under 
graduate Students of Lebanon 
Valley College 



EDITORIAL STATP 

Russel Etter, '31 Editor-in-Chie 

Ruth Liller, '31 Associate Edito 

R. Roudabush, '31 .... Associate Edito 
R .Morgan, '31 .... Managing Edito 



KSFOXTOIUAL ST AFP 

Robert Eshleman, '31 

Madeline Sheddy, '31 

Ruth Shroyer, '32 

Hilda Buckley, '32 

Walter Krumbeigel, '33 

General Reporter 

Mary Goshert, '32 Conservatory 

Robert Rawhouser, '32 Athletic 

Dorothy Garber, '32 CHonia 

Mary Epply, '32 Delphian 

Percy Clements, '33 Kalozetean 

Fred Mund, '32 Philokosmian 

Edna Early, '31 .... Alumni Reporter 



BUSINESS ST ATP 

G. Becker, '31 .... Business Manager 
P. Keene, '32 Asst. Business Manager 
C. Wise, '31 .... Circulation Manager 



FACULTY ADVISORS 

Dr. Paul A. W. Wallace, English Dept. 
Miss Mary K. Wallace, English Dept 
Dr. Paul S. Wagner, Math. Dept, 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE. a member 
of the Intercollegiate Newspaper Asso 
elation of the Middle Atlantic States. 



Single Copies IP cents 

Subscription $1.50 per year 

Entered at the Annville, Pa., post 
office as second class matter under the 
Act of March 3. 1879. 



HANGERS ON 



Institutions rarely die overnight 
Thay pass the peak of accomplish- 
ment slowly retrograde, and with 
gradually increasing momentum des- 
cend into decay and disuse. That this 
process of decay has started in the 
case of our Literary Societies is an 
accepted fact on the campus. That 
it can be arrested is not so readily 
granted; we choose to adopt an atti 
tude of optimism. In one way or 
another, however, the situation must 
be dealt with, and promptly, too. 

One of the evidences of this decay 
is the rapid increase within recent 
years in the number of students, es 
pecially the men, who fail to join a 
society. There has always been a 
certain proportion of such students 
who for various reasons did not care 
to participate in this type of extra 
curricular activity, but the last few 
seasons have disproportionately add- 
ed to their numbers. And with that 
increase, there has risen a group of 
"hangers-on" whose presence is by 
no means complimentary to any cam- 
pus, and who tend to propogate their 
species figuratively speaking. 

These "hangers-on", whatever the 
reasons they give, do not "belong" 
a student who is compelled to sup- 
port himself and who knows what 
it is to be "dead broke" not once or 
twice but frequently and chronically 
despite every effort at economy the 
excuse is a perfectly legimate one. 
But the parisites either do not fall 
within this class or lack the good 
sense to resign themselves to their 
lot and accept it as one of the sac- 
rifices they must make to secure a 
college education. 

The time arrives for a joint ses- 
sion. By the determined effort of 
loyal members a fine program is pre- 
pared. And then the eats are served 1 , 
paid for, of course, by the dues of the 
members. My how the membership 
does grow — for one night! If new stu- 
dents alone constituted this gfoup or 
if they were to attend merely a few 
of these affairs, the societies would 
be perfectly satisfied 1 . They invite 
such students to come and look them, 
over before they join. But when the 
number is swelled to the present pro- 
portions and the "hangers-on" persist 
in putting on the "cheap-skate" act, 



the society-treasurers, become uneasy, 
to put it mildly, and we don't blame 
them! 

We hope that a word to the wise 
will be sufficient. If you want to 
enjoy the benifits of a society, join 
one and help it along. Don't make 
the other fellow pay for the eats and 
prepare the program for you. And 
don't force the societies to take the 
action which they will be compelled 
to take if you do not mend your 
ways. That would be unworthy of 
Lebanon Valley. 

O 

JOURNALIST LECTURES 

ON MEXICAN LIFE 



Mr. James Caleb Sawders spoke 
on "The Wonderland of Mexico" Mon- 
day evening in the chapel. Mr. Saw- 
ders is a Journalist and a Lecturer. 
His travels in Mexico as an ag-?nt of 
the press well qualifies him as an au- 
thority on his topic. He has a charm- 
ing personality and a wry humor that 
made his talk extremely interesting. 

"Mexico," said Mr. Sawders, "is 
generally viewed by the Americans 
as a Nation of revolutions. But this 
is only due to the American Press 
which is always seeking to give the 
American public a thrill and a revolu- 
tion will usually serve the purpose. 
Nevertheless, the Mexican Press does 
the same in regard to our events, and 
anything pertaining to a gang-war or 
Chicago will usually finds itself on 
the front page of their papers." 

Another fallacy which Mr. Sawders 
dispelled was that the American bor 
der towns were Mexican. These, he 
emphatically stated, were run by 
Americans and anyone who has only 
visited these towns cannot really say 
that he has seen Mexico. 

All during his lecture he had slides, 
and motion pictures emphasizing with 
more lucidity the beauties of Mexico. 

"The majority of people are In- 
dians," he went on, "and it is by 
playing upon their ignorance that the 
various revolutionary leaders succeed 
in getting adherents to their cause 
The chief event in a normal Mexi- 
can's life is the market. The market 
furnishes profit, a reward for their 
work; social activities, which breaks 
the monotony of their their existence 
and here is the only place where they 
can get any news of the outside 
world. 

Also one must not get the idea that 
the Mexican is lazy. I believe that 
there are very few men who will 
do as much work for as little money 
as they. (Here he exposed a slide 
which pictured a man carrying 200 
pounds of pottery on his back.) 

The chief industries of the people 
are weaving and pottery. Though 
primitive methods still persist, they 
manufacture quite a portion of 
world's supply." 

He also showed slides of Exochin- 
ico the Mexican Venice which lies 
just outside of Mexico City. Though 
the waters are the main thorough- 
fares there are no buildings of ap- 
preciable size. 

The lecture was extremely inform- 
ative and interesting. The deplor- 
able part about it was the small at- 
tendance. 

O 

READER'S PRESENT 

RUSSIAN PROGRAM 




sian poetry — which consisted of se 
lections of various works by cele 
brated poets, read very beautifully 
and in an appreciative manner by 
Ruth Cooper. Mary Ax and Helen 
Hain then presented a Russian 
drama which was splendidly portray- 
ed and greatly enjoyed. Tolstoi, one 
of Russian's outstanding writers, was 
ably discussed by Ethel Hower. She 
concluded her sketch by reading one 
of his very interesting short stories. 
Paul Evancoe then entertained the 
group with a carefully prepared 
treatise on Russian authors which 
except for the Russian names was 
easy to comprehend. To conclude a 
very fine program, Robert Eshleman 
gave an excellent resume of Russian 
literature and because of his facile 
narrative manner, all enjoyed 1 and 
appreciated this greatly. There fol- 
lowed a short discussion conducted by 
Miss Myers, who contrasted Russian 
literature with Iceland literature. 

The Reader's Club was honored 
with a guest, Miss Miriam Muth, of 
the class of '28 who had been great 
ly interested and very active in the 
club during her school days. 

O 

UNIQUE PROGRAM 

IN FRENCH CIRCLE 




ROBERT WRIGHT JACKS 



On Wednesday evening, April 2, 
the Reader's Club met in North Hall 
parlor to delve into Russian folk-, 
lore, poetry and drama — to learn the 
characteristics of the people who 
have put Europe on guard and have, 
by their turmoil and confusion, in 
recent years, by their civil upheav- 
als and strife, been the subject of 
world pity and 1 wonder. 

Many interesting sidelights were 
thrown upon Russian contributions to 
literature in the program which had 
been prepared. The meeting was 
ailed to order by Miss Hyland and 
the first number introduced'— Rus- 



A small group of the French circle 
met at Madame Johnson's from 6:30 
to 7:30 on Wednesday evening 
April 2, to discuss the beauties of 
French poetry. Each girl came pre 
pared to recite a poem in French 
Many were strikingly unique, at 
though the majority rendered were 
French classics. One of those present 
demonstrated a splendid feat of mem- 
ory by reciting a poem five verses in 
length. "In Flanders' Fields" was 
also cleverly transcribed and deliver- 
ed in French. After the poems hadi 
been recited, Miss Johnson intro 
duced 1 several clever French songs 
:uch as "La Marseillaise" and "Au 
Clair de la Lune" which added variety 
to the program. The program was 
concluded by the rendition of several 
interesting games, such as the "al 
ph r bet" — which were suggested by 
Madame Johnson, who made a de 
ightful and unassuming hostess. The 
uricus part of this club is that not 
j word of English is permitted to be 
poken for a whole hour; anyone 
transgressing is compelled to pay a 
fine. This should afford an excellent 
background for those who will be 
themselves in charge of a French 
class next year. 

O 

Y. W. NOTES 



"Hidden Treasures" was the sub- 
ject discussed at the "Friendly Hour" 
cn Sunday evening. A piano prelude, 
"The Rosary," rendered by Mary K. 
Goshert in a very impressive manner 
opened the program which was in 
charge of Marie Gelwicks. The 
Scripture lesson, found in Psalm 
19:14, was then read by the leader 
who also led the group in prayer. 

After this, the leader gave a story 
entitled "Growing Toward God" 
which pointed out various ways in 
which this might be accomplished 
Harriet Miller followed 1 this number 
with a vocal solo. Mary Ax then 
rendered her own interpretation of 
Hidden Treasures" which was much 
pppreciated by her listeners. Hen- 
rietta Wagner presented the final 
number on the program when she 
t6ld in a striking manner her idea of 
"Finding Master-pieces". The Mizpah 
benediction closed this first interest- 
ing session #iven under the direction 
of the new "Y" Cabinet. 

O 

Tn Washington, during an analysis 
of the purchasing powers and buying 
habits, the largest item of expendi- 
ture was found to be for candy, run- 
ning up to $9,172.25. Women's larg- 
est outlay was for cleaning clothes 
at a grand total of $4,242.85. 



, "Fuzzy* 1 ' — the three in one man. 
"Fuzzy" of our own Lebanon Valley 
Campus is something of everything 
rolled up in one. A student, an ath- 
lete, and a musician. 

"Fuzzy" has the hidden qualities of 
a 'blues' chaser and a P. P. (piano 
pouonder). His cherry countenance 
comes forth in all fashions and moods 
when he crashes into colorful tones 
that have become a part of him. He 
has served as the Glee Club accom- 
panist for two years. 

He is not only a play boy but also 
on A student. His "cracking the 
books" found him second honor stu- 
dent in his Sophomore year. He is 
at present the able Math assistant of 
Prof. Wagner, and a fore-coming 
Chemist of our College. 

Jacks is one of our best basketball 
players and predominates at third 
base. He also dabbles in class foot- 
ball. 

"Fuzzy" hails from Hummelstown 
and belongs to the Philokosmian Lit- 
erary Society. We hear that he in- 
tends to teach but we feel assured 
that he would 1 do as well if he kept 
up on the diamond or joined a good 
orchestra. 



DOROTHY ELIZABETH HIESTER 

"Dot" is a native of Lebanon, but 
for some reason prefers to iive in the 
Dorm. Perhaps she to craves this 
'college-life'. 

She is an exceedingly cheery per- 
son who smiles almost promiscuously. 
But surely smiling is not a crime! 

Miss Hiester, if we may be formal 
has also participated in many of the 
activities on the campus. She do-re- 
mis with the Eurydice Choral Club 
Has harangued many a heated ques- 
tion from the platform for dear old 
L - V. V Belongs to the Del- 
phian Literary Society and has held 
many offices at various times in the 

same Occasionally indulges in 

dramatics Plays piano Is 

interested in the big attractions on 
the campus and intends or rather is 
majoring in Latin. 

And in conclusion we affirm that 
those who know her well will suffer 
no less than the rest of us who have 
come in contact with her, when we 
return next year and find her gone. 




The alumni friends of Ross F. 
Nigrelli, '26, will be glad to learn 
that he is an instructor in New York 
University in New York City where 
he has taken a masters degree and 
has continued research. He recently 
sent Professor Derickson reprints of 
several of his contributions which 
have appeared in Transactions of 
American Microscopical Society, The 
Biological Bulletin, Annals de Pro 
tistology and Science. He also invites 
any Lebanon Valley Seniors who 
have majored in Biology to apply for 
teaching fellowships in the depart- 
ment in which he is working. 
O ■ 



COLLEGE CALENDAR 



Thursday, April 10 — Girls inter- j 
class Basketball — Juniors vs. J 
Sophs. 

Glee Club at Myerstown. 
j Friday, April 11 — Tennis with! 
Bonebrake, 2:30. j 
Debate with Albright — home. j 
Literary Societies' Meetings. 
Joint Session — Clio and Kalo. 
Sunday, April 13— Y. M. and Y. W 

Meetings. 
Tuesday, April 15 — Prayer Meet- 1 
ing. I 
Wednesday, April 16 — Easter Re-j 

cess begins, 4:00. 
Wednesday, April 23 — Easter Re-j 

i 



cess ends, 4:00. 




Friday evening, April 11, 1919, the 
Kalozetean Literary Society held its 
forty second anniversary. The pro- 
gram which measured up to the usual 
standards of that organization was 
as follows: 
President's Address. 
Oration — "Wisdom, the Birth of 

Freedom." 
Piano Solo — "Prelude" — Rachnanin- 

off. 

Oration — "Playing the Game." 
Oration — "Making Democracy Safe 

for the World." 
Quartet— "Not Understood." 
Reading— "The Gentleman of the 

Plush Rocker." 
A reception followed in the gym- 
nasium. 

O 



On the evening of April 1st, 1919. 
the W. S. G. A. gave an April Fool 
party to the rest of the girls. 

Each one was a fool to begin with 
and became a greater fool as the 
evening advanced. The entertainment 
consisted of inter-class contests. The 
games played were these: A peanut 
hunt, a pole vault, a balloon contest, 
a penny race, a slipper scramble, an 
a pot shot. The Sophomores won the 
Silver Cup in these contests. 

The refreshment committee P re ' 
sumed each one to be a fool, for the 
plates were all hidden. Then P er ' 
haps after a long hunt one &^ 
would find that hers was "fast d»f ' 
or her plate was entirely empty a fi 
she had t "smile, smile, srnd e • 
Everyone left in a good humor, ho^ 
ever. 



LA VIE COLLEGlENNE, THURSDAY, APRIL 10, 1930. 



PAGE THREE 




"A COLLEGE JOKE TO CURE THE 'BLUES'" 

— Jonathan Swift. 



KAPPA LAMBDA NU 



'Just put it on my Bill,' said the young widow as she left a wreath at 
the cemetery. 

— LVC— 

For sale — one chaste lounge and other furniture — ad in a Mobile paper. 

— LVC — 

An old darkie was tending the coats upstairs in the Governor's man- 
sion. He noticed a prominent politician tumbling them over, looking under 
the bed, and so on. 

"Kin Ah help you, suh?" 

"I can't find my new hat; paid ten dollars for it yesterday." 
"Bless you, suh. All the new hats been gone ovah an hour or mo'." 

— LVC— 
THERE'S NO ESCAPE 

Lean men and clean men, 
Wild men and mild men. 
Wee men and he-men, 
Numb men and dumb men, 
Tailor men and sailor men, 
Pinch hitters, steam fitters, 
Golf players, man slayers 
Jobbers and robbers 
Get married. 

Tall girls and small girls, 
Big girls and trig girls, 
Neat girls and sweet girls, 
Cash girls and rash girls, 
Bad girls and sad girls, 
Circus riders, home abiders, 
Opera singers, hash slingers, 
Cooks and Crooks 

Marry them. 

— LVC— 
I had the right of way, didn't I? 
Yeh, but the other fellow had a truck. 

— LVC— 

Mr. Newly-wed — Your bread is all right but it's not as light as Mother's. 
Mrs. Ditto — Well, I might add that your roll is lighter than Dad's. 

— LVC— 

"Imagine my embarrassment," said Dumb Dora, "when, according of my 
custom, I looked under the bed before retiring. I had forgotten I was in an 
u PPer berth." 

— LVC— 

Minister— The offering of the morning will be taken, to aid the Arch Fund 
and not as erroneously printed in the Parish Bulletin, to aid the Arch Fiend. 

— LVC— 

Billie Coleman — I've got a date. I'm hungry, I am! 
Say, Mom, was baby sent down from Heaven? 
Yes, son, 

1 guess they like to have things quiet up there, huh, Mom ? 

— LVC— 

An egg a day keeps the ax away, as the Old Hen said to the new recruit. 

n. -Lvc- 

ine needle, Watson! 

Mother— Tommy, the canary has disappeared. 

Tommy— That's funny. It was there just now when I tried to clean i\ 
ltn tn © vacuum cleaner, 
tern — LVC— 

RELIEVE IT OR NOT— 
Kinney has a chin. 

A quarter of a million Chinese live on water. 
, The unluckiest fellow on earth was the one who was run over by an am- 
biance. 

De nni s also bats. 

-LVC— 
^naub— Where's Andy this year? 
Hovis— He's at Med. school. 
Knaub— Which one ? 

ovig — Georgetown. 
Knaub— What's he studying for? 

— LVC— 

out y feed the Prisoners at Sing-Sing yeast to keep thm from breakinj 
a 8h T ^ e best way to keep warm at night is to reach for a blanket instead* of 



On Friday evening, after the in- 
stallation of the officers of Clionian 
Literary Society, the newly elected 
President, Esther Angstadt, took 
charge of the meeting. Naomi Shive- 
ly assumed the duties of her new of- 
fice as chaplain, conducting an inspir- 
ing devotional service. 

Sophia Morris read a well-written 
and clever original essay "The Origin 
of April Fool," which told of the 
practices — ancient and modern — of 
the first day of April. 

Following a number of humorous 
remarks by Ann Augusta Esbenshade 
Margaret Smyser gave a resume of 
the works of Edward Lord Dunsany 
the author of "The Glittering Gate", 
one of the plays used on Kalo's re- 
cent anniversary program. Katherine 
Gockley reported on the biography 
of Christopher' Morley, who wrote 
"Thursday Evening". After having 
learned the most important facts con- 
cerning these two authors, the Clio 
girls were able to better appreciate 
the plays on the following Saturday 
evening. 

Eulalie Morton entertained with 
several poems pertaining to Spring, 
after which Alcesta Slichter brought 
the program to a close with the ren- 
dition of two splendid piano solos. 

O 

PHI LAMBDA SIGMA 



MUSIC STUDENTS 

DISPLAY TALENT 



students 
held in 
evening, 



A recital, featuring the 
of the conservatory, was 
"*Engle Hall, on Tuesday 
April 8, at eight o'clock. 

The program was opened with a 
piano solo "Dance Petite" by Loth, 
played by Geraldine Harkins. Miss 
Harkins proved an able representa- 
tive of the talent of the younger Con- 
servatory students. Catherine Kreid- 
er made her debute in violin playing 
when she played in a lovely style the 
Scottish Folk Song, "Flow Gently 
Sweet Afton." This was followed by 
a light and daintly played piano num- 
ber "Murmuring Zephyrs" by Jensen 
Niemans, played by Sara Light. Lil- 
lian Bowman next displayed her tal- 
ent on the violin by playing "Even- 
ing Song" by Moffatt, after which 
Mary Grace Mills played with great 
^ delicacy and grace Chaminade's 
'Pieretti". Corine Dyne then pleased 
her listeners with a delightful organ 
solo "A Woodland Idyl," by Reiff 
Following this Eleonor Kissinger dis- 
played great rhythmical quality in a 
piano number "A German Dance" by 
Beethoven. More violin talent was 



Philo featured ; a short but inter- 
esting meeting last Friday evening 
at 6:15. The chaplain, Harry Zech. 
opened the program with devotions, 
showing the value of spiritual things 
in college life in his Scripture selec- 
tion and short talk. Clinton Allen 
then spoke on the subject, "Life as an 
Orchardist." He recounted his rather 
extensive experience as an orchard- 
ist, and told of the pleasures connect- 
ed 1 with the work both from the 
viewpoint of an overseer and that of 
a workman. The next feature on the 
program was musical. Harry Zech 
and Fred Mund played two clarinet 
and violin duets. The first was a 
minuet entitled "The Three Graces", 
the second, a march called "The 
Scoutmaster". The tones of the two 
instruments blended admirably, and 
the number proved enjoyable to all 
Barrack Room Ballads" was the 
subject of a talk given by Francis 
Barr. He very interestingly told of 
his C. M. T. C. experiences, describ- 
ing work and pleasures connected 
with life in a training camp. After 
some general remarks the meeting 
was declared adjourned to meet in 
short business session. 



DELTA LAMBDA SIGMA 



On Friday evening, the members of 
Delphian Literary Society enjoyed 
another well-planned program. The 
devotions conducted by the new Chap 
lain, Sara Ensminger, were taken 
from the first chapter of St. John. 

The opening number on the pro 
gram was a piano solo played by 
Elanor Kissinger with her usual skill 
and technique. A humorous reading 
"Cotton Mather Goes Awooing" was 
then given by Betty Hoy in a very 
interesting and entertaining manner, 
The final number consisted of two 
brief, witty selectios read by Edith 
Fieds; the one, entitled "In 1970" 
showed how concentrated tablets of 
one form or another will eventually 
take the place of restaurant cooking 
even as, the latter has greatly re 
placed' home-cooking at the present 
age; the other, entitled "Our Maude 
pointed out how a radio can change 
even a kitchen girl's view of life, and 
make her ambitious to advance in 
the world by winning prizes for 
choice recipes! 

The report of the critic, Ruth Lil 
ler, which was quite lengthy and 
touched all angles of the evening 
proogram, brought the meeting to 

close. 



evident when Russell Hatz rendered 
"Conzoneths," by Schmidt. 

Gladys Wagner then played a light 
but colorful piano selection, "To 
Spring," by Grieg. This was fol- 
lowed by three vocal selections 
"Lonely Heart" by Nevin, "Sink Red 
Sun" by De Reigo, and "One Gave 
Me A Rose" by Scott, sung by Doro- 
thy Hafer, whose deep, mellow con- 
tralto added a pleasing variety to 
the program. "Pastorale" by Foote, 
a calm and peaceful organ solo was 
then played with great skill by New- 
ton Burgner, after which Hilda Hess 
rendered with much feeling three De- 
bussy piano numbers "Danseuses de 
Delphes", "Reverie," and "Minstrels.' 
Dorothy Pengier, a saprano of a clear 
and tender quality then sang four 
numbers "Night Was Made of Lov- 
liness and Prayer" by Strickles. "A 
Bfird Note Calling" by Spross, "Sil- 
ently Blending" by Mozart, and "The 
Lark Now Leaves His Watery Nest" 
by Parker. The program was con- 
cluded with an organ number "Sea 
Sketches," by Harver, a discriptive 
number which was beautifullly played 
by Effie Le Van. 



r 



OH, 

sure. . . that's the way they did 
it in '8 j . . . but act your age! 




THE boys of '87 did things in a dif- 
ferent way. 

They took buggy rides, of a Sunday, 
behind docile nags (unless the Livery 
Man had a sense of humor!) . . . 

They danced the Schottische with a 
slow and easy grace (unless they happened 
to know the disgraceful two-step!) 

They wrote laborious letters to the folks 
back home with stubborn, raspy pens 
(unless they were pressed for time and 
didn't write at all!) 

But listen to what the boys of '30 do! 

They buzz away over week-ends, behind 
eight -in -line engines that can do eighty 
without half trying; 

they fume through frantic fox-trots that 
would make an acrobat green with envy; 

they go to telephones and, almost in a 
jiffy, are talking with the Home Folks. 

How Tempus does Fugit! 

{P. S. This is NOT an automobile ad or 
an ad for your favorite dance orchestra! 
Just a reminder that telephoning Home 
is the modern way of keeping in touch.) 



c 




4 



PAGE IOUR. 



LA VIE COLLKGI ENN E, THURSDAY, APRIL 10, 1930. 



EURYDICE RENDERS 

BRILLIANT CONCERT 



(Continued from Page 1) 



suits of extensive preparation. The 
sol parts and obligato were beauti- 
fully sung by Miss Leah Miller. 

The Club Quartet, composed of the 
Misses Miller. Fisher Bachman, and 
Hess then gave a group of three 
songs "Mighty Like a Rose" by E. 
Nevin, "The Night Has a Thousand 
Eyes", by Baltwood, and "Supposing," 
by J. W. Bishoff. The young ladies' 
voices blending exceptionally well 
producing a lovely harmony. 

To give the audience an idea of the 
dramatic abiity of the Club a one 
Act Play, "Seven to One" by E. 
Westny York, was then given. This 
play was under the able direction of 
Miss Madeline Rife, and featured the 
Misses Dyne, Heister, Slichter, Yake, 
Flook, Garber, Thompson, and Eddy : 
each of whom portrayed her respec- 
tive part with much dramatic skill 
and ease. 

Miss Leah Miller, the Club soloist, 
as usual delighted her listeners with 
her interpretations and brilliant col- 
oratura passages, in a group of three 
songs "Song of My Soul" by BreiL 
"Flight" by Molley Crew, and "Wha. 
is a Song" by Peare Curran. 

The Club then made its final ap- 
pearance of the evening, in anothei 
group of three songs, "Stars of the 
Summer Night", a beautiful number 
by J. E. West, "The Galway Piper" 
a haunting Irish melody by P. E 
Fletcher, and "Evening Shadows", by 
G. R. Ricci. This last number was of 
a restful and soothing nature anc 
proved a very fitting "Good-Night' 
to an enraptured audience. 

The Director of the Club, Prof 
Alexander Crawford deserves much 
credit for having so patiently and 
ably worked with the girls, who co- 
operated in preparing an excellent 
program of great musical value. 

The Reception 
(Continued from Page i) 



points. The final score was 33-23, in 
favor of the plebes. 

The game was unusually free of 
fouls 

O 

(Continued from Page i) 



ALUMNI ASSEMBLE 

AT KALO BANQUET 



dards set up by its founders. 

Rev. S. C. Ernest, the next speak- 
er also spoke of the society in his 
day. He urged that there should be 
no let-down in Kalo's progress. He, 
as an alumni, told of the great bene- 
fits he had 'derived and of the possi- 
bilities of further improvement. Rev. 
P. B. Gibble, D.D., the last speaker 
praised the society for its wonderful 
work and urged that this anniver- 
sary and mingling of Kalo "brothers" 
serve as a stimulus to create greater 
interest. The alumni were told of 
the important part they played and 
were asked' to give the untiring ef- 
fort necessary to keep Kalo in the 
race with the flight of time and its 
co-worker, progress. 

After Rev. Gibble's excellent speech 
all of the alumni present were given 
a chance to express their feelings to- 
wards the society that had meant so 
much to them. Many complimentary 
statements were made and in closing 
all present renewed their vows for 
better servic, cooperation and effort 
— the spirit of Kalo, may it live for- 
ever! 



A no - sliding - down - the-banister 
campaign is being conducted by the 
: anitors at the University of Cali- 
fornia, who have lodged a complaint 
because students forget what the 
chairs are for and use the banisters, 
n the future another campaign is 
)?ing considered — a no-cigarette-ash- 
3s-on-the-floor drive. 



THE PENNWAY i 

BARBERSHOP j 

i 

N. M. RAUSCH, Prop. 
Annvill*, Pa. 



-iOFFMAN STEAM PRESS- 
ING 

KEYSTONE HAT CLEANING 

STEVE WORMS 



10 W. Main St. 



Annville, P*. 



M. H. SMITH 

JEWELER 

Watches at Lowest Prices 
Watch and Clock Repairing 
38 Railroad St. Annville, Pa. 



place its attractive appearance. The 
paper was so arranged that the 'gym 
seemed to be the inside of a great 
Arabian tent. The lights, dimmed fet 
the colors of the lanterns, added much 
to the creation of this effect. The 
orchestra was seated on a platform 
elevated above the floor level. Thi 
aided the listeners because the musi 
was not muffled by the crowds and 
also gave much more space foi 
socializing. A new system of serv- 
ing refreshments was employed. A r 
the guests passed through the en- 
trance to their created wonderland 
they were served with ice cream 
cake and soft drinks. During the 
course of the evening other sof 
drinks were served by Kalo's stand 
bys, the under-classmen. All present 
indulged in friendly chats and othe 
pastimes until they were brought to e 
close by the tolling of the mid nigh;- 
hour. 



PLEBES WIN FROSH- 

JUNIOR CAGE MATCH 

The girls' inter-class basketball 
team of the freshman class won their 
first victory of the series by defeat- 
ing the Juniors, Thursday evening, 
April 3, in the L. V. C. gymnasium. 
The game was exciting as the inter- 
class games go. From beginning to 
end it was each girl for herself. 

The frosh opened the game with a 
rush of baskets and continued the 
scoring streak with the result that 
they had the lead of a 17-5 score at 
the end of the half. 

The juniors broke loose in the third 
quarter and sank shot after shot un- 
til the score was 19-17 in favor of 
the frosh. But this streak was soon 
over and the first-year girls began 
their scoring again while the juniors 
only succeeded in making a few more 



FOR RE1NT 

Furnished Apartment or Rooms for 
married or single students during the 
?cming year. Fcr particulars see 

MRS. GEO. HEILMAN, 
457 E. Main St., Annville, Pa. 



PHOTOGRAPHS 

LIVE FOREVER 

Ulrich's Studio 

820 Cumberland St. 



PRINTING 




P U B 1> ICATION. 
BOOKS, CATA 
LOGUES, STATION- 
ERY, CARDS, TAGS, 

ANNVILLE PRINTING 

C 

ANNVILLE ........ PA 



^ is 



FOR ADVANCE C OAT OR DRESS 
DON'T FA] L TO VISIT 

ROSE SINGER SHOP 

LEBANON, PA. 



761 CUMBERLAND ST 



HSISSgllESIgllSig^ 



PARKER FOUNTAIN PENS 

GUARANTEE D FOR LIFE 

Two Pens in One— A Desk Pen and a Pocket Pen. 
Ask To S ee Them. 

ESBENSHADE'S BOOK STORE 



38 N. 8th St. 



Lebanon, Pa. 



CLOTHING OF QUALITY 

JSBASEHORE 

Lebanon, Pa. 



Shaeffer's Lifetime Pens — 

NONE BETTER ABSOLUTELY GUARANTEED 

AN EVERYDAY NECESSITY FOR 
COLLEGE STUDENTS 

T T A TO nr T > O The Gift Store of Lebanon 
H. ArVX Mi/Li O 757-759 Cumberland Street 



H W MILLER 



HARDWARE 
OF QUALITY 



Annville 



Pa. 



PRINTING 

When you want work 
of the better kind see 

HIESTER— The Printer 



1 FBERLEW 
DEPARTMENT STORE 

Two Doors From Post Office 

Invites your inspection of 
General Merchandise 



ARTISTS SUPPLIES 

Canvas, Parchment, Japanese Tissue, 
Fabriano White and Grey Charcoal 
Papers, Whatman's Hot and Cold- 
pressed Papers, Oil, Water and 
Decora Colors, Brushes, Atomizers, 
China Palettes, Drawing Boards, Col- 
ored Crayons and Pencils. 

All high grade materials 

BOLLMANS 

.33 South Eighth Street, 
Lebanon, Pa. 



D. L SAYLOR & SONS 

Contractors 

LUMBER AND COAL 



ANNVILLE. PA. 



s? 1 1 



For 

QUALITY PLUS 

in 

Material and Workmanship 
Repairs at Special Rates 
Go To 

ANNVILLE SHOEMAN 
207 W. Main 



TRY OUR HOME MADE 
SANDWICHES 

QUALITY LUNCH 

BREYER'S ICE CREAM 
A Specialty 

7 E. Main St. Annville, Pa. 



For Quality 



Baked Products 



Patronize 



FINK'S BAKERY 



Main Street 



TENNIS SUPPLIES 

RACKETS AND TENNIS 
BALLS 

at Moderate Prices 
We restring your old Rackets 



GRIMMS 



COLLEGE BOOK STORE 



CHEFS 
HOUSE OF GOOD 

flnnn 



Wm. Penn Highway 
Near Annville 



Meals Served at All Hours 

BANQUETS AND PARTIES 
Our Specialty 



KREAMER BROS. 



STEINITE RADIOS 
EASY ELECTRIC WASHER 
COLUMBIA GAS STOVES AND RANGES 
RUGS AND LINOLEUMS 

"House of Better Values" 
FURNITURE AND UNDERTAKING 

328 W. Main St. Phone 6R3 



Annville, P«- 



WHITMAN'S EASTER CANDIES 
Fresh Line of Packages and Eggs 

THE PENNIAY 

OPPOSITE P. O. 
A FULL LINE OF FRESH PASTRY DAILY 



BRING YOUR 
FRIENDS TO 
MAY DAY 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



PHILO 
ANNIVERSARY 
SATURDAY 



VOLUME VI 



ANNVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA, THURSDAY, MAY 1, 1930. 



No. 5 



L V. SPLITS EYEN 
IN TENNIS MATCHES 



TRIMS BONEBRAKE 
AND LOSES TO 
F. & M. 



The Lebanon Valley tennis team 
split even in its first two matches of 
the season, outclassing Bonebrakt 
Theological Seminary on Friday af- 
ternoon, April 11, 7-0, and losing a 
close match to F. & M. at Lancaster 
Wednesday, April 23. 

Dunmoyer, Fink, and Ulrich were 
the Lebanon Valley boys who chalked 
up victories in the singles against 
F. & M. Dunmoyer and Fink also 
came through in their doubles. 

Charles Apple, No. 1 man for F. 
& M. scored the easiest victory of 
the day over Shroyer, L. V. 6-3, 6-3. 
Landreth, F. & M. won over Hertzler, 
L. V. in a hard fought match 7-5, 
6-3, 7-5. John Rank played a good 
game but lost in straight sets to 
Leaman, P. & M., 7-9, 10-12. 

Each of the Lebanon Valley men 
who won dropped the first set and 
then rallied to take the victory. Dun- 
moyer, L. V. defeated Hazeltine, F 
& M., 3-6, 7-5, 7-5. Fink, L. V. beat 
Von Seldonick, F. & M. 3-6, 6-4, 6-4 
and Ulrich, L. V. won from Watch 
horn, F. & M., 0-6, 6-4, 6-0. 

In doubles Apple and Landreth, 
F. & M. defeated Shroyer, and Hertz 
ler, L. V. 6-3, 8-6. Dunmoyer and 
Fink L. V. defeated Hazeltine and 
Von Seldonick, F. & M., 2-6, 7-5, 6-4 
Watchorn and Leaman, F. & M. de- 
feated Filler and Rank, L. V., 6-1 
4 -6, and 7-5 to bring victory to the 
Lancaster team. 

Against Bonebrake Seminary, Leb- 
anon Valley found the going rather 
easy and dropped only two sets in 
the seven matches. 

The feature of the afternoon was 
the play between Hertzler, L. V., and 
Oyer of Bonebrake. Hertzler started 
lr * good form and took the first set 
rather easily 6-2. In the second set 
°yer got started, winning it 6-3. The 
outcome was a toss up during the 
third set both men playing excellent 
games . Hertzler finally won with 
the score 8-6. 

Howe, no. 4 of Bonebrake, was the 
on ly other Bonebrake man to take a 
set. He won the first from Rank 
6 " 4 but Rank took the next two 6-3 
This match was played on the 
w orst court so that there was little 
c hance for a good tennis. Both side 
P la Yed a defensive game.. 

Shroyer of L. V. beat Welty of 
B °nebrake 6-2, 6-3 in a well played 
Same. Dunmoyer won from Evan 
" 2 > 6-3 and Fink won from Merry 
6-4, 6-3. 

^ the doubles Shroyer and Hertz 
l * v paired to beat Welty and Oyer 
.' 3 > 6-1 while Dunmoyer and Hutch- 
ison defeated Evans and Howe 6-2, 
6-3. 



W. S. 



G. A. SURPRISES 
DEAN WITH PARTY 



On Monday afternoon, April 14th, a 
birthday surprise party, sponsored by 
the W. S. G. A., was given for Ma- 
dame Green, dean of women. The 
presentation of a gorgeous basket of 
flowers was made by Madeline Rife. 
The birthday gift which Madame 
Green received from the girls was a 
W. S. G. A. pin. 

There was a short and delightful 
program given. Eva Peck gave one 
of her readings, The Bassons Go To 
Annville. Mary K. Goshert played 
Rigaudos, by Macdowell. Hester 
Thompson sang, My Garden of To- 
morrow, and Gladys Hershey and 
Herrietta Wagner danced' The Sail- 
or's Hornpipe. 

Following the program refresh- 
ments were served and a social hour 
was enjoyed by everyone. 

DOUBLEDEFEAT 
OPENS SEASON 



QUITTIE WILL BE 
HERE FOR MAY DAY 



& M. AND PENN SHUT 
OUT L. V. BATS- 
MEN 



Lebanon Valley College started the 
baseball season very inauspiciously 
losing to F. & M. and Penn State 
in games that resembled track meets 
F. & M. won 8-7 at Lancaster and 
Penn State took a 16-2 victory at 
State College, Saturday, 26. 

The game with F. & M. wa 
scheduled to go seven innings clue 
to cold weather, but the score was 
tied at 7 all at the conclusion of the 
geventh necessitating an extra in- 
uing. 

F. & M. blanked its rivals in the 
first half of the eighth, and then 
came back and pushed the winning 
run across. Mazloff, the first man 
up, singled and went to second on a. 
wild pitch. Smoker then laid down a 
bunt and when Heller threw the ball 
over Dennis' head, Mazloff came home 
with the winning run. 

Lebanon Valley outhit F. & M. but 
erratic fielding and wildness of the 
pitchers proved the downfall. 

At Penn State last Saturday, Leb 
anon Valley staged a "Comedy of 
Errors" as State indulged in a heavy 
batting practice. The game was lost 
in the second inning when they scored 
ten runs. In this inning fourteen 
Lions came up to bat. Saltzman and 
( Young scored two runs apiece in 
this session. 

Daub finished the game from the 
third inning. Penn State used three 
pitchers in the game each one prov 
ing effective. 

Musser hit a homer for State and 
Hobbs starred in the field with a 
one-hand catch with two Lebanon 
Valley men on base. 

(Continued on Page Four) 



EDITOR PLEASED TO AN- 
NOUNCE EARLY 
ARRIVAL 



The student body will be pleased 
t learn that the 1931 Quittapahilla 
will make its appearance on the cam- 
pus on May Day, May 3, 1930. The 
staff, in view of the fact that thl.s. 
event marks the achievement of a 
coveted goal, take the keenest pleas- 
ure in making this announcement. 
The prompt delivery of the books is 
due to the efficient service of the 
Williamsport Printing and the Can- 
ton Engraving Companies. 

Plans are in the making for a Quit- 
te Sales Booth on the campus during 
the May Day exercises. This will give 
the visitors an opportunity to pur- 
chase one of the new arrivals. An- 
nouncements concerning the plan of 
distribution to students will be made 
later, such plans being tentative as 
LA VIE goes to press. 

O 

SOPH VICTORY CLOSES 

INTER-CLASS SERIES 



GLEEMEN JOURNEY 

TO JOHNSTOWN 



The Men's Glee Club traveled to 
Johnstown last Friday to give a con- 
cert in one of the United Brethern 
Churches of that city. 

The Club left Annville Friday 
morning and arrived; in Johnstown 
in the afternoon. The afternoon was 
spent in seeing the city and indulg- 
ing a swim at the Y. M. C. A. 

At night the Club gave a fine con- 
cert which, judgeing from statements 
which were made, met with the ap- 
proval of all who heard it. 

The Club will give its annual Home 
concert on May Day at 8 P. M. This 
promises to be a fine program and 
should not be missed by anyone. 
O 



URSINUS DEBATERS 
DEFEAT NEGATIVES 



MYLINMEN LOSE 
TO GETTYSBURG 



With a 32-21 victory, the sopho- 
more girls' inter-class basketball 
team triumphed over the junior cage 
stars, Tuesday afternoon, April 15, in 
the Alumni gymnasium. 

The juniors opened the game with 
several well-aimed shots and the 
game was soon going at a great rare 
of speed. The sophomores were a lit- 
tle slow in starting as the score show- 
ed at the end of the first quarter 12-9, 
favoring the juniors. After the first 
quarter both teams worked harder 
with the result that fewer poinls 
were made. The sophs led at tne 
half. 

In the second half of the game the 
juniors forged ahead and showed 
some real opposition for a while but 
at the final blow of the whistle the 
score stood 32-21 with the sophomores 
the victors. 

This game closed the title matches 
and although the sophomores won 
this game, their defeat at the hands 
lof the seniors the week before pre- 
vented them from being the girls' in- 
ter-class champions. 

The following is a result of the 
classes in order of their standing: 
Won Lost Pet. 



Seniors 

Sophomores 
Freshmen . 
Juniors 



100 

66 2-3 
33 1-3 
000 



0- 



Starting at once, the regular after- 
noon schedule of classes will be 
change to the following: 

Dinner 12:20 

First Class 1:20 

Second Class 2:10 

Third Class 3:00 



Lebanon Valley College lost its 
third straight baseball game on Tues- 
day evening to Gettysburg 10-0. From 
start to finish everything went Get- 
tysburg's way and the game soon be- 
came uninteresting. 

Patrizio started' on the mound for 
Lebanon Valley but soon round the 
going tough. In the first inning 
McMillan tripled and came home im- 
mediately as the throw in got past 
all the infielders. In the third and 
fourth frames each Gettysburg gath- 
ered three runs. Bovino was sent in- 
to the box and finishe dthe game. 
Gulian, the opposing second sacker, 
lead the hitting with four solid blows 
one a double and one a triple. In his 
other time to bat he received a walk 

Meanwhile Hass, the visiting pitch- 
er, was pitching a beautiful game. 
Only three hits were made off of 
him while he struck out twelve men 
No one got farther than second base. 

In the late innings Lebanon Val- 
ley's efforts were concentrated in 
bringing in a run. They amost sue 
ceeded in the ninth inning when with 
Shorty on second as a result of a pass 
and stolen base, "Jap" Albright con- 
nected solidly with the ball. However 
the Gettysburg outfield was playing 
deep and Roche got under the ball 
for the final putout. 

On Saturday, May Day, F. & M. 
come her for a return game. The 
team will be fighting hard to erase 
the defeat at Lancaster. 

REGULAR MEETING 

OF COMMERCE CLUB 



The Commerce Club held its reg- 
ular meeting in the small dining 
hall on Monday evening April 28, 
with Homer Allwein in charge. 

After the meal was served, Mr. J 
U. Sarg, Insurance Broker from 
Lebanon, spoke to the club about In 
surance. He told' of the advantages 
of the Insurance Trust over the reg 
ular Insurance business. His speech 
was enjoyed by all. 

After the address, the Club indulg 
ed in a few songs and then adjourn 
ed. 



2-1 



DECISION IS 
DEFEAT OF 
SEASON 



FIRST 



In one of the most interesting de- 
bates of the season, the affirmative 
team of Ursinus College won a 2-1 
victory over the negative team of L. 
V. C. in Philo hall, Monday evening, 
April 28, before an appreciative audi- 
ce. 

The question for debate was, Re- 
solved: That the U. S. withdraw 
from the Kellogg Peace Pact. The 
affirmative upheld their side of the 
argument with some very good 
points in favor of the United States 
withdrawing, while the negative 
team came back equally strong in 
their contentions for not withdraw- 
ing. The arguments, pro and con, 
were excellent, in delivery as well 
as content and they showed thor- 
ough preparation and extensive 
study of the subject prior to the 
debate. The rebuttals, the real test 
of debating, were everything they 
they should have been. It was a 
dixiicu'lt matter to decide the vic- 
tors but the judges gave their de- 
cision in favor of Ursinus. 

Prof. Shenk of the History depart- 
ment of L. V. C. acted in the capac- 
iy of chairman, The members of 
the vising team were Messrs. Benja- 
min, Barnes and Jacobs. Dr. White, 
dean of Ursinus College, accompan- 
ied the young ladies as chaperons. 

The L. V. C. representatives were 
Miss Daly and Messrs. Heilman 
and Etter. 

This debate closed the season for 
the negatives team of Lebanon Val- 
ley College. It was a most success- 
ful season, they having won five 
debates and lost but one. 

The affirmative team will battle 
with the forensic artists of St. 
Thomas College, Friday, May 9, in 
Philo Hall. 

O 

Don't forget the Glee Club Con- 
cert in the Engle Conservatory of 
music Saturday night, May 3. Bring 
your friend and enjoy an evening of 
real intertainment. 

. O 



COLLEGE CALENDAR! 



! Friday, May 2 — Philo Annivers-j 



ary. 

Saturday, May 3 — Home Concert 

of Men's. Glee Club; F. & M. 

Baseball game, at home. Anu- 

al May Day fete. 
Sunday, May 4— Y. M. & Y. W. 

meeting. 

fruesday, May 6 — Tennis with 

Elizabeth town, 2:30 P. M. 
Wednesday, May 7 — Ursinus Base- j 
ball game, at home. 



MGE TWO 



ESTABLISHED 1925 



A weekly publication by the Under 
graduate Students of Lebanon 
Valley College 



EDITORIAL STAFF 

Russel Etter, '31 Editor-in-Chief 

Ruth Liller, '31 Associate Edito 

R. Roudabush, '31 .... Associate Edito 
R .Morgan, '31 .... Managing Edito 



BEPOBTOBIAL STAFF 

Robert Eshleman, '31 

Madeline Sheddy, '31 

Ruth Shroyer, '32 

Hilda Buckley, '32 

Walter Krumbeigel, '33 

General Reporter 

Mary Goshert, '32 Conservator 

Robert Rawhouser, '32 Athletic 

Dorothy Garber, '32 CHonia 

Mary Epply, '32 Delphian 

Percy Clements, '33 Kalozetean 

Fred Mund, '32 Philokosmian 

Edna Early, '31 .... Alumni Reporter 



BUSINESS STAFF 

G. Becker, '31 .... Business Manager 
P. Keene, '32 Asst. Business Managei 
C. Wise, '31 .... Circulation Manaj 



FACULTY ADVISORS 

Dr. Paul A. W. Wallace, English Dept. 
Miss Mary K. Wallace, English Dept, 
Dr. Paul S. Wagner. Math. Dept 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, a membe 
of the Intercollegiate Newspaper Asso 
elation of the Middle Atlantic States 



Single Copies IP cents 

Subscription $1.50 per year 

Entered at the Annville, Pa., post- 
office as second class matter under the 
Act of March 3, 1879. 



MAY DAY 



On Saturday, May 3, the annual 
May Day festivities will be held 
This year several surprises are 
scheduled and many unique fea 
tures. The dances are most unusual 
and Prof. Showers is doing his best 
to make this May Day program one 
of the most original ever presented 
The Y. W. president also has a huge 
burden on her shoulders and 
working with untiring effort. The 
time for preparation is extremely 
limited and has been shortened con- 
siderably by several delays, princi- 
pal among them the refusal of many 
of the men to coopei-ate. 

At this late date, little can be done 
in the way of urging the student 
body to support those who are doing 
their best to reach the standard sei 
by former fetes, but it is hoped that 
everyone will give his or her hearty 
cooperation in the few days remain- 
ing. Your friends will be here to 
pass judgment on the festivities. 
You don't want them to carry away 
the impression that you are attend- 
ing a mediocre institution. So get 
busy and help to uphold this time- 
honored tradition in genuine Blue- 
and-White fashion. 

O 

A FEW SUGGESTIONS 



Our attention has been called to 
the growing dissatisfaction, princi- 
pally on the part of the male section 
of the student body, with the seat- 
ing arrangement at the tables in the 
dining hall. We understand that 
this responsibility falls upon a very 
small group of students, considered 
by many to be inadequately repre- 
sentative of the student body. 

We realize that the whole mattei 
is of no serious consequence, a petty 
annoyance at most. It is further- 
more impossible to please everybody 
in working out these arrangements. 
And yet we feel that in the interest 



of general comfort and contentment, 
those in charge should attempt to 
please the largest possible number 
of students. 

V\|ould it not, therefore, relieve 
the few who are at present respon- 
sible for the situation if they were 
to consult with several other mem- 
bers of the student body, particular- 
ly the representatives of the men ? 
Might it not be better, also, to change 
the arrangement more frequently? 
And if these efforts fail, would it not 
be considerably wiser to adopt a fixed 
method of making up the seating 
arrangement, a method that would 
entirely relieve those responsible of 
all suspicion of partiality? 
_o ■ 



SNEAK-THIEVES 



We do not wish to appear vindic- 
tive; we hope we have as much of the 
forgiving spirit as anyone. But there 
are evidently a few students at this 
institution who absolutely do not de- 
serve the honor of attending Lebanon 
Valley College. Anyone who can 
make him or her self so small as to 
perpetuate a series of petty sneak- 
thefts deserves to purchase a ticket 
for "Elsewhere" at once, and quite 
frankly we would be mighty glad to 
aid in bringing about such a pur- 
^i.o.jo. This form of annoyance has 
taken an alarming increase this year 
on all arts of the campus. We hope 
this unpleasant matter need not be 
mentioned gain, and that those con 
cerned will relieve the rest of the stu- 
dents of the necessity of employing 
drastic measures to curb their preda 
tory activities. 

O 

TRY THIS ONE ON 

YOUR VOCABULARY 



FROSH THOUGHTS 



An interesting experiment recently 
conducted by Professor Fields in 
Latin 46 class has proved so enter 
l aining that we could not keep it to 
ourselves. Of course, all of you 
re?d the editorials published in the 
LA VIE — and take some of them to 
heart, we hope. But those of you 
who didn't, have an opportunity to 
orofit by the process of second im 
pre^sion. Naturally you'll all be able 
to understand perfectly the author 
ized version of the first twenty-five 
Mnes of the editorial "Does It Pay," 
(as sublet "de magistro Fields") just 
as it would have appeared in the 
'ays of Augustus or Julius Caesar 01 
Cicero haranging the Roman mob it: 
the forum, or the market-place 
How easy it has been to transcribe 
the modern Yankee style to dignified 
translated Latin, while still preserv- 
ing the original sense, we leave for 
vou to guess. Words and phrases — 
'legitimate subjects for mirth-inspir- 
ng cartoons", "in the April issue of 
McCalPs magazine" — well, they al- 
most had us stumped. 

But here's how Professor Fields 
himself would do it: 

'Quod operae ire ad collegiam 
pretium est et tarn multum et tarn 
vehementer affirmatum est ut 
perpanci inveniri possint qui negeftt 
(qui non ean seventiam sustineant) 
Magnopere antem mirandum est quo 
mode ei gin in foro versentura suam 
sententiam de viris collegiorum nuper 
commutaverint Rita S. Halle Aprile 
mense in 'McCall's Magazine' sub 
tituts 'Quid nunc faciam' hanc com- 
mutationem indicavit, qui narrat 
principem mercatorum concitu magni 
haec dixisse: 'Nos vero eis qui ad 
gradum Baccalaurei admissi sunt 
nuper tradidimus. Usque ei (tem- 
pore) omnes existimaverunt eos esse 
infelices in foro et esse dignos qui 
ludibrio in pictures habeantur. Si 
aliquis horum vohut succipere negotia 
deleginter diploma celans, maestus de 
mercatore ad mercatorum progressus 
est. Hunc progredi hand necesse est. 
Nos contra ea, ad collegii portas eum 
petitum imus'.". 

Can you dope that our without re- 
ferring to the original? 



In view of the interest taken by 
the students in our new column, we 
have decided* to continue the publi- 
cation of exceptionally good Fresh- 
man thefes. This week we are in- 
debted to Mr. Walter Krumbeigle for 
the following: 

A FRESHMAN ON 

THE TUG-O-WAR 

Rain, wet cold' rain. Upper class- 
men say that it is ever thus, that 
it has become part of the tradition. 
Tradition, hollow word. Red, raw, 
bleeding hands, tradition! We do not 
know that tradition is sweetest as 
a memory. We are ignorant. We are 
Freshmen. Austere seniors recall 
their 'tug' days. Victory tastes sweet 
they say. We grow eager and long 
for the rope. We have forgotten 
those two training weeks. The day 
comes. Rain. 

We huddle in an alley and receive 
our final instructions. We cannot re 
member all, but one impresses us 
most. "Do not leave go of therope.' 
Nervousness envelopes us. We are 
Freshmen. We sing as we march to 
•he 'Quittie'. Dismally it runs through 
the field. It holds cold and defeat 
We are the first to arrive. Specta 
tors are coming. They huddle in lit 
tie groups. The day is not conducive 
to enthusiasm, It is cold. The Soph 
omores come. A few cheers greet 
'hem. We jest across the stream. The 
tension lessons. We have the choice 
of banks. The most favorable in se- 
lected. Hope enters our hearts. The 
pistol is rgfised — "Pull!" 

The rope creaks and swears. The 
Scphmores sink. The Freshman sink 
The Sophomores pull. We hold. The 
ooach's hand goes up to his hip. 
We are up. "Pull!" The rope curses 
and comes. "Pull!" The Sophomores 
u-e coming! "Pull!" We are winning! 
"Pull!" The Sophomores plunge into 
the creek. Our hearts laugh. We are 
happy: everybody is happy. Con- 
gratulations are cheap. We rush to 
the other side. This side is slippery. 
The Srphomores have made it thus 
in trying to resist us. We dig new 
holes. The gun is raised — click. The 
gun is quiet. Feverishly we improve 
cur holes. The gun — click. We are 
race horses at the tape, nervous 
quivering. The gun — -chash! "Pull!" 
The rope tears through our hands. 
Flying, groping, feet. We are losing! 
"Dig.! Dig!" The rope groans. We 
hold. The Quittie is hungry. "Hold, 
Hold!" The rope quivers. We are on 
our backs. This way we cannot win, 
but coming up is dangerous. We 
chance it. "Pull, Pull Pull!" we gain 
a few feet. We can ease more. They 
come up, pull. We pull. They pull. 
No difference. Our hands are red 
raw bleeding. Tradition! They pull. 
We pull. No diffeherce. The ground 
si cold. A feeble pull. We return it. 
No rope is gained'. Our arms ache. 
Cheers from the girls. No rope is 
gained. Individual cheers. The posi- 
tion of the rope not affected. We 
become conscious of the rain. The 
ground is wet. Our arms are cramp- 
ed, the hand are blistered and' torn, 
our feet our cold, it is raining. Tra- 
dition! They pull. We pull. The rope 
moves one way than the other. It 
is growing dark. Will we remain ever 
thus? "Pull! Hold! Hold! Hold! 
Pull!" Cheers, rain, straining bodies, 
cold. "Hold! Hold! Hold!" We grow 
peevish "Yeah, drat it we're holding. 
Shut up! Yeah we'll pull 'em. "No 
success. Hold! Pull! Hold!" When the 
devil is this going to end. "Sure were 
holding. No we won't give up; we're 
too dumb. No we wont budge. Were 
frozen here!" They have spoken of 
records. All have been passed, still 
we pull. We shiver in the wet and 
cold. The Men's Senate allows fif- 
teen minutes more. How considerate! 




JOSEPH FIORELLO 



From New Jersey comes this smil 
ing troubadour, for surely Joe anli 
music are synonymous. But do not 
think Joe is always singing, for 
metaphysical arguments are also one 
of his enjoyments. Aside from a 
few liberal contentions he remains a 
Fundamentalist at heart. But every 
man is entitled to his opinions. 

Joe is also a scholar, majoring in 
chemistry with the intention of at- 
tending a "Med" School next year. 
Those who know him know that they 
someday will address him as Dr. 
Fiorello. 

Tripping the light fantastic in an- 
other one of Joe's accomplishments. 
He belongs to the Kalozetean liter- 
ary society. * * * Borrows his room- 
mate's ties. * * * Relishes a trip to 
Trenton. * * * Smokes a pipe. * * * 
Reads everything and anything. * * * 
Is extremely partial to the fair sex 
and has curly hair. Naturally Joe 
will be missed next year. 



JOSEPHINE YAKE 



Reading from left to right we have 
none other than the versatile Miss 
Josephine Yake, at present a Sen- 
ior at Lebanon Valley College. Miss 
Yake is one of our South Hall girls, 
but she frequently finds occasion to 
visit her home in Lebanon. The rea- 
son may be found in a sumptious 
Buich that calls at her Hall occas- 
sionally. 

Miss Yake might also be termed 
the boop-boop-a-doop girl of L. V. C. 
as she is a warbler of note. However, 
her artistic ability is not confined to 
music alone as she is also at home 
with the pen and brush. Though her 
idealism has already been shown, 
she will continue to be idealistic and 
has chosen teaching as her vocation. 
Her major is French. 

'Jo' may seem a demure Miss upon 
first sight but just call her — Yake! 



"Pull! Pull! Pull" Slaves, hunks of 
meat, folly. Pull, pull — crash — con- 
fusion. The tug is over. We laugh. 
Fools usually do. 

A moral victory for the Fresh- 
men. But who should pay for the 
rope? Another pull? the taste has 
left us. There was an announcement 
in chapel. We will pull again. Have 
I not said we are ignorant. The team 
of fifteen appear. Four Sophomores 
arrive. Where are the others? A 
psychology trick? But they do not 
come. We seize the rope. It is ours. 

A piece of this rope hangs in my 
room. I will regard it as a precious 
trophy for a few years, then I will 
throw it into the ash heap where it 
belongs. 






On the Friday night, May 5, of 
1916 the Philo Literary Society cel- 
ebrated its forty-ninth anniversary. 
The program for the evening was, in 
accordance with Philo's custom, one 
of the best of its kind in both lit- 
erary and musical phases. 

The chapel was decorated with 
palms and Philo colors. The pro- 
gram consisted of four literary num- 
bers and tw musical numbers. The 
Philo orchestra was an entirely new 
feature on an anniversary program. 

The president's address of welcome 
was followed by the enlargement of 
the topic, "The New Temple of Civ- 
ilization." The speaker showed how 
a perfect "Temple" may be built only 
on peace. 

"The Links of Motherhood," was 
the title used for the following ora- 
tion. This having been during the 



war, the speaker emphasized the sac- 
rifice which mothers were called up- 
on to make. 

The third oration was a develop- 
ment of the subject "Americans for 
America." This revealed some amaz- 
ing facts in the line of immigra- 
tions. 

A reading, "The Renunciation of 
Jean Val Jean," taken from "Les 
iMiserables" was most effectively 
presented so that the audience felt 
as if the characters were present in 
person. 

The musical numbers consisted of 
a piano solo by Ray P. Campbell, 
and an octette. 

A reception was given in Philo 
Hall, folowing the program. 

o- 




May 3, 1919 the May Day exercis- 
es for that year were held. The 
Queen, Miss Anna Fasnocht of the 
class of '19, rode to her throne in a 
carriage. She was followed by her 
Maid of Honor, her attendants and 
those who participated in the dances. 

After she had alighted from her 
carrage and received her crown she 
gave an address. The theme chosen 
for this address was a plea for the 
alliviation of thes uffering of human- 
ity. Following her address she vvas 
presented with her foot stool, orb 
and scepter. 

Some small children then enter- 
tained the Queen with little dances- 
A folks dance by the Freshman and 
Sophomore girls followed and 
aesthetic dance by Edith Stager, ' 2 
found favor not only with the q ueen 
but also with all thes pectators. 

The last feature was the Ma>' 
Pole Dance, which always put a P ret 
ty ending to each May Day celebra- 
tion. 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, MAY 1, 1930. 



PAGE THREE 




"A COLLEGE JOKE TO CURE THE 'BLUES'" 

— Jonathan Swift. 



KAPPA LAMBDA SIGMA 



Dot Heister — I've got my shoes for May day. That's a load off my mind. 

—LVC— 

Sara — Where can I find Shellenberger ? 
Betty — Have you tried South Hall? 

— LVC— 

Dear Dawg-Gone: — 

I am engaged to a man with a wooden leg. What would you advise? 

Pining Penelope. 

" Ans. — Break it off. 

— LVC— 

CONCERNING THE SKIRT PROBLEM 

President Hoover — "You will have to excuse me. My administration is 
blamed for enough already." 

Prince of Wales — "I don't care whether they wear them long or short. 
I'm going on another lion hunt." 

Roger Babson — "I am with the shorts and have been ever since Oct." 

Hell V Maria Dawes— "Scat!" 

John Gilbert — "I think a skirt should be a skirt and not a puzzle." 
Girls, stand firm. The men are with you. Revolt! Fight! If you lose 
this battle it means: — 

1. Bustles. 

2. Corsets. 

3. Hair-rats. 

4. Feathered fans. 

5. Flannel petticoats. 

6. Balloon sleeves. 

7. Other calamities too numerous to mention. 

— LVC— 

Do you have "Light" in biology? 

Eulalie — No, it's pretty dark where I sit. 

— LVC— 

We may live without poetry, music, and art, 
We may live without conscience, and live without heart, 
We may live without friends, 
We may live without book, 
But a college student — 
Cannot live without cooks. 

— LVC— 

Never let a fool kiss you and lever let a kiss fool you! 
First Doctor — Did! you hold the mirror to her face to see if she was still 
bathing? 

Second Sawbones — Yes, and she opened one eye — gasped — and reached 
0r her powder puff. 

—LVC— 

A canner, exceedingly cannay, 
One morning remarked to his granny, 
"A canner can can 
Anything that he can 
But a canner can't can a can, can he?" 

—LVC— 

Ball and Chain — If I had known what a fool you were, I'd never have 
harried, you . 

Prisoner — You might have guessed it, dear, when I proposed to you. 

— LVC— 

EL IEVE IT OR NOT— 

° v e is like a photograph — it developes best in a dark room. 



M 



an y a true word is spoken between false teeth. 



ft en there was the absent-minded professor who kissed his pupils and 
l ed his wife. 

a *"y Ax thinks a stable compound is a place where they keep horses. 
^ ov e is like a peace of pie — a little crust and a lot of appelsauce. 



Despite the short time for prepa- 
ration the Kalozetean Literary Soci- 
ety presented a very interesting pro- 
gram at their regular meeting Fri- 
day evening, April 25. Devotions were 
led by the former chaplain Harry 
Zechman, due to the absence of Rob- 
ert Raudabush, the newly elected de- 
votional leader. Messrs. Williard and 
Speg once more favored their Kalo 
brothers with popular musical selec- 
tions played on their trusty string 
instruments. Their numbers were 
well played. L. V. C. may turn out a 
rival or two for "Ukulele" Ike in the 
near future — if the two gentlemen 
appear on many more society pro- 
grams. 

Russel E. Morgan gave a very in- 
teresting account of the happenings 
at the State Scientists' Convention 
held recently at Bloomsbuilg State 
Teachers' College. Mr. Morgan, who 
is well known in the Biological De- 
partment of the school upheld the 
high rating of that department by 
presenting a well prepared illustrated 
lecture on the "The Case of a Poly- 
dactylous Cat". Morton Early then 
started the "lighter" part of the pro- 
gram of good jokes along with a new 
Scotch story that had not yet reached 
the ears of our campus jokers who 
specialize in that type of humor. Al- 
fred E. Kuhnert, Kalo's big man of 
experience, delighted the audience 
with a very interesting account of the 
happenings during his Easter vaca- 
tion. Judging from his talk, "Ewalt" 
is a lover of nature and restaurants 
"where you can get all you can eat 
for fifty-cents." This closed the lit- 
erary part of the program after which 
a short business meeting was held. 



tempts of Great Women". After the 
presentation of the critic's carefuil^ 
worked-out report, the meeting ad- 
journed. 



PHI LAMBDA SIGMA 



The regular literary session ol 
Philo was held on Friday, April 11. 
After devotions were conducted b> 
Harry Zeck, the new president Edgai 
Hertzler, was installed by C. Pau. 
Barnhart. The literary program was-, 
opened with a talk on "Idealism ol 
American Music" by Warren Lebo. 
Fred W. Mund then gave a violin 
.solo, "A College Medly". "High Points 
in Freshman College Life" was tht. 
topic of an interesting talk by Cho.st- 
etr 0. Gooidhian. After the critic's 
report by William J. Myers, the meet- 
ing was adjourned. 



O 

KAPPA LAMBDA NU 



At Clio's business meeting on Fri- 
day, April 25. 1930, final plans for 
the Clio Circus were submitted. The 
circus will be held on Monday, May 
12. This event, which is held each 
year by the Clionian society, was o- 
mitted last year , and therefore ought 
to be of special interest - and amuse- 
ment to the students and people of 
the community. This year's circus 
promises to be the best ever given 
here. In additio nto a chariot race, 
acrobatics, minstrials, magicans, dan- 
ces, and various other attractions, 
an unusually fine side show will be 
a part o fthe intertainment Even 
Amos 'n Andy will be there — "Check 
and; Double Check." 

The Clio girls are quite enthusiastic 
about the circus, an dexpect it to be 
one of the gala events of the term. 

After the business meeting ,the 
Chairman of the Judiciary Commit- 
tee surprised the members of the 
society with the suggestion of sub- 
stituting fo rthe regular program an 
informal social hour. 

O 

DELTA LAMBDA SIGMA 



Philo gave a program in which all 
the members were extemporaneous 
on April 25. After devotions by Hai ry 
Zech, Rearich opened the literary 
program with a vivid description -)i 
the recent prison fire in Columbus, 
Ohio. Earl Wolk followed with some 
very pleasing piano selections. "Va- 
cation Times" was the topic given 
John Huges, and the resulting talk 
proved Mr. Huges' ability as a public 
speaker. 

Using the same topic "Vacation 
Times," Carl Myers gave a resume 
of his experiences. When Kenneth 
Waughtel was assigned the subject, 
"Dorm Life", he rose to the occassion 
and rendered a short pleasing talk. 
C. Paul Barnhart followed with an 
enlightening talk on "Things Which 
Might Take Place in the Graveyard." 
The program reached its climax and 
conclusion when Amos Knisely in his 
unassuming way spoke on "Who is 
the Most Popular Man on the Cam- 
pus, and Why Am I"? After the 
critic's report by Francis Barr, the 
meeting was declared 1 adjourned. 
O 



A very enjoyable program was 
rendered at the weekly meeting of 
Delphian, on Friday, Apr. 11. "Spring" 
and all its delightful aspects — the 
cool breezes, the warm sunshine, the 
refreshing showers, the budding trees, 
the blooming flowers, and the return- 
ing birds — was the theme of the even- 
ing's intertainment. 

The Chaplain, opened the devotions 
with a song, "Showers of Blessing". 
A vocal solo. "Tis Morning", was then 
delightfully given by a Delphian song 
bird, Hester Thompson. The next 
number, an original poem by Ruth 
Cooper, entitled "Voices of Spring", 
was entertainingly read by the poet- 
ess. Bits of sunshine were also scat- 
tered in the form of several hum- 
oi*ous selections presented by Bernita 
Strebig. A piano solo, "To a Wood 
Aenomene", was then skillfully ren- 
dered by Elva Reigle. A concluding 
number was an interesting talk given 
by Mary Snyder on the "Early At- 




Mr. N. B. Thomas of the class of 
'12 has recently been elected Super- 
intendent of the Harrisburg Schools, 
Harrisburg, Penna. Mr. Thomas for- 
merly hel da position in the schools 
at Williamsport Md. 

Henry T. Wilt, '26 has recently 
received a position as head of the 
Latin Department in the high school 
in Westhampton, Long Island, New 
Yory. Since his graduation from L. 
V. Mr. Wilth has been teaching in 
the Wyoming High School, Woyming 
Pennsylvania. 

Samuel Meyer '28 has been elected 
to teach mathematics in the Senior 
High School in West Orange, New 
Jersey. Mr. Meyer has been teaching 
in the High School at SomeiKdlle, 
New Jersey, since his graduation from 
here. 

At a recent meeting of the Ohio 
State Economics Association Miss 
Lena May Hoeuner ,of the class ol 
1910, who fo rthe last five years has 
been professor of Home Economics 
at Otterbien College, Westernville, 
Ohio, was elected National Councilor 
o fthe Ohio State Association for a 
ter mof three years. She will attend 
the meetings o fthe National Asso- 
ciation at Denver the last week in 
June. Professor Hoerner who has 
been chairman of the Membership 
Committee o fthe state organization 
was reappointed for the fifth time to 
that office at the meeting in Cleve 
I land where she submitted ; a report on 



the transactions of the last National 
meeting held at Boston last summer. 

The following papers were present- 
ed by alumni of Lebanon Valley ,at 
the meeting of the Pennsylvania A- 
cadmy of Science, April 18 & 19 at 
Bloom sburg where the sixth annual 
meeting was held at the State Teach- 
ers College: 

"A Polydactylous Cat"— Russel 
Morgan '31. 

"Twinnin gin Chick Embryos" Stel- 
la M. Hughes, '25. 

"Effects of Nematocysts of Hydra 
on Amphipsods" — Wm. Hudson Beh- 
ney, '25. 

"Two-headed Snakes," — V. Earl 
Ligt, '16. 

"A Natural Graft between Unre- 
lated Species, Quercus rubra and 
Prunus arium." — S. Hoffman Derick- 
son, '2. 

The next annual meeting will be 
held at Harrisburg. 

Mr. A. Pass Bollinger, '28 teacher 
of Biology in the High School at Co- 
lumbia, Penn., stopped in town to 
call on friends while spending the 
week-end on a botanizing tour of 
Lebanon County. 

Mr .and Mrs. Myrl Brown and 
daughter Myrle Gertrude visited 
friends in Annville on Saturday after 
responding to a call in a near-by 
city where Mr. Brown is wanted as 
a teacher an dcoach. Mr. Brown has 
been teaching biology and Algebra 
and coaching athletics in the high 
school at Downingtown since his 
graduation in 1928. He will be re- 
membered by baseball fans as a 
pitcher for Springfield, Mass. in the 
Eastern league where he will again 
twirl the pill the coming season. Mrs. 
Brown will be remembered as Kath- 
ryn Harris, '17. 

Mr. Paul E. Witmeyer, '16 who has 
since 1923 served as Superintendent 
o fschools in Columbia has recently 
accepted a similar position in Sha- 
mokin. 

In the list of officers of the various 
sections o fthe Southern Division of 
the Pennsylvania State Educational 
Association, which held its spring 
meetin gat Lancaster April 11th & 
12th, we note the names of Mr. 
Charless Gemmil, '18, Secretary of 
the mathematics group and Dr. 0. E. 
Reynolds, chairman of the college 
group. 

Professor S. O. Grimm, '12, attend- 
ed the meetings of the National As- 
sociation of College Registrars at 
Memphis, Tennesssee. 

Mr. Uhl R. Kuhn '28, has recently 
been married and accepted a position 
as an inspector at the international 
bridge on the Rio Grande at Laredo. 
Texas. He writes that he is enjoying 
his work and with his usual enthusi- 
asm and spirit of cooperation is col- 
lecting natural history specimens for 
the science departments of his Alma 
Mater. 

At North Carolina State College, 
a recent ruling is that for each class 
cut fifty cents fine is collected. Some 
of us would become bankrupt in no 
time! 

-o- 



A recent straw vote ballot cast in 
"The Stute" reads like this: 

1. Are you in favor of anything? 

2. Do you like anything? 

3. Are you a Republican or a the- 

tre-goer ? 

4. What could you do with five 

bucks ? 

5. Do you think? 

6. Why? 

7. Who are you and when? 

8. If you drank Scotch, would you 

make a rye face? 

9. Do you like beer? (or Beer- 

straum ? ) 

10. Who do you expect to work after 

you graduate? 

11. What do you expect to get? 

(besides abuse) 

12. How long will it be before you 

are famous? Or infamous? 

13. Why are you the way you are? 

Don't answer if unnecessary. 



PAGE FOUR 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, MAY 1, 1930. 



(Continued from Page One) 



DOUBLE DEFEAT 

OPENS SEASON 



LEBANON 


VALLEY 








ab 


r 


h 


Shortridge, rf 


3 


1 


1 


Light, 2b 


3 


2 


1 


Albright, cf 


2 


1 


2 


Stewart, ss 


4 


2 


2 


Daubs, If 


4 





1 


Patrizia, p 


3 


1 





Heller, c 


4 





2 


Dennis, lb 


3 





1 


Jacks, 3b 


3 








Bovino, p 


1 








Wood, p 











Totals 


30 


7 


10 


F., & 


M. 








ab 


r 


h 


Sponsler, If 


4 


1 


1 


Hershey, ss 


4 


1 


1 


Mayloff, lb 


5 


1 


1 


Smober, rf 


3 








Horst, 2b 


5 


1 





Johnson, If 


2 








Darlington, 3b 


4 


2 





Webber, c 


2 


1 


1 


Clark, p 


1 








Texler, x 











Totals 


30 


8 


4 



x Ran for Mazloff in sixth. 
L. V. 1 1 3 2 7 
F.&M. 10 14 1 1—8 
Two-base hits: Albright, DaUbs, 
Shortlidge, Stewart. Base on balls 
Off Clark, 3; off Patrizio, 5; off Bo- 
vino, 5. Struck out, By Clark, 2; by 
Patrizio, 3; by Bovino, I. Passed 
balls, Heler, 2. Losing pitcher, Wood 
Umpire, Ruth. 

LEBANON VALLEY 

ab r 



Shortlidge, If 
Light, 2b 
Albright, cf 
Stewart, ss 
Nye, ss 
Bartolet, rf 
Patrizio, p 
Woof 1 , p 
Daub, p 
Heller, c 
Mm*phy, c 
Dennis, lb 
Jacks, 3b 



Totals 



36 

PENN STATE 

ab 



French, If 
Livezev, ss 
Diedrich, cf 
Drill, 2b 
F^ltzman, c 
Hobbs, rf 
Yong, lb 
Musser, 3b 
Stokes, p 
Fry, p 
Debonis, p 
Helfs, 2b 



r 
3 
3 
2 

2 
1 
2 
2 
1 






Dickens. We circle every town and 
extotionate not for advertisement. 
O 

More than 10,000 students from 101 
countries and dependencies are study- 
ing American instutitions of higher 
learning according to the latest cen- 
sus for 1928-29. More than 3,000 
students came from China, Japan, 
and Koreato receive Eastern educa- 
tion. Most of these students are re- 
quired to return and contribute to. 
the rebuilding process. Chinese edu- 
cators voice the belief that Chinese 
students educated in America are dis- 
contented when they return to China 
and have difficulty in rendering an 
effective service to the country be- 
cause they lack definite understand- 
ing of their homeland situation. 

One of the interesting shifts in 
student migration since the war is 
that Germany now sends 360 students 
to the U. S. A. whereas formerly she 
sent practically none. 



Fine assortment of Watches, Rings, 

Chains, & etc. 
New Century Chiming Grandfather 
Clocks 

LIGHT'S JEWELRY STORE 
51 West Main St. 



THE PENNWAY 
BARBER SHOP 

N. M. RAUSCH, Prop. 
Annvill*, Pa. 



HOFFMAN STEAM PRESS- 
ING 

KEYSTONE HAT CLEANING 

STEVE WORMS 

10 W. Main St Annvill*. Pa. 



M. H. SMITH 

JEWELER 

Watches at Lowest Prices 
Watch and Clock Repairing 
38 Railroad St. Annville, Pa, 



PHOTOGRAPHS 



LIVE FOREVER 



PIANOS 

PLAYER PIANOS 

PLAYER ROLLS 
VICTOR RADIOS 

ViCTROLAS 

VICTOR RECORDS 
SHEET MUSIC 



i 

i 

I Miller Music Store 

738 Cumberland Street 
Lebanon, Pa. 



i 

Ulricas Studio I 

820 Cumberland St. 



FOR RENT 

Furnished Apartment or Rooms for 
married or single students during the 
coming year. For particulars see 

MRS. GEO. HEILMAN, 
457 E. Main St., Annville, Pa. 



PRINTING 




PUBLICATION, 
BOOKS, CATA 
LOGUES, STATION- 
ERY, CARDS, TAGS, 

LNNYILLE PRINTING 
COMPANY 

ANNVILLE PA. 



Totals 44 16 18 

L. V. 01000100 0—2 
P. S. 1 10 2 3 x-16 

Two-base hits-Bartolt, Musser. 
Shortlidge, Drill, Diedrich, Saltzman 
Stokes. Three-base hits-Hobbs. Hime 
runs-Musser. Struck out-By Stokes, 
3;Daub, 3; Wood, 2; Fry, 2; Debonis, 
2;Patrizio, 1; Base on balls-Off Fry, 
6; Daub, 4; Wocd, 1; Patrizio, 1; De- 
bonis, 1. Winning itcher, Stokes. Los- 
ing pitcher, Patriz'io. Umpire, Gair. 
_0 



BEYOND THE CAMPUS 



The following notice appeared in 
an Orintal newspaper which devotes 
part of its space to matters in Eng- 
lish: "The news of English we tell 
the latest. Writ in perfect style and 
most earlist. Do a murder commit, 
we hear of it and tell it. Do a mighty 
chief die, we publish it and in bor- 
ders somber. Staff as each been col- 
leged and write like Kipling and the 



E. J. SNAVELY AND COMPANY 

UMBRELLAS, LUGGAGE and SPORTING GOODS 
ATHLETIC EQUIPMENT 
628 Cumberland St. 
LEBANON. PENNA. 



PARKER FOUNTAIN PENS 

GUARANTEE D FOR LIFE 
Two Pens in One— A Desk Pen and a Pocket Pen. 
Ask To See Them. 

ESBENSHADE'S BOOK STORE 

38 N. 8th St. -:- -:- Lebanon, Pa. 



CLOTHING O F QUALITY 

J S BASEHORE 

Lebanon, Pa. 



Shaeffer's Lifetime Pens — 

NONE BETTER ABSOLUTELY GUARANTEED 

AN EVERYDAY NECESSITY FOR 
COLLEGE STUDENTS 

TT A TJ 1>1?T *C The Gift ^ tore °* Lebano» 
nAI\ri!yL a 757.759 Cumberland Streat 



H W MILLER 



Annvilh 



HARDWARE 
OF QUALITY 



Pa. 



PRINTING 

When you want work 
of the better kind see 

HIESTER— The Printer 



J. P BERLEW 

DEPARTMENT STORE 

Two Doors From Post Office 

Invites your inspection of 
General Merchandise 



ARTISTS SUPPLIES 

Canvas, Parchment, Japanese Tissue, 
Fabriano White and Grey Charcoal 
Papers, Whatman's Hot and Cold- 
pressed Papers, Oil, Water and 
Decora Colors, Brushes, Atomizers, 
China Palettes, Drawing Boards, Col- 
ored Crayons and Pencils. 

All high grade materials 

BOLLMANS 

33 South Eighth Street, 
Lebanon, Pa. 



D. L SAYLOR & SONS 

Contractors 

LUMBER AND COAL 

ANNVILLE. PA. 



TRY OUR HOME MADE 
SANDWICHES 

QUALITY LUNCH 

BREYER'S ICE CREAM 
A Specialty 

7 E. Main St. Annville, p. 




For Quality 

Baked Products 



Patronize 



FINK'S BAKERY 

Main Street 



TENNIS SUPPLIES 

RACKETS AND TENNIS 
BALLS 

at Moderate Prices 
We restring your old Racket's 



COLLEGE BOOK STORE 



For 

QUALITY PLUS 

in 

Material and Workmanship 
Repairs at Special Rates 
Go To 

ANNVILLE SHOEMAN 
207 W. Main 




HOUSE OF GOOD 



Wm. Penn Highway 
Near Annville 



Meals Served at All Hours 

BANQUETS AND PARTIES 
Our Specialty 



KREAMER BROS. 



STEINITE RADIOS 
EASY ELECTRIC WASHE R 
COLUMBIA GAS STOVES AND RANGES 
RUGS AND LINOLEUMS 

"House of Better Values" 
FURNITURE AND UNDERTAKING 

328 W. Mam St. p hon e 6R3 




DON'T FORGET A BOX OF WHITMANS CHOCOLATES 



MOTHER'S DAY 

THE PENNWAY 

OPPOSITE P. O. 
A FULL LINE OF FRESH PASTRY DAILY 



GOING TO 
THE DICKINSON GAME 
SATURDAY? 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



LET'S GO! 
CLIO CIRCUS 
MONDAY 



VOLUME VI 



ANNVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA, THURSDAY, MAY 8, 1930. 



No. 6. 



PERFECT WEATHER LENDS ADDED CHARM 
TO COLORFUL MAY DAY FESTIVITIES 

PAGEANT BASED UPON UNIQUE SYMBOLISM JOINS 
WITH STRIKING COSTUMES TO DELIGHT 
LARGE AUDIENCE 



As a perfect May Day crept out 
of the east on Saturday, May 3, the 
campus became a rendezvous for 
friends, relatives and alumni meet- 
ing here to see the annual coronation 
of the queen of the May. This year 
Miss Hilda Hess reigned as queen 
over the ephemeral realm and its 
festivities. Miss Leah Miller was 
Maid of Honor and the Misses Dor- 
othy Heister, Ruth Cooper, Josephine 
Yake, Olive Weigle, Bernita Strebig 
and Mary McCurdy were attendants 
in the May Queen's court. 

From Mother Nature's own cycle 
came the inspiration for the theme 
of this year's festivities. In the pag- 
eant, written asd directed by Miss 
Louise G. Feneil, directress of phys- 
ical education, the numbers had been 
so gracefully interwoven as to form 
a shimmering web of symbolism. 
The first episode depicted the reign 
of King Winter with his subjects 
Rain, Snow, Icicles and Wind danc- 
ing before him. His power is un- 
disputed amid this revelry until the 
messenger of Spring arrives. The 
cruel king frowns as this dainty but 
hardy spirit announces to him that 
his reign is over and Spring is com- 
mg. He refuses to abdicate his 
throne. As the Spirit of Spring, she 
who will be crowned Queen of the 
May, and her train of folowers ap- 
proach the throne, King Winter feels 
his power waning and departs. 

In the second episode the Spirit of 
Spring is vested with full power over 
the whole world as she is crowned 
Queen of the May. Some of the. 
^ay Queen's sprightly subjects— the 
bu "ds, butterflies and flower*— hold/ 
their revels before the Queen's throne 
^ did the gloomy subjects of King 
Winter previously. 



LIFE WORK RECRUITS 

ARE STILL ACTIVE 



The Life Work Recruits have two 
J 101 ^ visits to their credit. On Sun- 
a y> April 27, they took charge of tlie 
. • E. program at St. Paul Evangel- 
co i Churcih > Lebanon. Ruth Agen 
^ducted the meeting. The main 
^ e atu res Q £ p r0 g ram were> two 

and clarinet duets by Fred 

solo** an( * ** arry Zec k> a mandolin 
tali! ^ Gretna Drawbaugh, and a 
«■ on "What Is a Useful Life" by 
ed Er nenheiser. Ruth Coble piay- 
p,-,^ ne Piano for solos and congre- 
8a *°»al singing. 

and n Sunday, May 4, Ruth Cooper 
the <F re< * F un d gave addresses at 
Second U. B. Church, of Pal- 
tH e a ; *t being a C. E. anniversary 
tihe program was one that 

^Und l6d to youn & people. Fred 
Y J? s P°ke on the theme, "Wanted, 
U Se . For Christ", and Ruth Cooper 
% J 0V her topic, "The Christ of 
^ttniaan Way". 



The final episode shows the nations 
a stately court minuet, a senior group 
of Nature. The French appear with 
of the world celebrating the rebirth 
dance. A group of Sophomores ana 
Freshmen girls give a true aesthetic 
touch to the pageant in a dance sym 
boiizing the budding of Nature. A 
band of Russians, freshmen girls, en 
certain the court with the gay, quick 
steps of a Russian Mazurka while 
the freshmen boys give a lilting sail- 
ers hornpipe. Lads and lassies in the 
kilts of Highland clans djance the 
Highland Fling as the sophomore 
contribution to the May Day festivity. 
The juniors give the traditional may 
pole dance. 

The jester, Walter Krumbeigle, was 
always on hand to pick dandelions for 
the Queen and her attendants and to 
confuse the dancers with his absurd 
mimicry of their intricate steps. 

Much of the success of May Day 
is due to the untiring efforts of Miss 
Sara Ensminger, president of the 
Y. W. C. A. The success as a whole 
is undoubtly due to the splendid' co- 
operation of faculty and students 
who gave their services and sugges- 
tions.. 

o- 



LOCALS AVENGE 



F. & M. DEFEAT 



DAUB BAGS FIRST 
DIAMOND VICTORY 
OF SEASON 



Lebanon Valley took a nice victory 
over Franklin and Marshall College 
by a score of 8-3 on Fonday. Daub 
pitched a good game for the home 
team while his teammates hit and 
fielded well back of him. The fea- 
ture of the game was Albright's 
home run in the fifth. 

Lebanon Valley got off to a two 
run lead in the first inning when 
with two outs, F. and M.'s infield 
went to pieces. Light's high fly that 
the wind blew away from the first 
baseman drove in the two runs. 

F. and M. came right back and 
scored a run in each of the second, 
third and fifth innings. Their lead 
was shortened however for Albright's 
home run came with Shortlidge on 
base. A double by Stewart and a 
single by Light brought in another 
run in that inning. 

In the sixth, successive hits by 
Dennis, Myrphy, Shortlidge, and 
Patrizio counted for three more runs 
and put the game on ice. 

Daub pitched effectively allowing 
only three hits and striking out four 
men. He put himself in trouble by 
issuing seven passes and hitting a 
(Continued on Page Four) 



GLEE CLUB RENDERS 

FINAL CONCERT 



The Men's Glee Club gave its finai 
concert in the Engie Conservatory on 
the evening of May 3. 

The program was altered slightly 
because Mr. Barnes was unable to 
play his usual trumpet solo, and be- 
cause Mr. Jacks, having had a finger 
hurt in the Penn State baseball game 
was unable to accompany the club. 
Miss Mildred Myers played an organ 
solo in Mr. Barnes stead, while Miss 
Weigle accompanied the club and its 
soloists. 

The program was enjoyed by all 
who heard it and it is hoped that the 
club in the future keeps up the fine 
it has done in the past. 

U 

iliTM¥f1 MmT fU\A 



PHILOS NEW AND OLD MEET TO WITNESS 
BRILLIANT CELEBRATION OF ANNIVERSARY 

j PRESENTATION OF "SEVEN KEYS TO BALDPATE " 
ACCLAIMED AS AN OUTSTANDING DISPLAY 
OF DRAMATIC ABILITY 



TWO MORE MATCHES 



PALMYRA CLUB AND 
ELIZABETHTOWN 
ARE HUMBLED 



Lebanon Valley's tennis team 
scored a 9-0 victory over the Pal- 
myra Club on May Day. In this 
match Prof. Stevenson and Foster; 
Ulrich played for Palmyra. 

Prof. Stevenson playing against 
Hertzler furnished the best game in 
the singles. Stevenson took the firfet 
set 6-1, but Hertzler came back and 
won the next two 6-1, 8-6 after a 
hard fight. Fink took Ulrich across 
without much trouble 6-2, 6-2. 

Shroyer won from Frye, Palmyra, 
6-1, 6-1. Dunmoyer beat Evans, 
Palmyra, 7-5, 6-3. Rank beat D. 
Kreider, Palmyra, 6-4, 6-4, and Mil- 
ler defeated! I. Kreider, Palmyra, 
6-4, 6-3. 

The doubles were harder fought 
affairs. All of them went three sets 
before they were decided. Shroyer 
and Hrtzler defeated Frye and! Stev- 
enson 6-2, 3-6, 6-3. Rank and Hut- 
chinson beat Ulrich and I. Kreider 

5- 7, 6-3, 6-1. Dunmoyer and Fink 
won from D. Kreider and Evans 6-2, 
1-6, 7-5. 

ELIZABETHTOWN LOSES 

The tennis team of Lebanon Val- 
ley continued' its winning streak by 
conquering Elizabeth College 6-0. 

Shroyer scored an easy victory 
over his man, Dieter 6-3, 6-1. Hertz- 
ler found the going tough but emerg- 
ed with a victory in straight sets 
over C. Wenger 6-4, 9-7. Dunmoyer 
had easy sailing and won from J. 
Wenger 6-0, 6-0. Fink had an off- 
day and dropped 1 a set. He won from 
E. Wenger 6-2, 4-6, 6-3. 

Shroyer and Hertzler scored a vic- 
tory over C. Wenger and J. Wenger 

6- 4, 8-6 while Dunmoyer and Fink 
beat E. Wenger and Dieter 6-4, 7-9, 
6-1. 



Again Philo has celebrated her 
anniversary in a most noteworthy 
and successful way. Under the lead- 
ership of the president, J. Calvin 
Keene, and with each committee ef- 
ficiently working under his personal 
supervision, the Sixty-third Anniver- 
sary of the birth of the oldest 
society on the campus was observed 
on Friday, May 2. The most out- 
standing item on the program was 
the presentation of "Seven Keys to 
Baldpate" by George M. Cohan. 

Select music at the opening of the 
program and between the acts was 
rendered by an orthophonic Victrola. 
The invocation was given by the Rev. 
Franklin Ernenheiser, '01, a Philo in 
the active ministry. Following this, 
J. Calvin Keene delivered the presi- 
dent's address. In his short talk he 
welcomed, the Faculty, Alumni, and 
friends of the society. In closing he 
extended a cordial invitation to all to 
attend a reception to be given in 
Philo Hall. J. Robert Eshleman, one 
of the most talented musicians on 
the campus then rendered two tfe- 
ligntful piano selections, "Valse 
Triste" by Sibelius, and "Polich- 
inelle" by Rachmaninoff. 

The Play 

Fifteen years ago, more or less, a 
box offce somewhere on Broadway 
was stampeded by theatre-goers anx- 
ious to see George M. Cohan's lat- 
est play, "Seven Keys to Baldpate." 
It was described as a "mysterious 



ALBRIGHT SUSTAINS 
DECIDED DEFEAT 



o 

DEBATE CANCELLED 

The debate with St. Thomas 
schedued for Friday night, May 9, 
has been cancelled, according to tlie 
report of Miss Hilda Hess.the man- 
ager. 



L. V. STARS WALK AWAY 
WITH ANCIENT 
RIVALS 



On Wednesday, April 30 Albright's 
tennis team fell before Lebanon Val- 
ley's attack 7-0. All the Lebanon 
Valley men were in form and Al- 
bright could offer little resistance. 

Shroyer defeated McCarrol, Al- 
bright inan easy manner 6-2, 6-1. 
Hertzler 1 and Dunmoyer found the 
opposition even easier and each one 
turned in two love sets. Hertzler's 
opponent was Carney and Dunmoyer 
played against Home. Rank defeat- 
ed Teele, Albright, 6-1, 6-2 while 
Fink disposed of Hangen, Albright 
6-3, 6-1. 

With victory certain, Lebanon Val- 
ley took things easy in the doubles 
matches. Shroyer and Hertzler beat 
McCarrol and Home 6-4, 6-4. The 
other doubles match produced Al- 
bright's only victories set as Dun- 
moyer and Hutchinson won from 
Carney and Hangen 6-3, 2-6, 6-1. 



melodrama" and became instantly 
one of Broadway's "best sellers". 
With Mr. Cohan it had become al- 
most an instinct to know what the 
general public liked, for he had been 
on the stage since he was nine years 
of age. One of the little tricks he 
had learned early was that people 
like to experience the emotions of 
terror and' fear, and yet know that 
after al it is only Make-Believe. 

This play within a play, given by 
the society as the feature of its 
sixty-third anniversary, provides an 
abundance of terror and excitement. 
Just as the audience is certain that 
the cunning of a politician and the 
hypocricy of a respectable citizen 
are to be exposed and the neck of a 
young homicide is doomed, Mr. Co- 
han bursts his buble of mystery by 
showing that the plot is nothing 
more than the visualizing of a story 
which a young novelist is writing. 

The cast were unusualy well adapt- 
ed to their roles. After a good per- 
formance the common opinion fre- 
quently circulates here that this ac- 
tor and that actress "were splendid 
but merey acting natural." How- 
ever, that is one of the best criti- 
( Continued on Page 3) 



-0- 



STUDENTS PRESENT 
OPENING RECITAL 



ANNUAL SPRING SERIES 
OFFERS PLEASING 
ENTERTAINMENT 



Threestudents of the L. V. Con- 
servatory, Margaret Young, organ 
Dorothy Haldeman, Piano, and Hes- 
terThompson, Soprano, appeared in a 
charming spring recital in Engle 
Hall Tuesday evening. The perfor- 
mers won the hearty applause of a 
large and interested audience. 

Miss Young, the organist of the 
Lutheran Church in Annville, opened 
the program with a sonata in the 
style of Handel. The Bonn Scherzo 
gave her intunity to display o light 
varied tone color, while the Festi- 
val Toccato brought the program to 
a fitting chimax. 

Miss Haldeman presented a wide 
expanse of tone color. The first 
movement of the MacDowell Sonato 
demands a technic with a deep emo- 
tional background, while the "Ara- 
besque" by Debussy brought forward 
the lighter qualities of the player. 

The American composer was well 
represented in a most varied style 
in Miss Thompson's singing. She 
possesses a voice of fine dramatic 
quality and sang with clear diction 
and fine interpretation. She was 
accompanied! by Miss Goshert. 



PAGE TWO 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, MAY 8, 1930. 



ESTABLISHED 1925 



A wa«kly publication by the Under* 
rraduate Students of Lebanon 
Valley College 



EDITORIAL STAFF 

Russel Etter, '31 Editor-in-Chief 

Ruth Liller, '31 Associate Edito 

R. Roudabush, '31 .... Associate Editor 
R .Morgan, '31 .... Managing Editor 



BEPOETOEIAL STAFP 

Robert Eshleman, '31 

Madeline Sheddy, '31 

Ruth Shroyer, '32 

Hilda Buckley, '32 

Walter Krumbeigel, '33 

General Reporter 

Mary Goshert, '32 Conservatory 

Robert Rawhouser, '32 Athletic 

Dorothy Garber, '32 Clioniaa 

Mary Epply, '32 Delphian 

Percy Clements, '33 Kalozetean 

Fred Mund, '32 Philokosmian 

Edna Early, '31 .... Alumni Reporter. 

BUSINESS STAP7 

G. Becker, '31 .... Business Manager 
P. Keene, '32 Asst. Business Manager 
C. Wise, '31 .... Circulation Manager 



FACULTY ADVISORS 

Dr. Paul A. W. Wallace, .English Dept. 
Miss Mary K. Wallace, li,ngiisn Uept, 
Or. Paul S. Wagner, Math, jjepc, 

LA VIE CULLiEGILNJNIK, a member 
of the Intercollegiate ^Newspaper Aasu 
ciation or the Middle Atlantic states. 



Single Copies 11/ cents 

.Subscription . $1.00 per year 

.Entered at the Annville, ra., post- 
oftice as seconu class matter unuer tne 
Act of March 3, 18 m. 



PLAYS 



The success of the recent Philo 
play brings to our attencion a sub- 
ject frequently discussed among some 
of the students, the advisability of 
permitting the students to coacn their 
own plays. With the exception of 
the choice of the cast and the prelim- 
inary direction, provided for by Dr. 
Wallace, head ot the .Department oi 
English, the play was entirely coach- 
ed by the cast itself. A large meas- 
ure of credit is undoubtedly due to 
L»r. Wallace tor his services in these 
capacities, nor are we endeavoring 
to minimize m any way the value of 
the efforts put forth by the various 
professors m attempting to produce 
a higher type of dramatics. We sim- 
ply feel that the time has come for 
the students to take a larger part in 
the management of such affairs and 
to relieve the professors of at least 
a part of the burden which they en- 
tail. 

We would not attempt to main- 
tain that the outcome of such studen: 
projects would' be of a quality equal 
to the product of experienced coach- 
es. There would be a great many 
more of the "rough edges", perhaps 
a slightly less polished technique. But 
all that would be lost in the way of 
perfection in these lines would be am- 
ply regained in the form of an In- 
creased self-reliance on the part of 
the students themselves. 

We are frequently made to think 
that this is the very point at which 
our present educational system is 
weakest. Students (even those of 
higher institutions) are proficient in 
following the directions of some 
leader, but when it comes to tack- 
ling their own problems they fln<* 
themselves at a total loss to know 
just how to begin. To live our own 
lives in our own way— this is the 
problem we all must face sooner or 
later. If we are not properly equip- 
ped for this task, we simply are not 
educated in the proper sense of the 
word 1 . 

We do not advocate the production 
of a crowd of "know-it-alls" and 
ultra-snobs. We do not recommend 
the abolition of all faculty super- 
vision of extra-curricular activities; 
that would not be the part of wis- 



dom. We merely suggest that in the 
case 01 student piays at least, it 
would be profitable to reduce sucn 
supervision to the minimum, profit- 
able both to students and faculty. 

U ■ 

THE CARNEGIE TESTS 



During the present week, a number 
of schools and colleges thoroughout 
cne country, including Lebanon Val- 
ley college, are submitting to their 
sopnomores a series of tests iur- 
msned by the carnegia foundation 
xor tne Advancement 01/ leaching, 
xnese tests cover tne major part ox 
the regular curricumm and include 
examination for general intelligence 
as wen as the inxormationai contest 
of scfiooi courses. They are very 
thorough in their way, and from an 
lruormationai standpoint are evcep- 
cionaliy rigorous. 

xhe results ox these tests, both at 
Lebanon Valley and at other schoois, 
are, 01; course, still unknown, but 
chey are expected: to furnish a great 
ueai of helpful information to stu- 
dents of proxessionai education and 
to shed considerable light on a great 
many present-day problems in that 
Held, chief among them is the ques- 
tion as to the thoroughness 01 the 
training furnished by the Hign 
School anidi the first two years oi 
college work from the standpoint of 
information. Such an abhorance have 
we moderns contracted for the old 
method 01 mere memory — stuffing 
that we have allowed the pendulum 
to swing t the other extreme, ac- 
cording to many students of edu- 
cation, and in consequence have neg- 
lected the acquisition of knowledge 
that is absolutely needed as a basis 
for future training. Although these 
fundamental facts merely serve as 
cools with which the students must 
later work, they are essential, and 
tneir absence serves as a positive 
crawback in the farther education of 
the individual. 

Whether these contentions are 
based on fact is of course a debatable 
question, it is hoped that the results 
of the Carnegie Tests will go far 
toward solving it. And if there is a 
lack of the proper type of proceedure 
during these important years in the 
school-life of the individual, it is 
hoped that a reorganization will be 
etiected that will at least furnish 
the student wh enters college with 
the information which the imo^st 
brilliant frequently lacks. 

O 

LET'S BUCKLE DOWN 



FROSH THOUGHTS 



"Ho, hum! Gee, how sleepy I am! 
Isn't this , abominable weather? I 
can't do a thing." 

Sounds familiar, does it? Weil, 
if you were a prof., a student man- 
ager, a society president, a committee 
chairman or the humble and much- 
trod-upon editor of the La Vie it 
would sound still more familiar and 
much more disconcerting. For that 
is supposed to be considered an am- 
ple apology for delayed reports, over- 
due copy, and all sorts of unfinish- 
ed tasks. 

Now between you and me and the 
door post, as the saying goes, this 
spring fever excuse has been worn so 
thin that a bat couldi see through it 
at noonday. Of course it feels fine 
to spread oneself over a goodly part 
of the campus and doze off under the 
cool shade of a maple. And a walk 
about town or along the Quittie with 
the "one and only" has all the lectures 
stopped! we ever listened to. But 
there is a certain amount of work 
that must be done, weather or no 
weather, and, YOU are the one who 
must do it. 

-So Let's Buckle Down. 



THE BIG CITY 



"Dang! Dang! Honk! Honk! 
Rumble! Bumble!", street-cars ele- 
vated trains, subways and automo- 
biles, all rushing, always rushing, 
hither and thither, stopping and 
starting, going who knows where? 
This is New York, the largest city in 
the world, interesting and unusual. 

Let us walk along Broadway at 
about five o'clock in the evening, the 
time which is commonly known as 
the "rush hour". The elevated trains 
rumble overhead stopping only for an 
instant to discharge or take on pas- 
sengers. About twenty taxi-cabs 
speed on the street, dodging 
in and out among the other 
vehicles in order to make better time. 
A trolley-car stops, many people get 
off', but no sooner have they left 
when it is again filled with new oc- 
cupants. The subway entrances are 
crowded. It seems as though every- 
one wishes to get in, and at the same 
time, some want to get out. What 
a congested place this is; not much 
fun here. 

We stroll along until we reach 
Times Square. Here, it seems, the 
whole world has gathered and is in 
an awful rush from one place to an- 
other, pushing and shoving each 
other in their efforts to make haste. 
They pour from the buildings and 
rush for some means of transporta- 
tion. Traffic officers blow their 
whistles trying to keep some sort of 
order. The automobiles are forced 
to stop in order that the pedestrian 
may cross the street in safety. They 
are, however, off at the signal as the 
policeman's whistles shrieks out its 
warning to those unfortunate ones 
who have not yet reached the other 
side of the street. It seems that no 
time can be wasted and yet through 
it all more time is lost than if things 
were taken a little more slowly. This 
is the b'g city at its busy moments. 
What sort cf life is this? Death and 
danger lurk at every street corner 
as the cars speed recklessly onward. 
Who knows but in their haste people 
may p^rh scmecne to his doom be- 
neath th° grinding wheels of the sub- 
way. Who knows if he or she may 
not be shoved .down the stairs of t:ie 
elevated train bridge as the people 
rush to some other destination. This 
is the life in the metropolis. 

Now let us see what it holds in 
store for us in the wee hours of tne 
morning. We will walk along the 
ssme street at three o'clock in the 
morning. The elevated-trains still 
rumble over-head but only an occa- 
sional vehicle speeds by on the road 
beneath. Very few people pass us. 
The huge, dark shadows of the ele- 
vated posts loom out of the gloom 
like huge giants lurking in the dark- 
ness. The shops and stores are closed 
and dark. A policeman on night duty 
Ftrolls leisurely along whistling to 
himself the tune of "Sweet Rosey 
O'Grady" or the "Sidewalks of New' 
York". As we walk on we come in?o 
the glare f some large arc light, 
then all is darkness again as we 
pass beyond the glow of its bright 
rays. It is much different now, for 
the big city sleeps and the buildings 
seem to nod in peaceful slumber as 
they loom up and up into the dark- 
ness. The fast pace of the daytime 
has tired the bodies of the people 
They sleep only t prepare them- 
selves for the next day when they 
shall again resume their speedy 
life. 

There is still another phase of life 
in the big city, and that is when it 
is at play. They have their own 
'c'eas for amusing themselves. We 
cannot deny them the right to enjoy 
themselves but let us look at their 
ways of amusement. We, now, stand 
before the large, majestic, Para- 




HARRY W. ZECHMAN 



Among our seniors, we have with 
us a man who has been one of the 
hardest workers for the college, class 
and' society, Mr. Harry Zechman. He 
is an ertremely conscientious worker 
and it is seldom that he pauses to 
jest though it lies within his power. 

Harry is majoring in History and 

has chosen the ministry as his life's 
work. At present, though still at- 
tending school he is preaching at 
Brunnerville. 

Also Hary is one of the few who 
does not borrow his roommate's ties. 
* * * He hails from Sacramenta and 
owns a car to get there. * * * He be- 
longed to the Minister ium 2 and 3, 
is the treasurer of the Life Work 
Recruits, also was the society chap- 
lain during the past two years. He 
is a member of the Kalozetean Liter- 
ary Society. 



GLADYS FAE BACHMAN 



Among the warblers of the Eury- 
dice Choral Club we find Miss Gladys 
Fae Bachman, a native of Middle- 
town, Pa. However, Miss Bachman 
does not care for solo work and 
hence will not be found in the Metro- 
politan Opera House. She will be 
seen, though, expounding History, as 
that is her major, t the High School 
'kids', having selected teaching as 
her profession. 

Miss Bachman lives in West Hall 
* * * She enjoys dancing. * * * Has 
a pre-season sunburn * * * Abhors 
dogs * * * Belonged to the Eurydice 
Choral Club for four years. * * * 
Is a members of the Clionian Liter- 
ary Society. * * * Played class bas- 
ketball 2 and 3, and is said to De 
quite an economist. 

"Mike" is one. of the few who can 
combine pleasure and work, and this 
she does by applying common sense 
for which she is noted. 



mount Theatre at Times Square. It 
is eight o'clock in the evening. The 
people are jammed into the lobby and 
the line extends far out into the 
street. Each inddvidiual seeks 
to enter, yet, without success 
he clings hopelessly to his place in 
the big line. The ushers are kept 
busily engaged, first, announcing the 
next performance and then prevent- 
ing a "grand! rush" for the entrance. 
We leave this spot and walk on up 
the wide street. The "lights of 
Broadway" gleam all about us an- 
nouncing some new play or motion 
picture or advertising some new com- 
modity. These lights, millions of 
them, tell their stories with a dis- 
pay of colors and unique designs. 
They seem to keep in constant mo- 
tion never once failing to perform 
their duty. Mechanical, indeed, they 
show us why Edison deserves all the 
credit in the world for his marvelous 
invention. We pass by many other 
theatres. Cafeterias, filled with 
many joy seekers, line the streets. In 
some side street may be heard the 
music issuing from some night club 
or "speakeasy". In this continuous 
movement, when the city is at play 
there is alwaye haste. They seem- 
ingly cannot spare a moment, even 
when they are enjoying themselves. 
They rush from the theatre to some 
cafeteria thence to the subway or 
elevators, no time is last and their 
motto is, "A minute saved 1 is a min- 
ute earned." Reckess^ daring 1 , ad- 
venturous, and speedy, such is the 
life of the big city. Each person is 
just another member of the large 
family. When he is gone, he is not 
missed, someone else fills the gap. 

New York may have its street- 
cars and elevators, its throngs of 
people and hasty methods, its gleam- 
ing lights and) sky-scraping build- 
ings, but give me the life of the 
country, the peacefulness, quietness 
and solitude of the rural district, 
away from the maddening throngs 
where I may come home in the even- 
ing, without rushing for some sub- 
way or elevated train, to sit beside 



the glowing fire on the hearth in 
an easy chair and dream, for here I 
am at peace with the world. 

By William M. Speg 
O 




Quite a good record was set by L. 
V.'s baseball team fourteen years 
ago when they made a trip to sev- 
eral southern colleges. The first 
game on the trip was played against 
Western Maryland, April 12, and the 
result favored L. V. C. 8 to 3. The 
thirteenth, the team defeated Mt. St. 
Joseph's College 15 to 0. The last 
game on the trip, however, meant a 
defeat for L. V. when they lost to 
Mt. St. Mary's College with the score 
10 to 4. However within a few days 
after they returned! home they re- 
venged their by trimming Gettys- 
burg to a score of 6 to 2. 

The German Club, The Deutscher 
Verein was reorganized in 1915, after 
years. It has by now disappea 
again, howevery there are rumors 
having been neglected for sev 
its revival. 

The first program was as follows: 
Vereingesang; Herman, der erste 
deutsche Held und seine Stellung in 
der deutsche Literature; Gedicht; 
Humoristiches; Klavier Solo; Krieges 
Nachrichten; Vereingesang. 

On the evening of November 30, 
1916, Ng Poon Chew, a native of 
China, spoke in Engle Hall. He was 
a noted authority on the political up' 
heaval in China. 

Ng Poon Chew published' the first 
Chinese newspaper in America. 
was an acknowledged authority ° n 
questions which involved the joint in- 
terests of the American and Chinese 
peoples. He was a splendid writer 
and story teller and for many 
bore the title, "The Chinese 
Twain." 



ired 
of 
zeral 



years 
Mark 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, MAY 8, 1930. 



PAGE THREE 




"A COLLEGE JOKE TO CURE THE 'BLUES' " 

— Jonathan Swift. 



He took her rowing on the lake 

She vowed she'd go no more — 
I asked her why — her answer was: 
"He only hugged the shore." 

—LVC— 

Blasted be the ties that blind. 

— LVC— 

Aileen — I met my husband on the street today. 
Blaine — Yes, it's a pretty small world after ail. 

— LVC— 

"That's just about the scythe of it," said the stalk of wheat as the 
reaper struck it. 

— LVC— 

HOW TO GET A TUX SHIRT OFF 
Now that the rush season is with us once again we present a few littie 
helps on how to overcome that all-important problem of taking otf a tux 
shirt. 

1. Go on an 18 day diet till you are a mere shadow of your former 
self. Enter a dark room. Shadow and shirt wii disappear completely. 

2. Go t a reliable laundry. Alter going through their cleaning pro- 
cess, shirt will be reduced to threads. Throw away threads. 

3. Bet the shirt on F. and M. 

4. If all other methods fail — laugh it off! 

— LVC— 

Willie went to Paris 

And loved a Paris queen, 
Until she made his salad 

With lots of Paris green. 

— LVC— 

Guide — On our right we have the palatial home of Mr. Gould. 
Old Lady— John Jay Gould ? 

Guide— No, Arthur Gould. And on the left is the residence of Mr. 
Vanderbilt. 

Old Lady — Cornelius Vanderbilt? 

Guide— No, Reginald Vanderbilt. And in front is the First Church of 
Christ. (Turning to Old Lady), Now's your chance. 

— LVC— 

Sitr— What do you do when you dream of bikes at night ? 
Fred — Have yourself cycle-analyzed. 

— LVC— 

She said, "You naughty boy, go way!" 

As she had said to many. 
He said to her, "Go weigh yourself," 

And handed her a penny. 

— LVC— 

Anne — This must be a Mohammedan restaurant. 
Eva^Why? 

Anne— It says here, "Meals served Allah carte." 

— LVC— 

Bfi UEVE IT OR NOT- 

<W 6 Scanaa * at tne ra dio studio was caused by the Whispering tenor's 

^hd for more hush money. 
t t , art holet has moved his base of operations from the Boy Scout Camp 
Cft e lumberyard. 

College is an institution of "loaning". 
We bailee, a Yale graduate, gets 9,000 smackers a week for singing 

^°ngs. It just goes to show what a college education will do for a man. 
"0 1 ^ re d Myers was seen the other day in the library, avidly perusing, 

r ^Oumb Animals." 

tho « cnorus girl gets her 40 winks every night, but they all come from 
nr st row. 

e hew airline to the coast is just another fly-by-night scheme. 
ma Binner thinks that she can pull chickens out of turkey tails. 



KAPPA LAMBDA NU 



Everybody out! What for? Clio 
Circus! When? Monday, May 12! 
Real animals? Yes indeed! 

Surely no one wants to miss the 
opportunity to see this unusual cir- 
cus. It isn't often that the campus 
is afforded such a rare treat. The 
acrobats, the tight-rope walker, the 
educated pigs, the fat lady, Amos 'n 
Andy — any one of these features, 
taken separately, is worth twice the 
price of admission. 

The interesting fact is that you 
Will recognize a great many of the 
participants as persons whom you 
have seen before — probably on L. V's 
campus itself. 

No — don't miss Clio Circus! Come 
— bring your friends, relatives, 
sweethearts — everybody. 

O 

PHILOS GATHER 

FOR ANNIVERSARY 



(Continued from Page One) 

cisms they could get, for it amounts 
to the fact that they have the ability 
to put themselves into the role and 
they have interpreted it as their as- 
sociates have seen them respond to 
the real experiences of life. The 
criticism one is forced to make here 
is that this cast, with a few excep- 
tions, was so well adapted to their 
roles that one had the constant im- 
pression they were merely acting na- 
tural. Can this criticism not become 
the stage as a house (or life in the 
broader sense) with "the fourth 
wall" removed. These worthy mem- 
bers of a cast who are often criti- 
cised' as "just acting natural" have 
been chosen because they are identi- 
cal, t a certain extent, to a particu- 
lar character in the play. If they do 
act natural it is merely because the 
stage has become temporarily a bit 
of; realism to them and they anp 
reading their own personalities into 
the roles. 

Apart from the "natural" group, 
the characterization of the hermit by 
Robert Eshelman was an ingenious 
piece of acting, although the vim and 
alertness shown in the bodily move- 
ments of the hermit were out of har- 
mony occasionally with the diseased 
mind of this character. John Snyder, 
as the sneaking, cringing double- 
crosser, had a difficult role which he 
handle with a keen feeling for de- 
tail. 

One particular circumstance under 
which this play was produced made 
it of especial interest to anyone wno 
has been folowing the campus dra- 
matics. The first rehearsals were 
under the direction of Dr. P. A. W. 
Wallace. Because of his illness, the 
direction was later taken over by 
Calvin Keene. The cast showed a 
fine spirit of cooperation in making 
their roles blend as an indivisible 
whole, and' to them is the credit of 
being the first group, in the memory 
of any present student, to put on an 
anniversary program without solicit- 
ing faculty aid throughout the en- 
tire reparation. The entire cast in- 
cluded: 

Elijah Quimby, Edgar Hertzler; 
Mrs. Quimby, Ruth Liller; William 
Hallowell MaGee, Calvin Keene; John 
Bland, Luther Rearick; Mary Nor- 
ton, Ruth Shroyer; Frs. Rhodes, Eva 
Peck; Peters, Robert Eshleman; 
Myra Thornhill, Anne Gohn; Lou 
Max, John Snyder; Jim Cargan, 
Glenn Bendigo; Thomas Hayden, 
Paul Barnhart; Jiggs Kennedy, Ker- 
mit Taylor; The Cop, Francis Barr; 
The Owner of Baldpate, Earl Wolf. 

The Reception 

After the play all wended their 
way to Philo Hall where the recep- 
tion was held. As the guests enter- 
ed the hall refreshments were served 
in an expedient and efficient way. 
The hall was decorated' in a tastefu: 
and pleasing manner by means of 



crepe paper in Philo's colors, blue 
and gold. The already attractive hall 
was made a veritable wonderland uy 
Luther Rearick and his co-workmen. 
Here the guests held their tete-a- 
tetes, old friends met once again, and 
sociability reigned, while music filled 
the air. Thus midst fellowship and 
good cheer another successful Philo 
anniversary ended. 

O 




Tuesday evening, March 8, 1919, 
the Men's Glee Club gave their an- 
nual home concert. The program 
consisted of two aprts. The numbers 
Part I were these: 

(a) "Clang of the Forge," (b) 
"Cupid and the Bee", by the club; 
2, "I Hear a Thrush at Eve", an oc- 
tette; 3, "An Ichshyasaurian Mon- 
ster," the Club; 4,, Reading, "The 
Hazing of Valiant"; 5, (a) "At Twi- 
light," (b) "Bella Napoli," the Club; 
6, "When I was A walking", Trio; 7, 
"The Ocean Shall Be Free," the Club; 
8, "The Star Sprangled Banner," 
Club and Audience. 

Part II — A clever military skit, 
"Saturday Morning Inspection." A 
play, "The Mascot." A reading, "The 
Literary." A piano solo. 

The closing number was the hearty 
singing of "By the Quittapahilla," 
by the Club. 




Among the many alumni who were 
back at L. V. for Philo anniversary 
and May Day were the following: 
The Misses Edna Lang '29, Esther 
Walmer '27, Irene Schrope '29, Mae 
Hamer '29, Ruth Struphar '29, Janet 
Miller '29, Emmaline Schaeffer '29, 
Martha Early '19, and Messrs. Ar- 
chie Lutz '29, Paul Gruver '25, Clar- 
ence Ulrich '27, William Grill '26, 
John Luckens '26, DeWitt Zuse '26, 
Miles Kiehner '29, Harvey Nitrauer 
'28, Millard Miller '28. 




Dr. Paul A. W. Wallace, Head of 
the English Department, six weeks 
leave of absence on account of ill- 
ness has sufficiently recovered to be 
about the campus. He will resume 
his classes next week. 

Among the May Day visitors was 
Miss Yvonne Greene, of Baltimore, 
Md., who was the guest of her moth- 
er, Madame Greene, Dean of Women. 

An inspection of the Journal of 
Morphology and Physiology for 
March 5, 1930, reveals an article on 
Photoreceptors in Mya Arenaria by 
Dr. V. Earl Light of the biology de- 
partment. This paper was submit- 
ted to the Board of University Stud- 
ies of the Johns Hopkins University 
in partial fulfilment of the require- 
ments for the degree of Doctor of 
Philosophy. 

In brief, the paper is a report of 
an investigation on the photorecep- 
tors of Mya Arenaria, the long-neck- 
ed clam, with special reference to 
their distribution, structure, and 
function. The study indicated that 
photosensitive tissue is located on 
the inner surface of the siphon, which 
is sensitive throughout its entire 
length. A histological study showed 
that the photoreceptors are more 
numerous in the middle region than 
in any other. Further data of inter- 
est is also recorded. 

The paper is of value in that it es- 
tablishes a connection among sev- 
eral of the lower forms of animal life 
as far as photosensitive tissue is con- 
cerned, one of the conclusions of the 
paper being that the visual cells 



found in the leech and earthworm ap- 
pear to be homologous with those of 
Mya. 



-O- 



PROPOSED ADDITIONS 

TO THE FACULTY 

We are pleased to announce that 
according to information furnished 
by Pres. Gossard, four new mem- 
bers will be added to the faculty 
for the coming tetwn, one in the way 
of replacement to enable one of the 
members to continue study elsewhere, 
the other three to provide for expan- 
sion in the curriculum. These ex- 
pansions will take the form of adi- 
ditional courses in Geman, a new 
department of Physical Education for 
men, and a new department of Pub- 
lic School Music in the Conservatory 
of Music. 

The proposal is to obtain four ex- 
cellent professors to fill these posi- 
tions, and from present indications 
this purpose will be fully realized. 
The college is to be commended for 
taking these forward steps. The 
friends of L. V. C. everywhere will 
be glad to hear of her steady pro- 
gress and growth. 

O 



BEYOND THE CAMPUS 



A few years ago a bartender in 
Queen's Hall, London, made some ob- 
servations as to the effect of differ- 
ent tyes of music on his sales. 
For 30 yrs. he had been serving 
drinks during the various programs. 
Mozart gave him very little busi- 
ness. Wagner resulted in the sale 
of fifteen times as much beer as did 
a mixed program. Mendelssohn 
stimulated the sale f beer and whis- 
ky, and the Strausses, Johann and 
Richard, led to an increased drink- 
ing of wine and spirits respectively. 



The American people are in the 
habit of associating "largest" and 
"greatest" in connection with adver- 
tising with the United States; yet 
the largest advertising agency in the 
world, according to gross revenue, 
has its home office not in the United 
States but in Germany. 



Israel Zangwill, Hebrew author, 
sat next a "smart" young lady at a 
dinner in Chicago. She was of the 
impudent type. Observing the food 
he was eating and knowing his He- 
brew origin, she exclaimed, Mr. Zang- 
will, how do you like our Chicago 
ham?" 

"I much prefer it to your Chicago 
tongue." 



In the vicinity of Detroit, Ford 
has offered to buy from his dealers 
as many "junkers" as they wish to 
sell him up to the number of new 
cars they accept from the factory. 
He pays $20 for each "junker", less 
a small charge for transporting it 
from the dealers establishment to the 
factory. The long trailers used to 
deliver new cars to dealers re- 
turned to the factory empty. Now 
they come back loaded with incipient 
automobile accidents. 



The Student Council at Gettys- 
burg college is a very broad minded 
body as is shown by their action in 
removing freshman rules for the re- 
mainder of the year. They think that 
the period of time required for the 
training of the frosh does noe require 
an entire term. All freshmen agree 
with this regardless of college affilia- 
tion. 

Another useless thing has found 
a use. Needles of the prickly pear 
are cut to size, shaped, polished, and 
sol d as gramophone needles by Brit- 
ish manufactures. They are said to 
give unusually fine tones and to last 
a hundred playings. 



4 



PAGE FOUR 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, MAY 8, 1930. 



(Continued from Page One) 



LOCALS AVENGE 

F. & M. DEFEAT 



batter. On one occasion he started 
a double play, Daub to Trezise to 
Dennis. 
The box score: 

LEBANON VALLEY 
ab r h o 
Shortlidge, If 4 



2 1 

Patrizio, If 5 1 

2 1 

2 1 



Albright, cf 4 

Stewart, ss 4 

Light, 3b 4 2 

Daub, p 4 

Trezise, 2b 4 12 

Dennis, lb 4 

Murphy, c 3 



a 







1 

3 
6 
4 

1 2 12 
113 10 



Totals 36 8 10 27 15 

FEANKLIN AND MARSHALL 



ab 



Sponsler, cf 5 1 

Darlington, 3b 3 1 

Mazloff, lb 3 

Smoker, rf 4 

Johnson, If 4 1 

Horner, ss 2 

Leister, 2b 10 

Webber, c 4 

Clark, p 2 



o a e 

4 






4 2 
2 

1 
1 



Totals 28 3 3 24 8 5 

F. and M 01101000 0—3 

L, V. C 20003300 x— 8 

Umpire — Gallager. 

O ■ 

URSINUS SLUGS 

WAY TO VICTORY 



By hard hitting Ursinus won a 
baseball game from Lebanon Valley 
on Wednesday by the score of 10-4. 
Three homers were the main blows 
in the slugging match. 

Lebanon Valley started well by 
scoring three runs in the first inning. 
Patrizio knocked out a triple in this 
frame. After that Strine settled 
down and- pitched good ball. The 
home team's only other run came in 
the fifth when Pat walked and came 
home later on Albright's fly to cen- 
terfield. 

Daub pitched good ball for five in- 
nings. In the second he pulled out 
of a tight place by retiring two men 
with the bases full. 

The heavy hitting started in the 
fifth when Sterner got his team's 
first homer. In the sixth Hunter pro- 
duced one in almost the same place 
in left center field. 

The seventh was the big inning. 
Young started it with a terrific hit 
in right field for Ursinus' third home 
run. After that hits followed in suc- 
cession and Bovino went into the box 
and finished the game. 

A feature of the game was the 
play of the two Dennis brothers at 
first base. Each one got two hits 
and played a nice fielding game. 
The box score follows: 

Lebanon Valley 
ab 

Shortlidge, If 4 

Patrizio, rf 3 

Albright, cf 3 

Steward, ss 4 

Light, 3b 4 

Trezise, 2b 4 

Daub, p 3 

Bovino, p 1 

Dennis, lb 4 

Murphy, c 2 

Heller, c 2 



1 



h 

1 
00 



1 



2 





COLLEGE CALENDAR 



Friday May 9 — Eurydice Club at 
York. 

Debate with St. Thomas at home. 
Literary societies' meetings. 
Saturday, May 10 — Baseball with 
Dickinson, at home. 
Joint Sessions Kalo-Clio. 
Sunday, May 11— Y. M. and Y. W. 

meetings. 
Monday, May 12 — Cli Circus. 
Tuesday, May 13 — Prayer meeting. 
Wednesday, May 14 — Baseball 
with Susquehanna, at home. 
Tennes with Susquehanna, 3 P. 
M., at home. 



! 

►<»?♦ 



-o- 



The Girls Glee Club of the Ithaca 
'Conservatory of Music will give a 
concert in the Chapel on Friday even- 
ing, May 9, at 8 o'clock. 
Admission fifty cents. 

O 

HOW ABOUT YOUR 
COLLEGE EXPENS- 
ES FOR NEXT 
YEAR? 



Write us immediately for a 
good money-making proposi- 
tion selling (1) college and fra- 
ternity jewelry including class 
rings, (2) attractive high grade 
individual stationery printed to 
customers order, (3) complete 
line of felt and leather goods, 
and (4) all styles of college 
colors. In your letteil, state 
which of the above four inter- 
ests you, and be sure to give 
two references and your sum- 
mer address. 

INDIAN SALES AGENCY 
Williamsburg, Va. 



Fine assortment of Watches, Rings. 

Chains, & etc. 
New Century Chiming Grandfather 
Clock3 

LIGHT'S JEWELRY STORE 
51 West Main St. 



PIANOS 

PLAYER PIANOS 

PLAYER ROLLS 
VICTOR RADIOS 

VICTROLAS 

VICTOR RECORDS 
SHEET MUSIC 

Miller Music Store 

738 Cumberland Street 
Lebanon, Pa. 



M. H. SMITH 

JEWELER 

Watches at Lowest Prices 
Watch and Clock Repairing 
38 Railroad St. Annville, Pa, 



H W MILLER 

HARDWARE 
OF QUALITY 



Annville 



Pa. 



PRINTING 

When you want work 
of the better kind see 

HIESTER— The Printer 



TRY OUR HOME MADE 
SANDWICHES 

QUALITY LUNCH 

BREYER'S ICE CREAM 
A Specialty 

7 E. Main St. Annville, F a . 



J. F BERLEW 
DEPARTMENT STORE 

Two Doors From Post Office 

Invites your inspection of 
General Merchandise 



PHOTOGRAPHS 

LIVE FOREVER 

Ulrich's Studio 

820 Cumberland St. 



24 HOUR 



***** 

FILM SERVICE 



PRINTING 



PUBLICATION. 
BOOKS, C A T A 
LOGUES, STATION- 
ERY, CARDS, TAGS, 

NNYILLE PRINTING 




MPANY 



ANNVILLE PA, 



ARTISTS SUPPLIES 

Canvas, Parchment, Japanese Tissue, 
Fabriano White and Grey Charcoal 
Papers, Whatman's Hot and Cold- 
pressed Papers, Oil, Water and 
Decora Colors, Brushes, Atomizers, 
China Palettes, Drawing Boards, Col- 
ored Crayons and Pencils. 

All high grade materials 

BOLLMANS 

.33 South Eighth Street, 
Lebanon, Pa. 



For Quality 

Baked Products 

Patronize 

FINK'S BAKERY 

Main Street 



Sale of Book Ends to 
Sell at 

29c a pair 

These Book Ends Are 
Worth From $1.00 to $1.50 
a pair. 



GRIMMS 



COLLEGE BOOK STORE 



E. J. SNAVELY AND COMPANY 

UMBRELLAS, LUGGAGE and SPORTING GOODS 
ATHLETIC EQUIPMENT 
628 Cumberland St. 
LEBANON, PENNA. 



PARKER FOUNTAIN PENS 

GUARANTEE D FOR LIFE 

Two Pens in One— A Desk Pen and a Pocket Pen. 
Ask To See Ihem. 

ESBENSHADE'S BOOK STORE 

38 N. 8th St. -:- -:- -:-: Lebanon, Pa. 



D. L SAYLOR & SONS 

Contractors 

LUMBER AND COAL 



ANNVILLE. PA. 



HOUSE OF GOOD 



Wm. Penn Highway 
Near Annville 



For 

QUALITY PLUS 

in 

Material and Workmanship 
Repairs at Special Rates 
Go To 

ANNVILLE SHOEMAN 
207 W. Main 



Meals Served at All Hours 



BANQUETS AND PARTIES 
Our Specialty 



Totals 



Ursinus 



32 



ab 



Francis, c 5 

Cable, ss 5 

Sterner, 2b 5 

Young, cf 5 

Dennis, lb 6 

Baterman, 3b 5 

Miller, rf 5 

Hunter, If 5 

Strine, p 3 

Super, lb 1 



r 


2 
3 
1 

1 
2 
1 




Totals 



45 10 16 



CLOTHING OF 

JSBAS 

Lebanon, Pa. 



QUALITY 

EHORE 



KREAMER BROS. 



STEINITE RADIOS 
EASY ELECTRIC WASHE R 
COLUMBIA GAS STOVES AND RANGES 
RUGS AND LINOLEUMS 

"House of Better Values" 
FURNITURE AND UNDERTAKING 

328 W. Main St. Phone 6R3 



Annville, P«- 



—Shaeffer's Lifetime Pens — 

NONE BETTER ABSOLUTELY GUARANTEED 

AN EVERYDAY NECESSITY FOR 
COLLEGE STUDENTS 

U * y% T>¥?T *C ^ e Store of Lebanon 
il J\lKrhjLi O 757-759 Cumberland Street 



DON'T FORGET A BOX OF WHITMANS CHOCOLATES FOR 

MOTHER'S DAY 

THE PENNWAY 

OPPOSITE P. O. 
A FULL LINE OF FRESH PASTRY DAILY 



D 



afi 

its 
of 

Vv( 

tu 
of 

se< 
do 
of 

del 
8-J 



h;u 
ti-1 
an 
Sp 
of 

6-2 

m 

tal 
ttlj 
thi 
CO] 
to< 

H 

ku 
an 
8g 
bu 
6-2 
Ba 
fr< 

eoi 
pe< 

1 

s« 
vie 
ha 

to 
IT 



Co 
ee] 

Mi 

Ua 




CARNEGIE 
TEST SCORES IN 
THIS ISSUE 




LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



Y. M.— Y. W. 
HOUSE PARTY 
FRI., MAY 16 



VOLUME VI 



ANNVILLE, PENNSY LVANIA, THURSDAY, MAY 15, 1930 



No. 7 



NET MEN ATONE FOR 
BASEBALL DEFEAT 



DICKINSON FALLS 
CLOSE MATCH, 
5-4 



IN 



Lebanon Valley's tennis team journ- 
eyed to Dickinson last Saturday and 
after a terrific fight brought home 
its fifth conquest of the season. Four 
of the games that Lebanon Valley 
won went to three sets. 

Shroyer, Hertzler, and Dunmoyer 
turned in singles victories. All three 
of them won the first set, lost the 
second, and came back to win the 
deciding one. Shroyer defeated Kule, 
of Dickinson, 6-3, 3-6, 6-3. Hertzler 
defeated Oler, of Dickinson, 7-5, 4-6, 
6-3. Dunmoyer won from Budding, 
6l Dickinson, 6-2, 5-7, 6-3. 

Meanwhile the other Lebanon Val- 
ley men had more: than they could 
handle. After winning the first set 
6-1, Fink found the going too hard 
and dropped the next two s?ts to 
Spahr, of Dickinson, 1-6, 1-6. Baron, 
of Dickinson defeated John Rank 6-2, 
6-3 while Jacobs, Dickinson, won from 
Ulrich 7-5, 6-1. 

Lebanon Valley achieved victory by 
taking two out of the three doubles 
matches. New pairings were used 
than those use in any of the former 
contests. Shroyer and Fink playing 
together for the first time scored 
a comparatively easy victory over 
Rule and Spahr 6-1, 7-5. Hertzler 
and Dunmoyer had to do plenty of 
fighting after dropping the first set 
but finally emerged with a 5-7, 6-4, 
6-3 victory over Oler and Budding. 
Karon and Jacobs won for Dickinson 
from Rank and Ulrich 7-5, 6-4. 

Lebanon Valley meets Dickinson 
again this Saturday on the home 
courts. An exciting contest is ex- 
pected to result. 

Five more matches remain on the 
s cedul e all of which should result in 
victories. Three of the five teams 
have already been beaten in previous 
games and the other two have lost 
to some colleges that Lebanon Val- 
le y has defeated. 



-o- 



it haca glee club 
entertain on campus 



Con 



T he Girls' Glee Club of the Ithaca 
^nservatory f Music gave an ex- 
cellent concert on Friday evening, 

fj a y 9, at eight o'clock In Eng?j 
Hall. 

The program consisted of various 

Ur nbers, well chosen and which were 
rendered in a most pleasing way. 

flirty-five voices comprised the 
Cub andi each voice blended so wen 
as to make a perfect ensemble of 
^und. Unfortunately due to the 
. r S' e number of students who had 
*T 1 the campus for the week-end, 

er e were only a few who had the 
^Ppoitunity of hearing this able en- 

r tt\i n f (mt However those present 
We* 

re most enthusiastic in their 
pr ais e of the Ithaca "trillers". 



LIFE WORK RECRUITS 

VISIT AT LANCASTER 



Last Friday evening the Life Work 
Recruits made their last visit of the 
season. They rendered a program at 
the Covenant United Brethren 
Church, of Lancaster. Robert Eshle- 
man gave two piano solos, and Earl 
Wolf sang two tenor solos at the 
opening of the program. Both of 
these solists were greatly appreciat- 
ed by the audience. The speaker for 
the occasion was Miss Ruth Cooper. 
She spoke on the theme, "A Thing 
of Beauty is a Joy Forever." Ker 
message, which centered about 
motherhood, was enhanced by a very/ 
receptive audience. Other members 
of the delegation were Chester O. 
Goodman, Lester Kaufman, Ruth 
Coble, and Fred Mund. 

This service of the Recruits to 
nearby churches is an innovation by 
which speakers, singers and others 
supply the need's of church and 
Christian Endeavor services. In the 
seven trips of this season not only 
has Christian service been rendered, 
but the college has been favorably 
advertised. 





LARGE AUDIENCES 
ATTEND RECITALS 



PLEASED BY SECOND AND 
THIRD OF SPRING 
SERIES 

A friendly audience was present at 
the Engle Conservatory last Thurs- 
day evening to enjoy the second 
of the spring recitals which 
was given by the Misses Al-i 
cesta Slicher, Soprano, Elieonor Kis- 
singer, Organ, and Margaret Young, 
Piano. 

Miss Young opened the program 
with a beautiful interpretation of the 
first movement of the Beethoven 
Sonata in D Minor. In her second 
group, Miss Young exceutad with 
grace and finesse two numbers of 
the more modern school,, the "May 
Night" of Palmgrenls, and "Lotus 
Land" by Cyril Scott. 

For her first group, Miss Slichter 
sang a group of three German songs, 
"Wiegenlied" by Brahms, "Das Veil- 
chen" by Mozart, and "Wohin" by 
Schubert. In all of these, she dis- 
played a keen sense of interpreta- 
tion. In her second appearance, she 
showed a mastery of many technical 
difficulties in the French selection, 
"Ah, Je Veux Vivre" — from Gounds's 
opera, "Romeo and Juliet." Miss 
Slichter's last group, one of English 
and American songs, consisting of 
"Sylvelin", by Sinding, "Eternal 
Love," by Woodman, "The White 
Dawn is Stealing" by Cadman, and 
"Come Down Laughing Streamlet," 
by Spross brought forth her clear 
diction and, in conclusion pleased the 
audience in presenting music of a 
diverse character. Miss Hester Thomp 
son proved a very sympathetic ac- 
companist for Fiss Slichter. 

Miss Kissinger played with a fine 
sense of style and fluent technique, 
(Continued on Page Four) 



ROUDABUSH TO FILL 
STATE Y. M. OFFICE 



IS ELECTED VICE-PRES. 
OF STATE STUDENT 
COUNCIL 



Lebanon Valley College was singu- 
larly honored at the Y. M. C. A. Of- 
ficers Training Conference held last 
week at Selinsgrove. At a meeting 
of the State Student Council of Penn- 
sylvania, composed of representa- 
tives from the Y. M. Cabinets of 
schools and colleges throughout the 
state, Mr. Robert Roudabush of the 
present Junior class, was elected to 
fill the office of Vice-President. 

So far as is known to the repor- 
ter, this is the first time that an L. 
V. man has been elected to a major 
position on the Council. According- 
ly we feel justly proud in being rep- 
resented in this manner, the more so 
in view of the fact that the work 
of the State Student Council has been 
increasing from year to year, and 
the responsibilities of the officers 
have correspondingly increased. The 
students join in congratulating Mr. 
Roudabush, and wishing him a suc- 
cessful term in this position. 

O 

DEBATE WITH FOREIGN 

TEAM IS CONSIDERED 



Professors Stokes and Stevenson, 
faculty supervisors of debating, are 
said to be considering a debate be- 
tween a picked team of local forensic 
artists and one of the two foreign 
teams which will hold exhibitions in 
this vicinity next year. Both teams 
will be composed of a number of 
speakers selected from foreign uni- 
versities, two of whom will partici- 
pate in each debate. One of the 
teams will be an English-speaking 
German group, the other will repre- 
sent several Scottish universities. 

No official arrangements have as 
yet been made. If sufficient enthusi- 
asm can be stirred up among the 
students, however, such arrange- 
ments will in all probability be com- 
pleted. In view of the splendid 
showing made by the local debaters 
this season, Professors Stokes and 
Stevenson feel that the students 
should give this movement their sup- 
port, particularly in helping to de- 
fray the slight expenses which the 
exhibition would entail. 

O 

GAMES CALLED ON 

ACCOUNT OF RAIN 



The Baseball game and tennis 
match with Susquehanna scheduled 
for Wednesday afternoon, May 14. 
were called on account of a steady 
downpour of rain which continued 
throughout the morning and after- 
noon, making the diamond and courts 
unfit for use. 



COMMERCE CLUB 

ELECTS OFFICERS 



At a meeting of the Commerce 
Club held Wednesday noon the follow- 
ing officers were elected for next 
year. 

President — George Patrizio 
' Vice President — Russell Dennis 

Secretary — J. Warren Light 

Treasurer — George Wood 

The Commerce Club has had quite 
a successful and profitable year for 
its first upon our campus and shows 
every sign of improving in years to 
come. 

Three of its members will graduate 
this year, but already approximately 
twenty candidates for the business 
course have applied for admission, 
and there is little doubt that every 
one will ally himself with the Com- 
merce Club in view of the services 
rendered by the organization to those 
pursuing a business course. 

The other organizations of the cam- 
pus join in wishing this newcomer a 
prosperous future. 

O 



DICKINSON HANDS . 
L. Y. A 6-1 DEFEAT 



POUNDS WAY TO, SIX- 
POINT LEAD IN 
FIRST INNINGS 



Aided by two errors and a five hit 
uprising, including a home run, in 
the first two stanzas, the strong 
Dickinson College nine amassed a to- 
tal of six runs, which was sufficient 
to hand Lebanon Valley a 6-1 on the 
local athletic field last Saturday. 

Three runs were collected in each 
of the first and second innings as 
Dickinson found Guss Daub's pitch- 
ing to their liking. The feature of 
this uprising was a home run Dy 
Dassin, the visitors' third baseman, 
scoring Heffner ahead of him. 

After the second inning Patrizio 
went into the box and held Dickm- 
son in check the remainder of tne 
game. He hurled masterful ball let- 
ting down the visitors with four scat- 
tered hits the remainder of the 
game, turning in his best perform- 
ance of the season. However, his 
excellent pitching was of no avail as 
his mates were unable to hit Shomac, 
the Dickinson moundsman. 

Lebanon Valley's five hits were 
collected by Patrizoo, Albright, Stew- 
art, Light, and Jacks, each getting 
one. Patrizio with a double was the 
leading stickman, the remainder of 
the hits being singles. 

The fielding f "Sweeney" Light 
at second base was one of the fea- 
tures of the game. "Sweeney" han- 
dled a total of nine chances for six 
outs and three assists. 

The lone Blue and White run came 
in the thirdi stanza when with two 
out Patrizio helped his own cause by 
sending out a vicious double to cen- 
terfield. "Jap" Albright smeared the 
next offering of Shomac's for a sin- 
gle to center sending in Patrizio. 
(Continued on Page Four) 



SOPHS COMPLETE 
CARNEGIE TESTS 



MEN SHOW REMARKABLE 
LEAD IN FINAL 
SCORES 



The great event is past and the 
Sophomores are again breathing easy. 
The Carnegie Tests have been duly 
signed, sealed, delivered, graded and 
the results tabulated. And accord- 
ing to the Second Year men (and 
women) they were "some exams!" 

The complete series consisted of 
tests covering practically every part 
of the regular curriculum and a test 
for general intelligence andi one for 
general culture thrown in for good 
measure. A total of two thousand 
seven hundred and twenty five ele- 
ments were submitted to each indi- 
vidual, regardless of the particular 
subjects he chose for the various 
tests. A comparison of the ratings 
of the Sophomores with those of 
other schools throughout the state 
and nation can only be made when 
the full results are offered to the pub- 
lic, which will doubtless require con- 
siderable time. For the present we 
must be contented with compliment- 
ing the Sophs for the splendid spirit 
of cooperation manifested through- 
out the week, and.' the publication of 
those who ranked as the ten highest 
in each group. 

Special attention is called to the 
fine showing made by the men, who 
head the list in all but two of the in- 
dividual tests, while the names of 
six men must be passed before the 
first female name appeaif; on the 
list of the total scores. 

Following are the lists of the ten 
Sophomores making the best score 
in each division ranked in descend- 
ing order: 

Grand Totals 

Robert Rawhouser, Alvin Kinney, 
Marlin Miller, John Stine, Newton 
Burgner, Fredrick Mund, Ruth Agen, 
Anne Esbenshade, Paul Keene, Eliz- 
abeth Ulrich. 

General Intelligence 

Rawhouser, Keene, Miller, Esben- 
shade, Stine, Barbara Ulrich, Kinney, 
Mary Buffington, Elizabeth LeFevre, 
Dorothy Snyider. 

English 

Agen, Esbenshade, Elizabeth Ul- 
rich, Elinor Houck, Kinney, Keene, 

(Continued on Page 3) 



GERMAN CLUB MEETS 

ADOPTS CONSTITUTION 



Wednesday, evening, the German 
club Der Deitshe Verien held its bi- 
monthly meeting in North Hall par- 
lor. Miss Ethel May Hower presid- 
ed. The items of most importance 
were the reading and adoption of] 
the constitution; a solo by Miss 
Eulalie Morton. They rendered 'Der 
Dolter Eisenba.fi.' The singing of 
Die Forelei completed the program. 

At their next meeting the club will 
present a play written by one of the 
members and all those interested in 
the German language are invited. 




PAGE TWO 



LA VIE CQLLEG1ENNE, THURSDAY, MAY 1% 193Q 



JMie (Eallegietm* 

"ESTABLISHED 1925 

A weekly publication by the Under- 
graduate Students of Lebanon 
Valley College 

EDITORIAL STAFF 

Russel Etter, '31 Editor-in-Chief 

Ruth Liller, '31 Associate Edito 

R. Roudabush, '31 .... Associate Editor 
R .Morgan, '31 .... Managing Editor 

KEPORTOSIAL STAFF 

Robert Eshleman, '31 - 

Madeline Sheddy, '31 

Ruth Shroyer, '32 

Hilda Buckley, '32 

Walter Krumbeigel, '33 ' 

General Reportei 

Mary Goshert, '32 Conservatory 

Robert Rawhouser, '32 Athletic- 
Dorothy Garber, '32 Glioma.; 

Mary Epply, '32 Delphian 

Percy Clements, '33 Kalozetean 

Fred Mund, '32 Philokosmian 

Edna Early, '31 .... Alumni Reporter 

BUSINESS STAFF 

G. Becker, '31 .... Business Manager 
P. Keene, '32 Asst. Business Manage. 
C. Wise, '31 —. Circulation Manage. 

FACULTY ADVISORS 

Dr. Paul A. W. Wallace, Knjflish Dept. 
Miss Mary K. Wallace, English Dept. 
Dr. Paul S. Wagner. Math. Oept. 

LA VIE COLLEG1ENNE, a member 
of the Intercollegiate Newspaper asso 
ciation ot the Middle Atlantic stales. 

Single Copies IV cents 

(Subscription per year 

Entered at the Annville, Pa., post- 
office as second class matter under the 
aci of March 3. 187 9. 



A COMMENDATION 



We notice with a great deal 01 
relief that the straw back-stops foi 
the targets on the archery course 
have at last attained a degree o± 
permanence. Just how many bails 
of straw went up in smoke since 
archery became one of the activities 
open to girls on the campus we re- 
frain from estimating. Perhaps the 
boys who help to pay for them can 
supply definite information here. At 
any rate this one form of childish- 
ness has been given a temporary va- 
cation which we hope will ripen into 
a permanent leave of absence. 

But "Honor to whom honor is due'' 
is our policy. Accordingly we wish 
to commend' the men for the unusual 
amount of respect for the property 
of the college displayed this year. 
Perhaps the size of the Breakage- 
Fee refund checks exercised a res- 
taining influence, and perhaps nox. 
However, it may be accounted for, 
there has been less of the senseless 
and unmanly destruction of property 
than for quite a few years. Which 
is as it should be. College men 
are usually supposed to have passed 
beyond the stone-throwing, window- 
breaking periods of youth. 

More power to you, men! You have 
an ample supply of "brains" and 
common sense, prove it to the rest J 
of the world by continuing to use 
them. 



CONGRATULATIONS, MEN! 



Who wouldi have thought it! An- 
other tradition gone plumb to smash! 
What is this college coming to. 

Here the men of . L. V. fall asleep 
at the switch for goodness knows 
how long, and let the ladies run cir- 
cles around them, scholastically 
speaking, for a coon's age. They 
chivaluously yield the honors to the 
ladies, and passively accept their In- 



tellectual rulership. They establish 
as a foregone conclusion the principle 
that the ladies shall be high scorers 
in all exams — and then the Carnegie 
Tests must come butting in. 

Just turn to the lists of high scorers 
[n last week's "Battle of the Books" 
if you wish to have your eyes open- 
ed. These pestiferous Second Year 
men practically ran away with the 
whole affair, in fact some of the fair 
„nes are still lost in the dust. 

Naughty, naughty! This will never 
do. Don't you fellows know that the 
traditionsal college man "comes up" 
to be entertained — to socialize to in- 
dulge in athletics, to carouse, to drink, 
co gamble, to fuss, and fume, and 
strut — but never under any circum- 
stances to open a book or do any 
jerious work. It is quite true that 
ail of theoe activities might be con- 
aucted to greater advantages at home 
^nd with a considerable saving 01 
xunds, but the young man could not 
ohen lay ciaim to being "collegiate.' 
vVho ever gave you fellows permis- 
sion anyway to strike the proper bal- 
ance between currucular and extra- 
oUixicuiar activities? 

rmc out of all seriousness, the 
oopnomores are to be congratulated 
xor tne splendid showing made by 
,ne men. That the results of their 
vvork are typical of the other classes 
jan scarcely be doubted. Why, then, 
do the men frequently trail so far 
uehmd the women in the class-room'/ 
oiinpiy because it has come to be 
.ne accepted state of affairs for the 
men to relax into fits of laziness, 
„ne more permanent, the more typi- 
cal. 

in the future, the professors should 
oe justified in expecting a higher 
quality 01 work m the class-room 
irom those men who ranked conspic- 
uously m this series of tests. We 
n„pe the profs, will not be disap- 
pointed, and trust that the remaind- 
er 01 tne male portion of the studenc 
jody win follow the lead of the Sophs 
and stage a scholastic "come-back". 



-< )- 



ANOTHER FAD 



Heads up! We enter the presence 
ji cur reading public begging for 
information. Due to a gross error 
jn the part of the Carnegie examin- 
ers, no data is available in answer 
co the question: "Who started the 
/o-yo fadi and why?" 

Since the introduction of these lit- 
Je thingum-bobs, the profs have 
been tearing their hair in despara- 
tion in a vain attempt to make the 
students produce, while the editor has 
had to howl louder than ever for 
copy. 

Wont someone please do something 
t.bout it? Even the "bull-sessions" 
are being broken up by this pest, 
which we understand the authorities 
have considered, quarantining along 
with the Japanese Beetle and the 
Mediterranean Fruit Fly. 

O 

MARIONETTES 



The history of acting and play- 
making has run hand in handi with 
that of the marionette. For a long 
time the marionettes have been m 
the background, while the so-called 
serious drama has occupied the front 
of the stage, forgetting its simple 
progenitor. Now an offspring of the 
theatre is welcoming the marionette 
to its bosom. The movies are re- 
popularizing the marionette. Many 
of the arger companies have signed 
some of the smaller troups to appear 
in short talking features. 

Those of us who enjoyed the mar- 
ionette players who visited this cam- 
pus last year will great with enthus- 
ism the first appearance of marion- 
ette players in the movies. 



FROSH THOUGHTS 



ON THE GOOD IN 

FRESHMEN RULE 



Most of us as Freshmen are in- 
clined to think that the various rules 
and regulations are placed upon us 
merely for our inconvenience and 
for the benefit of the upper classmen. 
This is true to a certain extent, but 
can we not find other reasons back 
of most of them ? Let us try to 
apply a few of the Freshmen rules 
at Lebanon Valley College to every- 
day life andi see how each student is 
benefited by them. 

Let us consider first one of the 
most disliked of ail the rules — 
"Freshmen when being instructed by 
upper classmen shall carry out such 
instructions without remonstrance." 
This means that if an upper ciass- 
man comes up to your room after 
you are in bed and tells you to go 
down-town, you are to obey without 
a word. Dislike of punishment heips 
us to learn to obey this rule to the 
letter. Thus, we are taught a great 
principle — that of obedience. We are 
taught t carry a message to Garcia 
just as Rowan did, with no questions 
asked and no excuses offered. The 
application of this rule in later life 
will go far toward making a suc- 
cess of yourself. 

Friendliness and courtesy are 
taught by other rules. We are re- 
quired to tip our hats, greet our; 
superiors, open doors for them, and 
wait until they come in or go out 
a door before we go in. After we 
have formed these habits 01 courtesy, 
we wil continue the practice in out- 
side life. Of course, we should have 
learned the importance of most 01 
these things before, but in younger 
days, we are inclined to neglect such 
affairs. 

Now as for rhe rule forbidding the 
Freshmen to place their hands in 
their pockets. I'll leave it to your 
judgement to decide whether a man 
does not look better walking along 
swinging his arms naturally or stand- 
ing with his hands at his sides than 
one' who always carries his handp 
in his pockets. I'll admit that pock- 
ets keep your hands warm in cold 
weather, but then few are too poor 
to buy gloves, which will serve the 
purpose just as well. 

During the first two weeks of 
school, the Freshmen were required 
to wear large green cards on which 
were written one's name and home 
city. This, I think, is a clever idea 
to help the other students to become 
acquainted with the Freshmen, and 
incidentally, they are enabled to 
learn to know their own classmates 
in this way. This plan eliminates all 
the embarrassment of asking a stu- 
dent directly what his name is and 
where he is from. 

Another rule that displeases most 
of the Freshmen is the girl rule, for- 
bidding a Freshman to walk or hold 
conversation with a girl until the 
second semester*. Along with this is 
the rule forbidding the student to 
be away from the dormitory after 
nine o'clock. I think that these rules 
help the Freshmen very much. Col- 
lege is generally considered as "tough 
sledding", especially during the first 
year. Thus, by keeping the Fresh- 
men in at night and preventing him 
from having "dates" several nights 
a week, the rules benefit him in the 
way of scholastic activity. 

In view of these thoughts, I have 
tried to make the most of my Fresh- 
men rules. I Believe that they have 
their good as well as their bad feat- 
ures, but on the whole, are neceess- 
ary not only for the good of the in- 
stitution, but, as I have pointed out ; 
for the individual as well. 

By Chester Goodman. 



j~~ Among Our Seniors 





MICHAEL TARANTO 



Among those who will leave this 
institution next month is Mr. Michael 
Taranto, from Linden, New Jersey. 
Having pursued a scientific course 
here 'Mike' intends to enter some 
medical school next fall. 

Mike is one of those who can mix 
up a heavy curriculum with light di- 
versions and get away with it. He 
is an extremely happy chap and is 
able to see a laugh in almost any- 
thing. 

Nevertheless "Mike" is also a 
worker. For three years he was as- 
sistant manager f atheletics but last 
fall he received his reward and was 
made manager of the football squad. 
He is now a member of the 'L' Club 
in consideration for his service. 

Mike was honored by being elected 
to the presidency of his class in h;s 
third year. He also belongs to the 
Kalozetean Literary Society. 



IRENE BACHMAN PETER 

Smiles, that is, 'Frosty,' or with 
more decorum, Miss Peter. She is one 
of West Hall's charter members and 
hence she knows as much as the walls 
about the dormitory. 

Miss Peter is going to be a teacher 
next year and has elected: History as 
her major. She has just completed 
her neophyte experience and seems to 
have enjoyed it, as she came up smil- 
ing. But when doesn't she do just 
that ? 

'Frosty' is a lover of music. She 
has belonged to the Eurydice Choral 
Club for her entire four years, and 
they tell us she surely can warble 
Rumor has it that she is also rather 
skilled in whispering "sweet nothing- 
nesses" into the ears of the gentle- 
men. And lest you should still be 
disatisfied, she is a good dancer, al- 
though she maintains that she nly 
learned last year. 




The announcement has been maide 
recently of the engagement of Miss 
Margaret Haas to U. E. Bals- 
baugh. Miss Haas is a daughter of 
Dr. and Mrs. Haas, Harrisburg. She 
is a graduate of the West Chester 
State Normal School and is now 
teaching in the Steelton grade 
schools. Mr. Balsbaugh, whose home 
is in Hershey, was graduated from 
Lebanon Valley College in 1924. He 
taught in the Girard High School for 
a year following his graduation aniu 
since then has been teaching in the 
Eiizabethtown High School. 



; ITio years' ago" 

In the "College News", 1919 there 
appeared a number of rules for mak- 
ing good, some of which were these: 

1 If you don't like your job learn 
to like it or change it. 

2 Be interested in all you do. 

3 Work with your head and your 
heart as well as with your hands and 
feet. 

4 Be ambitious. 

5 Know why you do a thing be- 
fore you do it. 

6 Be able to stamp your work 
with a mark of personal approval. 

7 Know that the way you do your 
work affects not only you but others 
too. 

8 Be loyal — to yourself and others. 

O 



I Y 15 YEARS AGO 



J 



The class of 1915 in their Sopho- 
nore year gave a minstrel show. They 
'ad a large audience and it was 
hought that this would be continued 
each year, but, to our sorrow, it 



hasn't. 

The program consisted! of two 
parts. In the first part the musical 
ability of the class was shown in 
solos and choruses. The latter part 
of the program was the presentation 
of Shakespeaifc's ^Midsummer 
Night's Dream.' ' 

As a testimony of regard and ap- 
preciation bouquets of onions, rhu- 
barb, rye, horse chestnuts, etc., were 
showered upon the favorites by th* 
different classes and individuals. 



Y. W. NOTES 



In keeping with the day set apar^ 
for mothers, was the program ren- 
dered at "Friendly Hour" on Sunday 
evening. Fond memories of home and 
mother, tender recollections of W' 
gone days, and a realization of t" e 
debt owed in return for her love and 
care and sacrificial living, were all a 
part of the discussion. 

The meeting opened by singing 
Love That Will Not Let Me Go"- 
Mary Elizabeth Stephens, who ^ s 
in charge of the program, then *> e 
gan her story on "Reverie", 



"Oh 



a r e ' 
of 8 



minder of early home lif e » 
mother's unchanging love, andi 
the beneficial influence which ^ 
love has had upon the later h fe 
the individual. ^ 
The "Reverie" was interspe rse ^ 
with miiHir.a.l selections at ^a 



"jylot' 1 ' 

tigs 

hich tl,e 

meaning and 
leader's talk. 



places. Marion Kruger sang 
er am 

Used to Sing"— both of wl 



effectiveness -7 f 
The hymn "F^, 
Our Fathers" was changed to ^ 
of Our Mothers", and was uS .^e 
the final selection. A prayer 
brought the discussion to a c 



1 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, MAY 15, 1930 



PAGE THREE 



th 
ne 
nd 
lis 

ier 
as 
©d 

to 
il- 
ist 

he 
ral 
nd' 
>le 
tei 

ig- 
le- 
be 
al- 
ii y 



wo 
cal 
in 
art 
ion 



ip- 

1U- 

sre 
11* 



ar: 
ett- 
lay 
aid 
by- 

the 

1 a 

'Oh 
lo • 
vas 
toe- 
r e- 
a 
of 
hai 
of 

sed 
ous 
,tii- 
;»e* 
[e»t 
the 
of 
jit* 1 




"A COLLEGE JOKE TO CURE THE 'BLUES' " 

— Jonathan Swift. 



CLIO SURPRISES KALO 
WITH MOONLIGHT HIKE 



( The weatherman dreamed that himself was dead; 

That he stood by his monument tall and read 

The message thereon — and he hung his head, 

For "Probably Warmer" was all it said! 

—LVC— 

Is she unsophisticated? Well, I should say! 
schoolgirl complexion comes from soap. 

— LVC— 

"Gimme a marceling iron and a bottle of carbolic acid." 
"What are you going to do with them?" 
"Gonna curl up and die." 

—LVC— 



Clio entertained Kal with a moon- 
light hike last Saturday evening. 
Participants gathered on North Hall 
steps about seven-fifteen and' the 
hike started promptly at seven- 
thirty. Departing in cliques, couples, 
and "home town tribes" they all met 
at Kreider's Hill. Music for the oc- 
casion was furnished by a portable 
"vie", thanks to the residents of 
West Hall. Refreshments, consist- 
ing of delicious sandwiches and 
punch were served and judging from 
the rapidity of their disappearance, 
ahey were enjoyed by all. Songs,, 
varying greatly in date of popularity 
were then sung by the hikers; this 
may account for the sudden demand 
for Eurytiice and Glee Club concerts. 

"Luna", now full in all its beauty, 
began to cast her spell. Gradually 
the hikers were lured away two *jy 
two to be exact. Everyone of tne 
fifty persons present enjoyed the 
diversion greatly and the hike will 
long be remembered, whether it was 
supervised by the well known "hik- 
ers club" or not. Special permission 
was secured from the head of this 
organization for the use of their 
She still thinks that a | s P ecial typ e of p a stime. 



DELTA LAMBDA SIGMA 



On Friday evening, the members 
of Delphian Literary Society were 
carried back to home and mother, as 
they witnessed the presentation of a 
program which centered upon the 
"He done me wrong," wailed the math problem, as the frosh handed in I tender theme of She who is our best 



his quiz paper. 

—LVC— 

Telephone service between the United States and England is our idea 
of Anglo -Saxophone. 

— LVC— 

ABOUT THAT BIOLOGY EXAM— 



Biology 

Gerald White, Agen, Darwin Wil- 
liandi, Lenora Bender, Helen Groh, 
Lolita Mummeri, He'en Yiengst, 
Mary Eppley, Mund, Euialie Mor- 
ton. 

C 1 MI t*? 

Si'ne, Kinn<y, C<v.rad, K>ene. Al- 
fred Kuhnert, Wittle Anna Garber, 
fohn Hughes., .lames Mon+eith, Eliz- 
:;!»,. tl. Flook. 

General Culture 
Rawhouser. Mund. Kinney, Benz- 
ing, Ayers, Pnrp Barnes, Burgner, 
Mil.ifcr, Houck, LeFevre. 



BUSINESS STUDENTS 

SECURE POSITIONS 



W. 



earthly friend, and. which was quite 
in keeping with the celebration of 
Mother's Day. 

Sara Ensminger opened the meeting 
by conducting a helpful period of de- 
votions, which was chiefly concerned 
with the age-old theme of mother 



"There are other fish in the sea besides dog fish * * * I hope to be a I love. After this, Henrietta Wagner 
scientist some day * * * Every dog has his day * * * So does a dog fish." gave a brief report on "Goose Steps," 
—Violet Morton. " a book written on college life, Then 

"The guy that made up the exam must be dog fish crazy * * * I never and Now; in a clever way she por 
heard of the experiment to whkh you refer, and besides we never studied trayed the college life of mother s 
dog fish * * * trot said Jonah swallowed the whale— how should I know?" I day, and contrasted it with that or 
— Morris. 

"I'm not an M. D!" — Eva Peck. 

— LVC— 

Betty — Let's not go down that path; it's too dark and lonesome. 
Ball) — I'm here, ain't I? 
Betty — That's what I'm afraid of. 

— LVC— 

Be original! Don't wear suspenders or a belt. Eventually your orig 
inality will be noticed. Oh, my yeth!! 



— LVC— 
CAESAR IN A SPEAKEASY 
Veni, vidi, whoopee!! 

—LVC— 

"Farewell, Joe, tomorrow I leave for the convent." 
"So long, Nell — I'll see you anon." 

—LVC— 

"Heard the new Ford song yet, Petronius?" 
"Nay, Tanlac, but ut with it." 
" 'Moan in low,' scurvy." 

— LVC— 

"I've got the first manuscript Van Scribbler ever wrote." 
"That's nothing, I've got the cuffs he passed his first examination with." 

—LVC— 

BELIEVE IT OR NOT— 

"Snapper" McCurdy rode to Lebanon the other day in a car which bore 
a "Just Married" sign. 

Madeline Rife would like to know "wh has charge of those Susque- 



our own day. Marian Kruger then 
sang "Mother Machree", with a depth 
of feeling which was appreciated oy 
her audience. 

Following these numbers, Mary 
Buffington presented a brief program 
consisting of three parts, which was 
filled with reminiscences of other 
days and other ways. The first part 
was a "Minuet" played by Mary K 
Goshert with her usual skill and In- 
terpretation; the second was modern 
syncopation in the form of "Happy 
Days", which was rendered by the 
same artist; the final number was the 
reading of some old W. S. G. A. 
rules, and the comparison of them 
with the rules of the present day, by 
Mary Buffington. 

; 

SOPHS COMPLETE 

CARNEGIE TESTS 



(Continued from Page One) 



Burgner, Cynthia Benzing, Henrietta 
Wagner, Le Fevre. 

Mathematics 
Rawhouser, Miller, Keene, Eugene 
Wittle, Roy Conrad, Clinton Allen, 



h anna boys." «J M*. 

One of our bright Sophomores stated in the Carnegie tests that Mary Kinney, Burgner, James Leathern, 



For verification 



tc 



le 



Baker Eddy was the founder of modern Catholicism. 

Four of the first five presidents came from Virginia. 
se e Prof. Shenk. 

— LVC— 
He r: What's the shape of a kiss ? 
Him: Give me one and I'll call it square. 

— LVC— 

Sl mil e: As reflective as a horse-fly at an auto show. 

—LVC— 

'Son the bootblack's vision bothers him?" 
"Yes, he's always seeing spots before his eyes." 

— LVC— 

DEBATE! 

Li Her vs. Butterwick— "Have we motes or lumber yards in our eyes' 



Stine. 

American History 

Kinney, Adam Snavely, Mund, Raw 
houser, Agen, Wagner, Arthur 
Thompson. Allen, Houck, Anna Gar 
ber. 

French 

Esbenshade, Elizabeth Ulrich, Agen, 
Dorothy Garber, Luella Umberger, 
Dorothy Snyder, Mary Bixler, Pearl 
March, Almeda Myer, Ruth Shroyer 
General Science 
Rawhouser, Miller, Stine, Wittle 
Kinney, Beck, Elias Milivich, Arthur 
Ayres, Allen, Conrad. 



Through the efforts of the Depart- 
ment of Business Administration, 
those students who will receive the 
B. S. in Economics degree this year 
have, with a single exception, been 
advantageously placed in responsi- 
ble business positions. This rapidly 
growing department of the college 
has in the last several years attract- 
ed considerable attention through Its 
success in securing positions for its 
own graduates, as well as students 
from other departments who prefer 
to enter business. 

The Messrs. Sparrow and Motter, 
both graduates of last year's class, 
were placed with the Bell Telephone 
Co., the former in the Commercial 
Department of the Pennsylvania sys 
tern's offices at Uniontown, Pa., the 
latter in the Traffic Department of 
'the New York branch at Jamaica, 
Long Island. Both are doing excep- 
tionally well. 

Due to industrial conditions, the 
Assistant to the Vice President of 
the Bell Telephone Co. of Pennsyl 
vania, Mr. Orth of Harrisburg, has 
announced that his division will take 
on no college men this year, although 
he has considered quite favorably the 
awarding of positions to several 
prospective graduates for next year 
He has also aided' in placing three 
men with the Bell Telephone Co. of 
New York, Mr. Archie Lutz, '29, who 
has given up teaching in preference 
to business, and Messrs. Homer All 
wein and Roy Albright of this year' 
class, the former to locate at either 
New York City or Syracuse imme 
diately, and the latter to enter the 
service sometime in September. 

Mr. Luther Rearick has very for 
tunately secured a position in the 
Sales Department of the Aluminum 
Co. of America, and will start im- 
mediately after graduation upon a 
six months training course which In- 
cludes salary and travelling ex- 
penses to the various plants of this 
large concern throughout the U. S. 
and Canada. Another graduate, 
whose name is withheld for the pres- 
ent, will in all probability be located 
with the Kresge Department Stores 
Co., which offers excellent oportunt- 
ties. This corporation received Mr. 
Enos Dutweiler '29, who is reported 
t be making excellent progress. 

Each year as the number of appli- 
cants grows, new contacts with bus- 
iness firms are being established by 
the Department of Business Admin- 
istration in an effort to continue its 
policy of placing all its students in 
worthwhile positions. 

O 



At the association meeting of the 
Women's Student Government, held 
Wednesday evening, a motion was 
made and carried to standardize the 
pin which the Board of the two years 
had purchased. Heretofore the style 
of the pin selected was by vote of 
the Board. 

The following class representatives 
were elected to next year's Board: 
Seniors — Effie LeVan, Caroline Fish- 
er, Dorothy Hafer, and Madaline 
Sheddy. Juniors: Dorothy Garber and 
Hilda D. Buckley. Sophomore: 
Marion May. Senior Day Student: 
Ruth Liller. 

The nominees presented to the As- 
sociation for selection were: Seniors: 
Dorothy Thompson, Effie LeVan, 
Caroline Fisher, Miriam Daniel, Dor- 
othy Hafer, Mary Stager, Madeline 
Sheddy, and Sara Ensminger. Juniors 
Dorothy Garber, Elizabeth Ulrich, 
Elizabeth Flook, and Hilda D. Buck- 
ley. Sophomores: Anne Gohn, Flo 
Grim, and Marion May, Senior Day 
Students: Ruth Liller and Ethel 
Hower. 





S. G. A. ELECTS BOARD 

FOR 1930-31 TERM 



BEYOND THE CAMPUS 



There are ants in the jungle, call- 
ed Drivers, which can kill elephants* 
Natives say these ants can clean an 
elephant t white, smooth bone in less 
than three days. Yet when these 
same ants are exposed to the rays 
of the African sun they are killed In 
less than two minutes. 



A "waiterless restaurant" has been 
invented by the Daschner Brothers. 
Each table contains a 12-inch center 
slab, the top of a miniature dumb 
waiter, which gives access to the 
kitchen below. The hungry man sits 
down, writes out his order and sends 
it to the kitchen through a slot in the 
table. Food returns via the dumb 
waiter. Empty dishes are removed 
by pressing a button. Each course is 
served in turn and last comes the 
check. 

O 

Students from Dickinson, Gettys- 
burg, Mt. Alto, and the Boy Scou:s 
co-operated with the county fire war- 
den in fighting fires on South Moun- 
tain last Saturday and Sunday. 
Through the untiring efforts of these 
volunteers, together with 300 other 
men, the hazard was under controT 
by Sunday evening. 

O 

The John W. Sterling estate has 
now given a total of nearly $24,000,- 
000 to Yale University, the latest 
gift from this source being one o* 
three million dolars for the construc- 
tion of a graduate school quadrangle 
and another million for the mainte- 
nance of the quadrangle. 

O ■ 

"The educated^ man is a man with 
certain subtle, spiritual qualities 
which make him calm in adversity, 
happy when alone, just in his deal- 
ings, rational and sane in the full- 
est meaning of that word in all the 
affairs of life." 

(Ramsay MacDonald, quoted in the 
New York Times.) 

O 

On April 26, 1930, the Graf Zep- 
pelin, en route from Friedricksehal' 
en, Germany, to the Cardington Air- 
drome, England, flew over London, 
the first visit by a zeppelin since the 
war, when Germany dirigibles were 
used to bomb that city and other 
ports of England. 

O 

It is said that there are a million 
drug addics in this country, that vir- 
tually one person in every hundred 
takes drugs regularly. Some say that 
'Pi^hibition has -caused addics, but 
general reports show this to be false. 

The Department of Health of Los 
Angeles reports that of 500 register- 
ed drug addics on their lists, only 
three claim to have acquired the hab- 
it since the Prohibition Law went in- 
to effect. 



4 



page worn 



LA yj£ CQLLliGJKNNE, THURSDAY, MAY 1% 



DICKINSON HANDS 

L. V. A. 6-1 DEFEAT 

(Continued from Page i) 

The box score: 

L. V. C. 

E. 




2 







A.B. 


R 


n. 


0. 


A. 


Shortlidge, If 


4 








3 





Patrizio, rf, p 


4 


1 


1 








Albright, cf 


4 





1 


2 





Stewart, ss 


4 





1 





9 


Light, 2b 


4 





1 


6 


3 


Daub, p, rf 


3 








2 





Dennis, lb 


4 








10 





Murphy, c 


3 








4 


1 


Jacks, 3b 


3 





1 





2 


Totals 


33 


1 


5 


27 


15 



DICKINSON 

A.B. R. H. O. A. E. 

Bonney, lb 5 1 9 

Folly, ss 3 112 2 1 

Heffner, 2b , 5 I 1 3 o: 

Shomac, p 4 1 

Dassin, 3b 4 11130 

Sheetz, rf 4 0' 0' 

Hedges, cf 3 113 

Biddle, If 4 12 10 

Kashmann, c 3 118 

Totals 35 6 9 27 5 2 

Dickinson 33000000 0—6 

L. V. C 00100000 0—1 

Two-base hits: Patrizio. Home] 
run: Dassin. Double play: Stew- 
art to Light to Dennis; Bonney to 
Heffner; Hedges to Heffner. Struck 
out: by Daub, 0; by Patrizio, 3; by 
Thomas, 8. Base on balls: Off Daub, 
1; off Patrizio, 2; off Thomas, 1. Um- 
pire: Gallagher. 

-o- 



hearers. Mr. Shroyer then gave an 
excellent rendition of the Schubert 
Art song "Erlkonig," bringing forth 
the dramatic quality and contrasting 
moods in a unique manner. His last 
number, "Your Song from Paradise" 
by Sidney Brown, was sung in a de- 
lightful manner and with a tender- 
ness that appealed to the audience. 
Miss Alcesta Slichter assisted very 
capably at the piano. 

O 

Due to the arrangements which 
were made rather suddenly, for a 
Eurydice Choral Club concert at 
Hummelstown, on Monday evening, 
May 12, the Clio Circus was post- 
poned until the following Monday, 
May 19. 



COLLEGE CALENDAR 

i 

Friday, May 16— Y. M. and Y. W.j 

House Party. 
Literary Societies' Meetings. 
Saturday, May 17— Baseball with | 

Dickinson — away. 
Tennis with Dickinson 2:30 — j 

home. | 
Sunday, May 18— Y. M. and Y. W.j 

Meetings. 
Monday, May 19— Clio Circus. 



j THE PENNWAY 
! BARBER SHOP 



N. M. RAUSCH, Prop. 
Annville, Pa. 



FOR KENT 

Furnished Apartment or Rooms for 
married or single students during the 
coming year. For particulars see 

MRS. GEO. HEILMAN, 
457 E. Main St., Annville, Pa. 



M. H. SMITH 

JEWELER 

Watches at Lowest Prices 

Watch and Clock Repairing 
38 Railroad St. Annville, Pa. 



Tuesday, May 20 — Prayer Meet 
ing. 

Wednesday, May 
with Albright— 
Senior-Soph Hike 



i 

21— Baseball j j I 
away. 

i ! 
I 

i 



PHOTOGRAPHS 



LIVE FOREVER 



Ulrichs Studio j 

820 Cumberland St. j 



HW MILLER 



Annville 



HARDWARE 
OF QUALITY 



Pa. 



PRINTINC 



When you want work 
of the better kind see 

HIESTER— The Printer 



TRY OUR HOME MADE 
SANDWICHES 

QUALITY LUNCH 

BREYER'S ICE CREAM 
A Specialty 

7 E. Main St. Annville, p s 



J, F BERLEW 
DEPARTMENT STORE 

Ladies Sandals, White, Black and 
White, Tan, Novelty Shoes, Full 
Fashioned Hosiery. 
Men's Van Heusen Shirts, Sport 
Shoes, Pure Silk Neckwear, Athletic 
Underwear, B. V. D.'s. 



For Quality 

Baked Products 

Patronize 

FINK'S BAKERY 

Main Street 



LARGE AUDIENCES 

ATTEND RECITALS 



(Continued from Page One) 



the difficult "Prelude and Fugue in 
C Fajor" by Bach for her first num- 
ber, and, later on, in concluding • the 
program presented a variety of aes- 
criptive quality and profound emo- 
tional content in the three selections, 
"In the Morning" by Greig, "The 
Swan" by Saint Saens and "Bene- 
diction Nupteale," also by Saint 
Saens. 

Third Recital Tuesday 

The third of the May recitals, an 
exhibition of no ordinary merit, was 
given Tuesday evening, May 13, 
the Engle Conservatory, by Hilda 
Hess, organ, Olive Weigel, piano, and 
Edgar Shroyer, baritone. 

Miss Hess distinguished herself Ir 
her performance, playing with a higl 
order of artistic merit. By her ae 
livery of her first numbers, the third 
movement of the "Sonata Roman- 
tica" by Yon, she at once won her 
large and appreciative audience. She 
played the Bach "Goccata and Fugue 
in D Minor" with admirable style ; 
mastering the music's technical de- 
tails. In her last group she demon- 
strated a wide variety of tone coloi 
and excellent interpretation. This 
group consisted of the . "Bouree et 
Musette" by Karg-Elert, "Fountain 
Reverie" by Fletcher and "Variations 
de Concert" by Bonnet. 

Miss Weigel, another Senior Con- 
servatory student, having a charm- 
ing platform bearing, pleased her 
audience with her individuality' and 
musical sensibility. "In the Sonata 
quasi una Fantasia," Op. 27 No. 1, 
by Beethoven, her technical exactions 
were encompassed with no sugges- 
tion of effort. In "Un Saspiro" by 
Liszt, she ably realized the emotion- 
al content, and "The Eagle" by Mac- 
Dowell and the "Etude Heroique" by 
Leschetizky she rendered with broad 
dramatic sweep andi fire. 

Mr. Shroyer, enthusiastically re- 
ceived by his audience, rendered with 
a pleasing and consistent clarity of 
tone and fluency, three vocal selec- 
tions. In the first, "At Tankerton 
Inn" by Howard Fisher, he gave evi- 
dence of a fine sense of rhythm anu 
a melodic line which captivated his 



HOW ABOUT YOUR f 
COLLEGE EXPENS- I 
ES FOR NEXT j 
YEAR? j 

Write us immediately for a ! 
good money-making proposi- ! 
tion selling (1) college and fra- ] 
ternity jewelry including class ( 
rings, (2) attractive high grade j : 
individual stationery printed to 
customers order, (3) complete 
line of felt and leather goods, 
and (4) all styles of college 
belts carrying buckles with 
or without your college 
colors. In your letteil, state 
which of the above four inter- 
ests you, and be sure to give 
two references and your sum- 
mer address. 

INDIAN SALES AGENCY 
Williamsburg, Va. 



PRINTING 




PUBLICATION. 
BOOKS, CATA 
LOGUES, STATION- 
ERY, CARDS, TAGS, 

ANNVILLE PRINTING 
COMPANY 

ANNVILLE PA. 



WHAT ABOUT YOUR 
GRADUATING GIFTS? 

A large assortment at 

BOLLMANS 

AA South Eighth Street, 
Lebanon, Pa. 



Sale of Book Ends to 
Sell at 

29c a pair 

These Book Ends Are 
Worth From $1.00 to $1.50 
a pair. 



GRIMMS 

COLLEGE BOOK STORE 



S--K 

STUDIO 
24 HOUR 
FILM SERVICE 



D. L SAYLOR & SONS 

Contractors 

LUMBER AND GOAL 

ANNVILLE. PA. 



PARKER FOUNTAIN PENS 

GUARANTEED FUR .LIFE 

Two Pens in One— A Desk Pen and a Pocket Pen. 
Ask To bee Them. 

ESBENSHADE'S BOOK STORE 

38 N. 8th St. -:- -:- Lebanon, Pa. 



-iOFFMAN STEAM PRESS- 
ING 

KEYSTONE HAT CLEANINC. 

STEVE WORNAS 



10 W. Main St. 



Annville, 



HOUSE OF GOOD 
wnnn 



Wm. Penn Highway 



Near Annville 



Meals Served at All I lours 



BANQUETS AND PARTIES 
Our Specialty 



CLOTHING OF QUALITY 

J S BASEHORE 

Lebanon, Pa. 



KREAMER BROS. 

STEINITE RADIOS 
EASY ELECTRIC WASHE R 

COLUMBIA GAS STOVES AND RANGES 

RUGS AND LINOLEUMS 

"House of Better Values" 

™ w u c furniture and undertaking 

328 W. Main St. Phone 6R3 



Annville, Pa- 



—Shaeffer's Lifetime Pens — 

NONE BETTER ABSOLUTELY GUARANTEED 

AN EVERYDAY NECESSITY FOR 
COLLEGE STUDENTS 

The Gift Store of Lebanon 
757-759 Cumberland Street 



HARPEL'S 



M 1 lit 



WHAT COULD BE MORE REFRESHING AFTER A SET 
OF TENNIS THAN AN ICE COLD COCA COLA. 

THE PENNWAY 

OPPOSITE P. O. 
A FULL LINE OF FRESH PASTRY DAILY 



in 

sc 

ec 
af 

in 

Ul 

tl 

Wl 
ill; 



pc 
SI 
a 
SI 
th 
01 
fr- 
ill; 

ed 
wl 
4-1 

Re 
soi 

er 
01- 
dr 
Ja 

Fi: 

\V( 

3-C 

cli 
th, 
flo 

m 
H< 
th, 
on 

da; 



i 

sta 
Ab 
no. 
bit 
All 
Wil 
I 

oft 
led 
an< 
thr 
a } 




SUCCESS TO 
THE NEW SENATE 
AND W. S. G. A. 




Wit (Eolkfliennt 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



GET READY, 
SENIORS! EXAMS 
NEXT WEEK 



VOLUME VI 



ANNVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA, THURSDAY, MAY 22, 1930. 



No. 8. 



NET STARS BAG 
ANOTHER MATCH 



SEEM INVINCIBLE AS 
DICKINSON 
FALLS 



Lebanon Valley's tennis team re- 
peated against Dickinson in another 
interesting match winning by the 
score of 6-3. The contest was play- 
ed on the home courts last Saturday 
afternoon. 

The local netmen found Dickinson 
much easier than the previous Sat- 
urday at Carlisle. The winners of 
the week before had easier going 
while Fink took revenge over his 
man. 

Shroyer, Hertzler, and Dunmoyer 
needed only two sets apiece to dis- 
pose of their respective opponents. 
Shroyer and Rule, Dickinson, put up 
a good battle for the first set which 
Shroyer finally won 9-7. He won 
the second set 6-3. Hertzler won from 
Ohler 6-4, 6-1 and Dunmoyer won 
from Budding 6-2, 6-3 in well played 
matches. 

Fink and Baron, Dickinson, hook- 
ed up in a spirited contest from 
which Fink emerged the victor 6-4, 
4-6, 6-3. Spahr, Dickinson, defeated 
Rank 4-6, 6-2, 6-3. Jacobs, Dickin- 
son, beat Hutchinson, 6-4, 7-5. 

Shroyer and! Hertzler team togeth- 
er to make quick work of Rule and 
Ohler 6-3, 6-3. Huohison and Rank 
dropped their match to Spahr and 
Jacobs 2-6, 6-3, 6-8. Dunmoyer and 
Fink met some stiff competition but 
won from Buddling and Baron 6-2, 
3-6, 6-2. 

The match with Dickinson con- 
cluded all of the home games al- 
though four remain scheduled for 
foreign rourts. On Satdrday Sus- 
quehanna is met at Selinsgrove. 
Next week will be a busy one for 
the tennis team as opponents are met 
°n Monday, Wednesday, and Thurs- 
day afternoon. 

O 

batsmen lose again 
to traditional foe 



Again Lebanon Valley's pitching 
staff failed in the late innings as 
Abr ight won 11-7 Wednesday after- 
no °n, May 21 at Reading. Going 
•nto the sixth inning one run behind, 
Albright pounded in five counters to, 
the game. 
B oth teams hit the ball harl and 
of ten as eleven sife hits were ed- 
ited by each side. "Jap" Albright 
and Bartlet led the slugging with 
hr ee singles apiece, while Roth got 
*e run for Albright. 



Leb 



first 



anon Valley got a run in the 



st inning on a pair of singles. Al- 
n &ht came right back and scored 
Ur runs on a succession of hits 
et »ding i n a triple by Fromm. 

11 the second inning Betz became 

j Vll <l and hit Murphy and "Fuzzy" 

a cks. Albright then came through 

^! th a double and Bartolet followed 

n a three-bagger to tie up the 
re. 

(Continued on Page Four) 



NEW W. S. G. A. BOARD 
TAKES OATH OF OFFICE 



In a very impressive manner on 
the regular chapel period, the newly 
elected officers of the W. S. G. A. 
for the next school year were install- 
ed as a group. 

Dr. Gossard after calling the young 
ladies to the stage, spoke for a Tew 
minutes on the value and need of a 
women's student government associa- 
tion. He stressed the point that they 
had been honored by being chosen 
as representatives of the young 
women to head them in enforcing the 
regulations of the college. Theirs, 
he said, is a great task and it is 
for them to fulfill it to the best of 
their ability. He pleaded to the en- 
tire student body to help in every 
way for these young women to carry 
out} the maintenance of rules and 
ondier. 

After he had dealt with the need 
and necessity for capable, conscien- 
tious workers in this field of govern- 
ment, he formally installed the mem- 
bers, as a board, by administering 
the oath of office. Madeline Shedcty, 
Effie Levan, Caroline Fischer, Dor- 
othy Hafer, Ruth Liller, Hilda D. 
Buckley, Dorothy Garber, and Mar- 
ian May were those who received the 



oath. 



-O- 



T CABINETS HOLD 
SUCCESSFUL PARTY 



PLANS ARE OUTLINED 

FOR COMING 
TERM 



The Y. M. C. A. and the Y. W. C. 
A. Cabinets of Lebanon Valley Col- 
lege enjoyed their annual house 
party at Mt. Gretna last week end. 
The cabinets departed on Friday 
night and returned on Sunday night. 

The men and women upon their 
arrival started to walk about the for- 
ests and around the lake so that they 
could enjoy to the greatest extent 
the sunset, which was indeed very 
beautiful. 

On Saturday morning the real 
work began. It started with a bang 
and that "bang" was directed at tne 
cabinets by the cabinet members. It 
consisted merely of enumerating the 
mistakes of the bodies and thresh- 
ing over them trying to find how to 
weaken the weak spots and 
strengthen the strong ones. 

Each cabinet had: of course its own 
mistakes, but by discussing them 
together the one could learn from the 
other just how it had learned to 
overcome them. 

After this discussion the entire 
company went for a walk out to the 
parade ground where tt was ex- 
pected that they could see the divi- 
sion of the army then stationed 
there go thru their drills. 

There was a discussion held in the 
afternoon which was led by Martin 
Kiehler of Yale Divinity School on 
the purposes of the "Y" and how we 
are falling short. In this discussion 

(Continued on Page 3) 



MEN ELECT SENATE 
FOR 1930-31 TERM 



UNUSUAL TIES MAKE 
SECOND BALLOT 
NECESSARY 



According to the final results ob- 
tained from the second ballot after 
chapel on Tuesday morning, the fol- 
lowing men will serve as the Men's 
benate for tthe 1930-31 term. 

seniors: Uhanes Wise, Kenneth 
itussen, Joe women, William Spang - 
ier, Kusseil Morgan, and Robert 
^nac*K, cuy student representative. 

J uniors: George IN ye, Paui Kin- 
puixs, James Monteitn, Aivin Kin- 
ney, and Newton Burgner, day stu- 
dent. 

sophomores: Chester Goodman, 
W'wOdrow Dellinger, and Luther Say- 
lor, day student. 

The regular election, held last 
Thursday, resulted in three ties, one 
in each class, as follows: 

Seniors: Daub and Spangler. 

Juniors: Kinney and Rawhouser. 

Sophomores: Heilman and) Saylor. 

This unusual situation necessitated 
a second vote, which was taken after 
the regular chapel period on Tues- 
day morning, resulting in the 
results published above. 

O 

UNUSUAL INTEREST IS 

SHOWN IN RECITALS 



The recital of Thursday, May 15, 
given by Leah Miller, soprano, Mil- 
dred Myers, organ, and Alcesta 
Slichter, piano, was one that will 
truly be a memorable event in the 
musical history of the college. 

Miss Myers opened the program in 
a beautiful style by playing the 
Sonata No. 1 (2nd andl 3rd move- 
ments) by Guilmant. The calm and 
deliberateness of Miss Myers in 
bringing out the contrasting moods 
of the two movements was indeed de- 
lightful. In her second number, the 
"Midsummer Night's Dream Over- 
ture" by Mendelssohn, Miss Myers 
played with a rare musical sensibil- 
ity and charm, giving a full signifi- 
cance to the sombre and ominous 
phrases. The last group included in 
Miss Myers' performance contained 
a pleasing variety — the first number. 
"La Vilerse," by Raff being perform- 
ed) in a delicate and clean-cut man- 
ner, the second, "Sea Nymphs" 
(from Sea Sketches) by Stoughton, 
displaying marvelous tone coloring 
and descriptive qualities, and her 
third and last number the "Second 
Concert Studly," by Yon, rising to 
climatic passages in stirring fashion, 
and putting to her credit one of the 
finest exhibitions of organ playing 
heard in a student recital on the 
campus for many years. 

Miss Miller, the second artist to 
appear on the evening's program, 
not only thrilled her audience with 
her vocal brilliance, but charmed 
with her ingratiating personality, 
her attitude of genial friendliness 
(Continued on Page 3) 



Y. M. REPRESENTATIVE 

SPEAKS IN CHAPEL 



The chapel exercises on Monday 
morning, May 19, were conducted by 
Mr. M. D. Keeler, a representative 
of the Y. M. C. A., and at present a 
student in the Union Theological 
Seminary at New York City. Mr. 
Keeler's presence on the campus was 
due to his participation in the dis- 
cussions held during! the week-enid 
house-party of the joint Y. M.-Y. W. 
cabinets at Mt. Gretna, where his 
practical treatmetn of student prob- 
lems was found to be most helpful. 

In the short time allotted to him 
Fr. Keeler pointed out the too-preva- 
lent tendency to neglect religion, the 
need for devoting more attention tc 
the religious side of the character, 
the reasons for the growing neglect 
and practical ways for overcoming 
these harmful tendencies 

The address of Mr. Keller was 
generously seasoned with interesting 
anecdotes anidi witicisms, all illus- 
trative of the central truths of his 
message. An easy style of delivery 
and a self-evident familiarity with 
student prooblems combined to gain 
for him an attentive and apprecia- 
tive audience. 





DICKINSON AGAIN 
TRIPS MYLINMEN 



SIX-INNING 3-0 LEAD 
FAILS TO BRING 
L. V. VICTORY 



The Dickinson nine made it two 
straight over Lebanon Valley at Car- 
lisle last Saturday by winning 7-3. 

Lebanon Valley started strong and 
held a 3-0 lead until the sixth in- 
ning. In the first inning Patrizio 
got a walk to first and later scored 
on a fielder's choice. Two more runs 
were added in the fourth on doubles 
by "Bob" Stewart, Dennis, and 
"Fuzzy" Jacks. After that Shomac 
was invincible allowing only three 
scattered hits. 

Pat went along nicely until the 
sixth inning when he began to weak- 
en. Four hits brought across three 
runs to tie the score. In the next 
frame a single, a triple and a homer 
gave Dickinson a commanding lead 
The final run was added on a home 
run by Hedges in the eighth. 

Hedges was the hitting ace gath- 
ering two singles, a double, and a 
homer in four trips to the plate. 

(Continued on Page Four) 

O 

MORGAN ELECTED PRES. 

OF CHEMISTRY CLUB 



At a brief meeting of the Chemis- 
try Club held on Tuesidlay, the offi- 
cers for the 1930-31 term were elect- 
ed. Following the election, the re- 
tiring President, Mr. Clarence Noll, 
gave a short address, and fhr meet- 
ing was adjourned. The officers are 
as follows: 

President, Russell Morgan; Vlce- 
Presidlent, William Spangler; Secre- 
tary.-Treasurer, Daniel Beck. 



SHEDDY HEADS NEW 
W. S. 6. A. BOARD 



LEVAN TO ASSIST AS 
VICE-PRESIDENT OF 
ASSOCIATION 



A signal honor was conferred upon 
Madeline Sheddy when she was elect- 
ed president of the W. S. G. A. for 
the coming year by the new board 
on Monday, May 19, 1930. 

The board, the members of which 
will preside as a court of justice 
over the errant young maidens of 
the institution, elected the officers 
to head their group from the names 
selected by the vote of the entire stu- 
dent badly of girls. Madeline Sheddy 
received the greatest number of votes 
and so received the position of presi- 
dent of the Women's Student Govern- 
ment Association. 

Miss Sheddy will have an excellent 
opportunity of showing her executive 
skill in the capacity of chief justice 
over those who fail to honor and 
obey the rules of the student asso- 
ciation. 

Miss Sheddy will have very capable 
members on her staff to help her 
bear the trials which come to those 
in office Effie Levan will act as Miss 
Sheddy's righthand "man" in the ca- 
pacity of vice-president of the board 
Dorothy Hafer, as treasurer, will 
handle the finances of the organi- 
zation while Dorothy Garber, in the 
role of secretary, will keep accurate 
account of the activities of the board 
and will keep the girls in the dormi- 
tories posted with the latest news 
concerning its actions. 

Caroline Fischer, Ruth Liller, Hil- 
da D. Buckley and Marian May are 
the remaining members of the board 
who will help in maintaining order 
and decorum among the young ladies. 

The La Vie joins in the wishes of 
many that everyone will cooperate 
with the newly-chosen representatives 
of the women's student government 
in order to make it a worth-while 
organization. 



-o- 



COLLEGE CALENDAR 



Friday, May 23— W. S. G. A. and 
Men's Senate house party. 
Literary Society's meetings. 
Saturday, May 24 — Baseball with 

Ursinus — away. 
Sunday, May 25— Y. M. and Y. 

W. meetings. 
Monday, May 26 — Senior exams _ 
begin. 

Tuesday, May 27 — Baseball with j 
Getysburg — away. 
Prayer meeting. 
Friday, aMy 30 — Memorial Day. j 
Baseball with Albright — home. \ 



-O- 



Yale has taken stringent measures 
to ban the ukelele and saxaphone 
from its corridors. Lebanon Valley 
might profit by similar action. 



PAGE TWO 



LA VIE COLLEGIKNNE, THURSDAY, MAY 22, 1930. 



ESTABLISHED 1926 



A wo«kly publication by the Under 
rr&duate Students of Lebanon 
Valley College 



EDITORIAL STAFF 

Russel Ettcr, '31 Editor-in-Chief 

Ruth Liller, '31 Associate Edito 

R. Roudabush, '31 .... Associate Editor 
R .Morgan, '31 .... Managing Edito 



&EFOBTOEIAL STAFF 

Robert Eshleman, '31 

Madeline Sheddy, '31 

Ruth Shroyer, '32 

Hilda Buckley, '32 

Walter Krumbeigel, '33 

General Reporter 

Mary Goshert, '32 Conservatory 

Robert Rawhouser, '32 Athletic 

Dorothy Garber, '32 Clionia: 

Mary Epply, '32 Delphian 

Percy Clements, '33 Kalozetean 

Fred Mund, '32 Philokosmian 

Edna Early, '31 .... Alumni Reporter 



BUSINESS STAFF 

G. Becker, '31 .... Business Manager 

P. Keene, '32 Asst. Business Manager 

C. Wise, '31 .... Circulation Manager 



FACULTY ADVISORS 

Dr. Paul A. W. Wallace, English Dept. 
Ifisa Mary K. Wallace, English Dept 
Dr. Paul S. Wagner. Math. Dept. 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE. a member 
of the Intercollegiate Newspaper Asso- 
ciation of the Middle Atlantic States. 



Single Copies 10 cents 

Subscription $1.50 per year 



Entered at the Annville, Pa., post- 
office as second class matter under the 
Act of March 3. 1879. 



SUMMER JOBS 



This is the time of the year when 
the question: "What are you going 
to do this summer?" becomes the 
center of discussion on the campus. 
One man plans to go here, another 
there, one at this solary, another at 
that. Even the ladies contribute 
their share to the discussion, all of 
which reminds us the growing 
importance of the spare-time job m 
the life of the college student of to- 
day. 

A constantly g^jrwing proportion 
of students is undertaking to defray 
the expenses of a college course with 
the proceeds of these positions, and 
without the solicitation of any as 
sistance from other sources. That 
the experience so obtained is valu- 
able cannot be questioned, especially 
when we consider that it offers excel- 
lent opportunities for gaining the 
practical outlook — an indispensible 
team-mate for theory. 

More important still is the devel- 
opment of self-reliance and inde- 
pendence in the students who finance 
their own college career. There have 
been in the past and still remain too 
many graduates who face the world 
after graduation in a state of confu- 
sion comparable to the blinkings of 
an owl who is suddenly stirred out 
into the blinding light of the sun at 
noon-day. They have never learned 
to strike out for themselves; some- 
one else has had to stand between 
them and the world, and bear the 
brunt of its annoyances. 

Another fact is self-evident to 
anyone who has taken the time to 
closely observe college students. In 
the vast majority of cases, the man 
who gets the most out of his college 
course is the fellow who has to dig 
for it. He doesn't know what it is 
to have Dad sign a check for him; 
he signs his own. And after its all 
over, there is an added satisfaction 
that comes from knowing that every 
cent's worth of it is the product of 
his own brains andJ brawn. That 
that satisfaction gives the graduate 
an added impetus as he steps into 
some responsible position will 
scarcely be questioned. 

Our own campus is remarkable in 
this respect. Almost without excep- 



extent the women, expenses in whole 
or in part are met with the proceeds 
of summer jobs. We may have to 
substitute, in consequence, an old 
Ford for the traditional collegiate 
roadster; we must forego a host of 
other pleasures and luxuries. But 
we wonder if we are not getting just 
a little bit more out of these four- 
eventful years than they who were 
born with the proverbial silver spoon 
in the mouth? 





HOSPITALITY 



Some time ago we called attention 
to a proposal made by some of the 
students that a course in etiquette 
be introduced on the campus. We're 
back again with a concrete illustra- 
tion to prove our point that some 
such training is badly needed. And 
how! 

Last Wednesday afternoon, a 
steady downpour of rain necessitated 
the calling of the baseball game and 
tennis match scheduled with Susque 
hanna. The men from Selinsgrove 
arrived nevertheless in the early 
part of the afternoon, and if they 
didn't carry with them the impres 
sion that Lebanon Valley is the 
worst "dump" this side of No- 
Matter-Where it wasn't the fault of 
our men. 

With the exception of a handful 
who were more daring and adven- 
turous than the rest, all those fel 
lows had the privilege of seeing 
while on the campus was the back of 
the Administration Building and the 
inside of the dining hall. And when 
they reached the latter place, there 
wasn't a single man in evidence who 
had gumption enough to take the ini 
tiative and conduct them to thetir 
places with the cordiality that even 
the most elementary principles of 
hospitality would demand. 

Of course it's more comfortable to 
slouch down in a chair and doze or 
chat away in the dorm on an after 
noon like that, much more comfort- 
able than to fulfil the duties of a 
host, but it is also a good deal more 
selfish. We are not certain as to 
whether or not the LA VIE ex- 
changes with the publication of Sus- 
quehanna, but if it does, we want to 
apologize frankly for our breach of 
good manners, and express a sin- 
cere hope that the men of Lebanon 
Valley will never again be guilty of 
such utter thoughtlessness. 



CAMPUS CUSTOMS 



part of the rich body of Lebanon 
Valley tradition, and may we all join 
in making their efficacy a sufficient 
justification for their retention and 
enforcement. 





Among Our Seniors 



FROSH THOUGHTS 



CIRCUS DAY 



The time for the social promotion 
of the men on the campus has finally 
arrived, and accordinglv the frosh 
have become self-confident sopho- 
mores, the sophs, have graduated to 
muzzies" and bare heads, and the 
juniors, to whom the promotion 
means least of all, to the rapidly de- 
creasing prerogatives of the tradi- 
tional "dignified 1 senior". 

As we look back upon our own 
under-olassman days, we can recal 1 
a vivid picture of our wounded dig- 
nity as one generous slice after an- 
other of what is called, in campus 
parlance, "cockiness" was lopedl off 
of our verdant dispositions. My, how 
we did enjoy to revel in the sym- 
pathy of the home-folks, and others 
who entertained their own opinions 
of "these here colleges and their 
tom-foolery." 

But how do we view the matter 
now? Well, to be perfectly frank 
we're inclinedl to think the exper- 
ience was good for us. We learned 
among others, one very good lesson 
•to "grin and bear it" when petty 
annoyances arrived via the Men'? 
Senate, the upper-classmen, and 
worst of all, the ultra-cockney sopho- 
mores. And if there's one man we 
always will admire, it's the fellow 
who can take his share of the ragged 
edge of life without whining. 



So here's to the campus customs! 
tion among the men and to a large May they continue to be a permanent 



Going to a circus, or receiving 
your first Baby Ingersoll watch in a 
Christmas stocking may not be such 
momentous occasions to every per- 
son, but to me, they have been out 
standing. Particularly, do I visual 
ize my first circus. 

As my memory is freshened, by 
poking the dying embers, I recall the 
words of my uncle, the evening pre- 
vious to Circus Day in Harrisburg, 
Pennsylvania. At the supper table 
he asked his younger brother — my 
uncle, also — and me if we would like 
to see the circus. What an outburst 
of enthusiasm, which naturally was 
followed by the paternal reprimand 
for such rowdyism at the table! 
With the tickets purchased and the 
transportation problem solved, 
everything was in readiness for the 
on coming day of days. The good 
news was so delightful that we had 
to tell the neighborhocd and our 
friends, and we spent a restless 
night imagining what we might see 
and hear. We arose simultaneously 
with the sun, and hurried to be the 
first of the family downstairs. 

Soon breakfast was over, and we 
were on our way. Naturally, we ar- 
rived in the city before the time of 
the street parade. Therefore, in or- 
der not to waste such valuable time, 
my uncle took us about the city. Es- 
pecially, do I recall our walk through 
the Capital Park, where we fed nuts 
and goodies to squirrels while the 
pigeons flew around us. 

At last, a band was heard, and we 
knew that the parade had started. 
While we viewed the parade, we ask- 
ed my uncle mftny questions regard- 
'nr this, that, and the other thing. 

After the questions and the spec- 
kle of bands, calliope, clowns, In- 
dians, Cowboys and Cowgirjs, and 
what-nots, we hastened to the circus 
grounds. As usunl, we had to have 
balloons, pink lemonade, and "hot- 
dogs" before anything else would 
attract their attention. Now their 
wants and fancies were satisfied, and 
they were willing to see more. 

The first move placed us within 
the tent known as the Side Show. 
While there, we were dumbfounded 
■With the sight of such a "fat-woman" 
and a "skinny man". Also imagine 
how hird we tried to figure out 
where the sword went that did not 
ut the throat of the "sword swal- 
lower", or why the "snake charmer" 
wanted a big snake for a necklace. 
Here, likewise, were some deep 
problems t be solved as well as 
questions to asked. 

After the Side Show, we proceed- 
ed to the "Big Tent" where we wit- 
nessed the stunts of the acrobats on 
the swings, the antics of the clowns, 
the girl jumping through a hoop 
while astride the running horses, the 
act of trained seals, and several 
other numbers. The outstanding act 
of all was the "old flivver" that ran 
on its rear wheels while the front 
wheels were free of the ground. 
Possibly, this was true because the 
clowns had to have their fun, and 
their fun was everything t the kid- 
dies. 

During a'.l this excitement, we did 
not lose or burst our balloons. Some- 
how or the other, we held on to them 
all the way home, and was going in 
the yard when, alas! my balloon took 
to the air. Oh my! This incident 
was too sad to laugh at! I ran to 
the back door and screamed for mv 




GLEN EMANUEL BENDIGO 



Among our seniors, to whom we 
pay tribute, is Glen Bendigo, a gen- 
tleman from Orwin, Pa. During his 
four years he 'Ben' has accomplished 
much in adding to the laurels of our 
Alma Mater and hence brought the 
wreath also to his own brow. Among 
those accomplishments are, his 
touhedown against Brown, when we 
defeated the Rhode Islanders in 
1927; his backstopping in baseball 
for three years, his acting in 'The 
Seven Keys to Baldpate' the Philo 
play, and his trombone playing. 

Glen belongs to the Philokosmian 
Literary Socitey * * * Played foot- 
ball and baseball 1, 2 and 3 * * * 
Belonged to Student-Faculty Coun- 
cil 3 * * * Played class basketball 
1, 2, 3, 4 * * * and served on Anni- 
versary Program 3, 4. 



MARY ELIZABETH AX 



Miss Ax, a verbose young lady 
from Lebanon is the girl whom we 
honor this week. Surely Mary is a 
likable girl with smiles galore and 
naturally we can't dislike a girl who 
smiles. Nevertheless she also has 
her serious moments which no doubt 
are the cause of her high marks. 

Mary, with many others of her 
class, intends to teach next year. She 
is majoring in Latin. Among her 
accomplishments at this institution 
are: Debating team 1, 2 of which she 
was captain during her second year; 
assistant in Education 4; and was 
the vice-president of Readers' Club 4. 



mother who came, in great haste, 
thinking I was hurt, only to find her 
boy bewildered and crying over a 
balloon that was soaring heaven- 
ward. 

Everything had been enjoyable and 
and interesting throughout the day, 
excepting the loss of my cherished 
balloon. Subsequently, my day had 
been ruined, and has remained ever 
after as an outstanding incident or 
experience in my life. 

By George Nye. 

O 

The standard of certification of the 
modlern language teachers in high 
schools will be raised by the recom- 
mendations that were passed by the 
council of the State Modern Lan- 
guage Association which met in liar 
risburg recently. As the ruling now 
stands 18 hours are required in or- 
der to teach a modern language. The 
council wants the Boandi of Education 
to interpret this as 18 hours that 
have been taken beyond the second- 
ary school. 



O 

The Histology class at Bucknell is 
prodlucing red, white, and blue rats. 
The histologists take a white rat and 
inject trepan and methylene blues, 
and congo and neutral reds beneath 
the rat's skin. The stains are car- 
ried by the bloodstream throughout 
the body. In a short time the rats 
have blue ears, eyes, tails, and 
feet. But these colors are only vis- 
ible after the rat has been chloro- 
formed and the tissues preserved and 
mounted on the slides. 

O 




Requiring students to take five 
years of post-high school work in or- 
der to secure a license to teach was 
the principal question argued at the 
annual spring meeting of the Asso- 
ciation of College Presidents of the 
State of Pennsylvania held in Read>- 
ing on Friday, May 16. 



Although no definite conclusions 
were drawn by the educators in 
their open forum, many ideas were 
exchanged on this somewhat evolu- 
tionary idea that has sprung up re- 
garding education. The "five year 
level" requirement for the teaching 
profession would demand a Master's 
degree from all candidates. The 
question is still open for debate and 
at the close of the meeting still rest- 
edi with the educators as a proposal 
only. It is unlikely that any further 
discussion will be had on this sub- 
ject before the fall meeting of the 
association. 

Dr. Gossard and Professor Grimm 
attended the meeting as the repre- 
sentatives of this college. 



Dr. Gossard was the guest of 
honor Wednesday night at the 
meeting and banquet in the Lincoln 
Hotel, Reading, of the catechetical 
class of St. Andrew's Reformed 
Church. Dr. Charles E. Roth, the 
minister of this church which is one 
of the largest in Reading, is a fre- 
quent host to the Dr. Gossard upon 
church occasions of this type. 



Dr. Gossard andi Professor Grimm 
represented Lebanon Valley at the 
dedication on Friday, May 16, of the 
two buildings recently erected on the 
Albright College campus in Read- 
ing, Pa. 

Albright College hadf invited to its 
campus for this epochal occasion the 
presidents of all the colleges an 
universities in this state. A large rep- 
resentation from this group met ° n 
the campus and added much to the 
prestige of Albright's celebration 
this achievement in her progress- 



Peanut shells have found a use ^ 
They are being mixed with old h ur 



lap, phenol, and creosote, the < 



stituents of a new plastic mater 
that is strong, resilient, and dur 
It is expected that this new ™ aieV \t 
will become a real competitor 



steel and wood in furniture ma 



king" 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, M AY 22, 1930. 



PAGE THREE 




PHI LAMBDA SIGMA 



"A COLLEGE JOKE TO CURE THE 'BLUES' " 

— Jonathan Swift. 



The Mt. Joy Boy Friend — It didn't hurt at all to have my tooth pulled. 

Ede — You had a local anaesthetic? 

B. F. — Yes, we got him from Lancaster. 

—LVC— 

It's about time for someone to write a poem entitled, "The Face in the 
Tabloid Newspaper." 

— LVC— 

Rettew (watching Hughes mowhawk) — Do you believe in Christ's feed- 
ing of the 5000 ? 

Hughes — Sure, I do! 

Rettew — Boy, had you been on the lot, there wouldn't have been 12' 
baskets of food left. 

— LVC— 

We're mad at fortune-tellers. One told us we would receive several 
interesting letters, and we rushed home and were served alphabet soup! 

— LVC— 

Charlie — Is Skee popular at home? 

Dean — Popular — say, buddie, when he came back to school 23 girls went 
back into circulation. 

— LVC— 

WHACHT? 

A foolish young man with a yacht 
Sailed south when the weather grew hacht. 
"I'm anxious to see 
An iceberg," said he. 
But he wasn't in quite the right spacht. 

—LVC— 

For that lousy feeling — scratch! 

— LVC— 

1st Modern Youth — Why do you carry a nest of moths around with you ? 
2nd M. Y. — I put them in the girls' parachutes and don't them about it 
till they threaten to drop out and walk home. 

— LVC— 

Dean — Yes, we have five more courses planned for next semester. 

Alumnus— But won't that increase the number flunking; 

Lean — Oh, no. These courses are specially designed for football players. 

— LVC— 

Ruth — We're as far as "Redemption" in Bible. How far are you? 
Evancoe — Oh, we're past "Redemption." 

— LVC— 

B ELIEVE IT OR NOT— 

Alcesta Schlicter is reducing! 
Becker has joined the "Love Pirates." 
Etter once said in Bible Class, "I don't know." 
Moose Morgan has a girl friend going to Smith Brothers. 
Any time a modern old maid looks under the bed she expects to find a 
r oadway columnist there 



The regular literary session of 
Philo was held on Friday, May 16. 
The -active chaplain being absent, 
Paul Keene conducted the devotional 
exercises. The opening number on 
the program was a speech by John 
Hughes. He talked extensively on 
the topic, "High Points in a Busy 
Man's Life", and as usual he won 
over his audience by his jovial 
loquacity. The following number 
was a humorous talk by Charles 
Wise. He talked on "Wise Cracks" 
in which he entertained his audience 
with a rapid fire of jokes. Earl 
Wolf and Paul Evancoe then gave a 
dialogue entitled "Bows and Woes". 
The program continued with several 
piano selections by Clinton Allen. He 
chose for rendition selections from 
Shubert. Oscar Stambaugh then 
gave the Critic's report, and a well 
balanced program came to a close. 

O ■ 

DELTA LAMBDA SIGMA 



UNUSUAL INTEREST IS 

SHOWN IN RECITALS 



Wd 



A f ew 



A hick town is a place where the Sunday paper can be lifted: with one 



—LVC— 



exaggerations about college — 
The width of the trousers of most Freshmen. 
The number of girls kidnapped from Smith College. 
The harm that a course in Psychology can do. 
The amount of liquor consumed at football games 
The number of college graduates who have become bond salesmen. 
The absent-mindedness of college profs. 
The misanthropic qualities of college deans. 
]. The popularity among students of Greta Garbage, trench coats, inter- 
t nea r translation, D. H. Lawrence, Old Golds, Helen Kane's phonograph 
^ords, g i n> u k e ie S) Nietche, striped sweaters, and H. T. Mencken. 



At 12:50 P. M., Wednesday noon, 
the members of Delphian Literary 
Society held a brief business session, 
at which time nominations for fall 
term officers took place. The nomi- 
nees for the various places of honor 
were as follows: 

President — Dorothy Hafer, Effie 
'Le Van. Vice President — Madeline 
Sheddy, Ruth Liller. Treasurer — 
Hilda Buckley, Elizabeth Ulrich. 
Recording Secretary — Edith Fields, 
Glaidsys Hershey. Corresponding 
Secretary — Anna Wolfe, Mary Bix- 
ler. Pianist — Anna Garber, Helen 
Peterson. Warden — "Flo." Grimm, 
Gloria La Vanture, Augusta Trachte. 

O 

WHAT'S BECOME OF THE 
LITERARY SOCIETIES 



Page Diogenes and his lantern (or 
"Flashlight Clara," if you prefer), 
bound in search of a Literary (?) So- 
ciety meeting. Kalo hall is darkened 1 ; 
the brethren have utterly deserted 
their rendezvous. From Philo he de 
parts discouraged, repelledi by a dis- 
interested and apathetic handful of 
"the faithful." Long days ago were 
the sounds of feminine merriment 
banished from the once-ringing halls 
of Clio. Andi Delphian too has re 
tired from the scene of her accus- 
tomed festivities. 

The ancient philosopher is grieved 

"And is my search, then, to be un- 
rewarded?" he muses. "Have these 
organizations, with their wealth of 
tradition wrapped! round them like a 
shroud, passed on beyond all recall?" 

His only answer is a sheet of 
paper, borne to his feet from some 
corner by the May breeze. Despon 
dently he stoops down and picks up 
the crumpledi sheet. Half heartedly 
he brushes off the dirt that has ac- 
cumulated upon its surface, and 
which marks it as a recent resident 
of the common waste-basket and 
garbage can of the campus — the 
lawn immediately under the front 
windows of the Men's dormitory. He 
reads the paper, then sighs and turns 
away, for all he is able to discover 
is a long list of unprepared or post- 
poned programs and circuses, and 
items of unfinished business. 

Finally a gleam of hope brightens 
his countenance as he is struck by a 
happy thought. 

"I have heard that there was once 
a valley of dry bones. And a prophet 
prophesied to them, and a wind blew 
upon them, so that they lived again 
Might not the miracle be repeated ? 
But alas!", and his face was again 
overspread with gloom, "Where can 
we find a prophet?" 

Can anyone suggest a way out of 
the poor old gentleman's dilema? 
This space has been wandering 
around like the evil spirits who were 
in search of dry places, seeking for 
Society News, and finding none. 



(Continued from Page One) 
and her perfect poise. Singing for 
her first group three songs, "Song of 
the Soul" by Carl Breil, "The 
Cuckoo" by Lehmann, and "What is 
a Song," by Curran, Miss Miller dis- 
played a voice of roundness and 
firmness of . texture, proving her 
ability as an exponent of widely 
diverse styles of interpretation. In 
her secondl appearance, Miss Miller 
gave a creditable rendition of "I've 
Seen the Swallows," by Dell Acqua ; 
hitting the high notes with singular 
ease. For her last group, she sang 
four numbers, "Shepherd, Play a 
Little Air," by Stickles, "Spring's 
Awakening," by Warford, "Last 
Night I Heard the Nightingale," Oy 
Salter, and "Ah, Love But a Day," 
by H. H. Beach. In all these, Miss 
Miller exemplified! a high type of 
vocal work, and her ability to pro- 
ject the moods of her songs made the 
recital one of unique interest. Miss 
Myers provided artistic support at 
the piano. 

Miss Slichter, an enjoyable pianist, 
gave for her first number the Wald- 
stein Sonata (First movement) of 
Beethoven, playing not only with 
force and! briliance, but in a manner 
that testified to her profound sym- 
pathy for and understanding of the 
subjective content of the music. For 
her second group, Miss Slichter piay- 
edl the same finished technique and 
fine artistry, as well as with an un- 
usual degree of color, three more 
modern numbers, "Le Cathedral 
Englontie," by Debussy, "A Wattean 
Paysage," by Godowsky, and "La 
Dance de Puck," by Debussy. 

Exceptional Talent Is Displayed 

A recital of unusual interest was 
given by Myrle Turby, soprano; 
Hilda Hess, piano, and Alcesta 
Slichter, violin, in Engle Hall on 
Tuesday evening, May 20. The inter- 
ested audience showed great appre- 
ciation of their art and gave evi- 
dence of their enjoyment of the var- 
ied abilities of the performers. 

Miss Turby possesses a voice of 
unusual beauty and true lyric qual- 
ity. She is plentifully endowed with 
temperament and displayed taste and 
sounidl ideas of style. She gave a 
most delicate interpretation of the 
old English group. In the Schubert 
group with its contrasting lyric 
moods she proved a fine exponent of 
the none too easy art of "lieder" 
singing. After a most effective read- 
ing of "Depuris le Jour" from "Lou- 
ise", Miss Turby closed the program 
with a group of modern American 
songs; two of them iddsplaying t^e 
more dramatic qualities while the 
latter ones were sung in a lighter 
vein. 

Miss Hess, a senior who made 
such an admirable appearance as or- 
ganist a week ago, is also a pianist 
of no little reputation. She plays 
with much authority, sincerity and 
flexibility of tone shading. Her tone 
was particularly adapted' to the at- 
mospheric quality necessary for the 
more modern composition of De- 
bussy and Rachmaninoff. The more 
contemplating mood was easily dem- 
onstrated in the Reverie and 
Romance, while xhe Minstrels repre- 
sented! humor in music. The bril- 
liant Polichinele was a most effective 
close to her part of the program. 

Miss Slichter, another senior, has 
shown herself to be a most versatile 
artist having appeared on other 
programs as soprano soloist, pianist 
and now violinist. She plays with 
ease, much intelligence and fine tech- 
nic. She was at her best in style of 
the Handel Larghetto, played with 
great breadth, good tone andl fine 
interpretation. The Valse and Gypsy 
Dance gave her opportunity to dis- 
play the intricacies of the lighter 
dance forms. 



Miss Thompson was a most syin-' 
pathic accompanist for the Misses 
Turby and Slichter and dleserves 
much credit for the evening's per- 
formance. 

O 

"Y" CABINETS HOLD 

SUCCESSFUL PARTY 



(Continued from Page One) 

it was brought out that perhaps our 
Christian Associations were a little 
too self-centered, and not broad 
enough to fill the purpose for which 
they were originally intended. 

That evening the group went up to 
the outskirts of Mt. Gretna and af- 
ter building a bonfire indulged in a 
marshmallow toast. 

Sunday morning found the stu- 
dents in a worship service which on 
account of inclement weather had to 
be held indoors. 

Immediately after this service the 
group entered into a discussion on 
the plans for the Christian Associa- 
tions for next year. Many plans were 
discussed but nothing definite was 
reached until a second meeting was 
held after dinner. The group at that 
time decided to follow certain ideas 
and ideals which were brought out. 
Many practical problems were dis- 
cussed and many suitable plans were 
adopted. 

The conference or rather week-end 
party ended and: every one returned 
to the campus with new ideas about 
the work of the cabinets and new 
plans for next year. 

O 

DR. P. E. PENICK 

ADDRESSES STUDENTS 



When a minister introduces him- 
self as a "radical", he is certain to 
catch the immediate attention and 
curiosity of his audience. Such was 
the explanation given of himself by 
Dr. R. E. Penick, a United Brethren 
minister from the western part of 
the state, when he addressed! the stu- 
dents in chapel on Thursday morn- 
ing, May 16. 

Dr. Penick gave proof of the repu- 
tation which has become attached to 
his name by relating an experience 
he had with tthe association of min- 
isters in his own loaclity. It appears 
that Dr. Penick read a paper at a 
recent session of these gentlemen. 
Afterward one member of the organ- 
ization toldi Dr. Penick that he had 
always heard the doctor was radical, 
but now he was convinced. 

As an alumnus of Otterbein Col- 
lege and a gentleman who has re- 
tained the spirit of youth by asso- 
ciating with young people, Dr. Pen? 
ick is thoroughly aware of the trend 
the opinion of youth is taking. Dr. 
Penick won the further good-will of 
his aud/ience when he proved he 
knew the student opinion regarding 
chapel speakers. The students from 
Otterbein, Dr. Penick admitted, told 
him that nine out of ten chapel 
speakers there were ministers, and 
what Otterbein wanted were lawyers, 
dioctors, and other professionals to 
address them. 

To avoid being one of the "nine 
ministers," Dr. Penick used the re- 
mainder of his allotted time in a vig- 
orous and helpful talk on what col- 
lege actually dioes for a student. He 
related some recent statistics com- 
piled which showed that seven per 
cent of the graduates claim their 
greatest benefits were derived from 
their studies, seventeen percent cred- 
ited) the associations they formed, 
but thirty-six percent valued most 
the inspiration obtained and contact 
had with their professors. 



PAOE lOUlt 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, MAY 22, 1930. 



DICKINSON AGAIN 

TRIPS MYLINMEN 



(Continued from Page One) 
The box score: 

LEBANON VALLEY 

AB. R. H. 0. A 



1 

2 

1 1 



Shortlidge, If 4 

Patrizio, p 3 11 

Albright, cf 5 

Light, 2b 4 

Stewart, ss 4 

Daub, rf 4 

Murphy, c 3 

Dennis, lb 4 

Jacks, 3b 3 

Trezise x 1 




1 
3 
4 
1 
2 
2 

1 1 10 
112 
10 



Totals 35 3 8 24 11 

x Batted for Jacks in ninth. 

DICKINSON 

AB. R. H. O. A 



Bonney, lb 4 1 

Foley, ss 4 

Heffner, 2b 4 1 

Shomac, p 4 1 

Dawson, 3b 4 2 

Tete, rf 4 

Hedges, cf 4 2 4 



5 
2 
3 


1 
3 

Biddle, If 4 13 

Kohnstein, c 4 10 



Totals 36 7 11 27 6 

L. V. C 10020000 0—3 

Dickinson 00000331 x— 7 

Two base hits — Stewart, Dennis, 
Jacks, Shomac, Hedges. Three base 
hit — Heffner. Home Runs — Dawson, 
Hedges. Bases on balls — Off Sho- 
mack, 2; Patrizio 1. Struck out — 
By Shomack, 10; Patrizio 2. Um- 
pire — Miller. 

O 

BATSMEN LOSE AGAIN 

TO TRADITIONAL FOE 



(Continued from Page One) 
Albright added another run on its 
turn to bat but Patrizio's single, 
S'-tewart's sacrifice and Dennis' single 
again tied the game. It remained 
that way until the fifth when Albright 
got another run. Lebanon Valley 
soon made up for that by collecting 
three hits for two more runs to forgf 
ahead for the last time. The five 
run blow up in the last half of the 
sixth decided the game. There war 
no further scoring after that inn- 
ing. 

Every man on Albright's team 
scored at least one run and all bui 
Hudson and Hatton got a hit. 
Lebanon Valley 

ab r b 

Shortlidge, If 3 1 

Albright, cf 5 3 3 

Bartolet, rf 4 3 

Light, 2b 4 2 

Patrizio, p 3 1 1 

Daub, p 10 

Stewart, ss 4 

Dennis, lb 4 2 

Murphy, c 3 10 

Jacks, 3b 110 

Tresize, 3b 10 

Totals 33 7 11 

Albright 

ab r h 

Crittender, cf 4 11 

Purnell, 2b 4 12 

Karlip, 3b 4 2 1 

Roth, ss 4 12 

Fromm, If 4 2 1 

Hudson, lb 3 10 

Vickery, rf 5 12 

Hatton, c 5 10 

Betz, p, 4 12 

Total 37 11 11 

L. V. C. 1 3 1 2 0—7 
Albright 41001500 x— 11 

Two base hits, Albright 2. Three 
baseh its, Bartolet, Fromm. Home 
run, Roth. Struck out-by Patrizio, 1; 
by Daub, 1; by Betz 2. Base on balls 
off Patrizio 5; off Daub 1; off Betz 3. 
Hit by pitcher- by Betz 2. 



BIOLOGY STUDENTS 

VISIT LABORATORIES 



The Freshman Biology classes 
under the direction of Professor 
Light made a most interesting trip 
to the Gillilandl Laboratories in 
Marietta last Monday and Tuesday 
afternoons. These laboratories are 
employed in the manufacture of 
serums used as preventives and 
curatives for many contagious and 
toxic diseases. 

Two guidles, supplied through the 
courtesy of the establishment, took 
charge of the groups and gave an 
adequate explanation of the process- 
es required for the production of the 
serums. The groups were conducted 
through each department and allow- 
edl to observed the bio-chemists in 
action, in various divisions having 
the opportunity to hear the head 
give a resume of the operations per- 
formed there. Of special interest 
were the Pasteur Laboratories where 
the Rabies Vaccine was prepared 1 , 
the T. B. Labs where the Tuberculins 
were prepared, the incubating rooms 
where the bacteria were grown, and 
the filtering rooms where the vac- 
cines were isolated. The technique 
of these several dtepartments was 
further explained and demonstrated. 
In adition to the laboratories, the 
students were shown through the 
stables where the horses, heifers, j 
dogs, rabbits, guinea-pigs, and white) 
mice were kept. These animals are 
usedi in various capacities in the pro- 
duction and testing of the serums. 

The trip was made by machine and 
partaken by practically all of the 
biology students. The influence of 
Miss Peck, a native of Marietta, was 
nstrumental in securing the courte- 
ous attention received. In view of 
h ,he fact that the production of 
serums is of major importance in 
medicine, the visit to these laborator- 
es was of much practical benefit. 



PIANOS • 

PLAYER PIANOS 

PLAYER ROLLS 
VICTOR RADIOS 

VICTROLAS 

VICTOR RECORDS 
SHEET MUSIC 

Miller Music Store 

738 Cumberland Street 
Lebanon, Pa. 



FOR RENT 

Furnished Apartment or Rooms for 
married or single students during the 
coming year. For particulars see 

MRS. GEO. HEILMAN, 
457 E. Main St., Annville, Pa. 



PHOTOGRAPHS 

LIVE FOREVER 

Ulrich's Studio 

820 Cumberland St. 



M. H. SMITH 

JEWELER 

Watches at Lowest Prices 
Watch and Clock Repairing 
38 Railroad St. Annville, Pa. 



PRINTING 



PUBLICATION. 
BOOKS, CATA 
LOGUES, STATION 
ERY, CARDS, TAGS, 
ETC. 

AMILLE PRINTING 
COMPANY 




ANNVILLE 



P/-V 



H W MILLER 



AnnvilW 



HARDWARE 
OF QUALITY 



Pa. 



PRINTING 

When you want work 
of the better kind see 

HIESTER— The Printer 



J. P BERLEW , 

DEPARTMENT STORE 

Ladies Sandals, White, Black and) 
White, Tan, Novelty Shoes, Full. 
Fashioned Hosiery. 
Men's Van Heusen Shirts, Sport 
Shoes, Pure Silk Neckwear, Athletic 
Underwear, B. V. D.'s. 



S--K 

STUDIO 
24 HOUR 
FILM SERVICE 



E. J. SNAVELY AND COMPANY 

UMBRELLAS, LUGGAGE and SPORTING GOODS 
ATHLETIC EQUIPMENT 
628 Cumberland St. 
LEBANON. PENNA. 



PARKER FOUNTAIN PENS 

GUARANTEED FOR LIFE 

Two Pens in One— A Desk Pen and a Pocket Pen. 
Ask To See Them. 

ESBENSHADE'S BOOK STORE 

38 N. 8th St. -:- -:- Lebanon, Pa. 



CLOTHING OF QUALITY 

JSBASEHORE 



Lebanon, Pa. 



WHAT ABOUT YOUR 
GRADUATING GIFTS? 



A large assortment at 



BOLLMANS 

South Eighth Street, 
Lebanon, Pa. 



TRY OUR HOME MADE 
SANDWICHES 

QUALITY LUNCH 

BREYER'S ICE CREAM 
A Specialty 

7 E. Main St. Annville, p a 



For Quality 



Baked Products 



Patronize 



FINK'S BAKERY 

Main Street 



Sale of Book Ends to 
Sell at 

29c a pair 

These Book Ends Are 
Worth From $1.00 to $1.50 
a pair. 



COLLEGE BOOK STORE 



D. L SAYLOR & SON 

Contractors 

LUMBER AND COAL 

ANNVILLE. PA. 



Fine assortment of Watches, Rings, 

Chains, & etc. 
New Century Chiming Grandfather 
Clocks 

LIGHT'S JEWELRY STORE 
51 West Main St. 



CHEFS 

HOUSE OF GOOD 
i?nnn 



Wm. Penn Highway 
Near Annville 



Meals Served at All Hours 
Our Specialty 

BANQUETS AND PARTIES 



KREAMER BROS. 



STEINITE RADIOS 
EASY ELECTRIC WASHER 
COLUMBIA GAS STOVES AND RANGES 
RUGS AND LINOLEUMS 
"House of Better Values' 
FURNITURE AND UNDERTAKING 
328 W. Ma.n St. Phone 6R3 



Annville, P a - 




Shaeffer's Lifetime Pens — 

NONE BETTER ABSOLUTELY GUARANTEED 

AN EVERYDAY NECESSITY FOR 
COLLEGE STUDENTS 

j j A T) D17T >C ^ e ^* Store of Lebanon 
JlI J\MVrCjLi O 757-759 Cumberland Street 



WHAT COULD BE MORE REFRESHING AFTER A SET 
OF TENNIS THAN AN ICE COLD COCA COLA. 

THE PENNWAY 

opposite p. o. 
A FULL LINE OF FRESH PASTRY DAILY 



L 



1 



its 

DM 

Co 

SC( 

he 
bu 
pe 
ou 

cri 
to 
fe( 
th 
av 

foi 
tw 

W( 

se 

fr 
Tt 

by 

av 
a 

c-: 

12 

th 
Tl- 
M 

Be 



to 
de 
to 
H« 



pr 
of 
m 
hi 

Wi 



LA VIE WISHES 
YOU AN ENJOYABLE 
VACATION 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



FAREWELL 
AND BEST WISHES 
TO THE SENIORS 



VOLUME VI 



ANNVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA, THURSDAY, MAY 29, 1930. 



No. 9. 



MORAVIAN YIELDS 
TOTEMS MEN 

L v. WINS SEVENTH TILT 
DESPITE STRONG 
OPPOSITION 



Lebanon Valley's tennis team took 
its seventh victory out of eight 
matches at the expense of Moravian 
College on Monday afternoon by the 
score of 4-2. 

The match was played at Bethle- 
hem in weather that was anything 
but favorable for tennis. The tem- 
perature was too cold to play with- 
out wearing a sweater. 

The games were played on con- 
crete tennis courts which were new 
to our men. However it did not af- 
fect their game as they swept aside 
the strong opposition put up by Mor- 
avian. 

Lebanon Valley won three out of 
four singles and split even in the 
two doubles. Many of the matches 
were hard fought affairs causing 
several long sets. 

Shroyer, of Lebanon Valley, won 
from Hoffman, Moravian, 6-2, 6-1. 
This was the easiest victory scored 
by the winners. 

Hertzler won from Meinert, Mor- 
avian, in straight sets, but only after 
a hard battle. He won the first set 
6-3 but had to play twenty-four 
games before taking the second set 
12-10. 

Donmoyer was hard pressed al- 
though he won in straight sets" also. 
The score of his match, with Grams, 
Moravian, was 6-4, 9-7. 

Pink could not get started against 
Bolman, Moravian, and consequently 
lost 2-6, 0-6. 

Both of the doubles were carried 
to three sets before the outcome was 
decided. After losing the first one 
to Meinert and Grams, Shroyer and 
Hertzler cut loose their attack and 

i Continued on Page 4) 
O 



PLANTING OF CAMPUS 

SHRUBBERY IS BEGUN 



The execution of the plans for the 
beautifying the campus recently ap- 
proved and published by the Board 
of Trustees, was begun on Tuesday 
^orning by workmen from the Berry 
hill Nursery of Harrisburg, Pa. The 
Work is expected to be well under 
w ay by the time of Commencement. 

/Work was started Tuesday in the 
^cinity of the entrance, and on the 
jaw n i n f ront of the Administration 
gilding. The planting of rows of 
Rubbery on both sides of the path 
^nich runs between these two points 
* s a distinct improvement. Those who 

av e observed that part of the work 
hlc b has already been completed 
Hk* Unan i |r nous in their approval of 
of e Program which, both in the way 
k botanical interest and added 
^auty, ; s eX p ec ted to furnish quite 
^ ^rprise to the friends and formet 
^uaintances of Lebanon Valley a"s 
gather to witness the Com- 
^ er icement exercises during the 
eek of June the eighth. 



FROSH WIN DIAMOND 

VICTORY OVER SOPHS 



Last Thursday afternoon, May 21, 
the iTesnmen baseball team defeated 
tne oopnomore aggregation Dy tne 
score 01 10 to 5. 'xne game was play- 
cU under ±deai conditions, but never- 
theless only a small group of loyal 
supporters witnessed tne contest. 

Aii tnrougn tne game tne Trosh 
snowed superior bail playing, giving 
tneir pitcner, tttone, good support, 
wniie tne Soph pitcner iviontietn, re- 
ceived anything but substantial back- 
ing. Xne outcome of the contes 
quite upset tne 'dopesters' as tney 
cenceded the second year men to be 
tne better club. 

In the very first inning the Frosh 
pushed two men across the plate 
wmle the Sopns did not score until 
the fifth. Joy tnis time the 33 's were 
ahead by six runs, in the sixth lap 
the FrosU managed to get two more 
runs but here the 32's outscored them 
by getting three markers. However 
m the final round the Frosh scored 
more than their opponents did in the 
whole game by procuring six runs. 

The game on the whole was slop- 
pily played with bonehead plays ga- 
lore. Luckily for the Freshmen, the 
Sophomores made the majority of 
these. 

Kraybill, captain of the Frosh, led 
the batters with three hits out of 
five, while Gibble led the Sophs with 
two out of two. 



URSINUS HANDS L. Y. 
SECOND DEFEAT; 9-3 



T CABINETS CHOOSE 

HAND-BOOK EDITORS 



THIRD INNING RALLY 
OF LOCALS PROVES 
FUTILE 



-u- 



RECORD CLASS WILL 
GRADUATE THIS YEAR 

PROGRAM IS ANNOUNCED 
FOR COMMENCEMENT 
EXERCISES 



The Ursinus baseball team again 
demonstrated its superiority over 
Lebanon Valley's last Saturday by 
outclassing them 9-3 at College ville. 
It was Ursinus' second victory of the 
season over the Mylinmen. 

Patrizio hurled the full game for 
Lebanon Valley. He had the mis- 
fortune to have the enemy's hits 
bunched together in only a few in- 
nings. They were coupled with a few 
errors to pile up a total of nine runs 
scored against him. 

Lebanon Valley scored all their 
runs in the third inning. Heller start- 
ed it off with a single. Shortlidge 
was safe on an error and Albright 
connected for a double to score both 
runners. He came home a minute 
later on "Sweeny" Light's single. 

Albright was the leading hitter for 
Lebanon Valley collecting a single 
and a double in four times to bat. 
Sterner was the big performer for 
Ursinus. He poled two hits and 
hardled thirteen chances at second 
base with only one slip up. 

Stine hurled good ball for the home 
team. His fast ball went by eight 
opposing batters for strike outs. 

O 



MEN'S GLEE CLUB 

ELECTS OFFICERS 



At a meeting of the combined Cab- 
inets of the Christian Associations, 
held last week, Mr. Robert Rouda- 
bush'31, and Miss Elizabeth Ulrich, 
'31, were chosen editors of the "Y" 
Hand-Book for next year. 

It is the duty of these editors to 
attend to the publication of he man- 
ual which is disributed to all the stu- 
dents, and which contains rules, yells, 
school-songs, and other information 
leading to a better understanding of 
the affairs and activities of the cam- 
pus. 

For several years, the nature of 
the Hand-Book has remained the 
same, with the exception of such al- 
terations as were absolutely neces- 
sary. If funds are available, the edi- 
tors contemplate a complete revision 
for next year. The books will be ready 
for distribution at the time of regis- 
tration in September. 

O 

LIFE WORK RECRUITS 

ELECT NEW OFFICERS 

At a short meeting of the Life 
Work Recruits on Thursday even- 
ing, the officers for the coming school 
year were elected. For chief exec- 
utives it was decided to have co- 
chairmen, representing the Student 
Volunteers and Ministerium respec- 
tively. The co-chairmen elected are 
Ray Harris and Ruth Liller. The 
treasurer is Paul Emerheiser, and 
the secretary is Ruth Agen. After 
a circle of prayer the meeting closed. 



The office of the Registrar reports 
that the largest number of students 
in the history of Lebanon Valley Col- 
lege has filed application for degrees. 
A total of ninety applications have 
been submitted. Final arrangements 
for the conferring of these degrees 
have been completed and announced 
by the President. 

Applications for degrees were dis- 
tributed as follows: 

Bachelor of Arts 51 

Bachelor of Science 20 

B. S. in Ecconomics 4 

B. S. in Education 8 

Summer Session Applicants: 

Bachelor of Arts 1 

B. S. in Education 3 

Master of Science 3 

Total 90 

The completed program for com- 
mencement is arranged: as follows: 
Sunday, June 8th— 10:30 A. M., 
Baccalaureate sermon, United Breth- 
ren Church, by Raymond P. Dough- 
erty, D.D., Ph.D., Professor of As- 
syriology and Babylonian Literature; 
Yale University. 

Monday, June 9th— 11:00 A. M., 
annual meeting of the Board of 
Trustees; 8:00 P. M., exercises by 
(Continued on Page Four) 



The Men's Glee Club of Lebanon 
Valley College held their last meet- 
ing of the year last Thursday at 
noon. 

The following officers for netx 
year were eected: 

President, Robert Roudabush; 
Vice President, Kenneth Russell; 
Business Manager, Paul Keene; See 
retary, Paul Evancoe; Treasurer 
Harry Tobias. 

The Business Manager made his re- 
port for the year. Due to an un- 
usual scarcity of engagements, the 
club had no remuneration to offer 
the members for the season's work 



COLLEGE CALENDAR 



Friday, May 30— Memorial Day. 

Baseball with Albrights-home. 
Sunday, June 1 — Y. M. and Y. W 

Meetings. 
Monday, June 2-7 — Semester I 

exams begin. 
Saturday, June 7 — Baseball with 

Susquehanna. 
Sunday, June 8 — Baccalaureate 

Sermon 10:30. 
Tuesday, June 10 — Alumni Day. 
Alumni banquet. 
Class Day, 2:30. 
j Wednesday, June 11 — Commence 
ment. 



FROSH ANTHOLOGIES 
ARE OH DISPLAY 



EXCELLENT COLLECTION 
EXHIBITS UNUSUAL 
WORKMANSHIP 



According to reports received from 
Miss Mary K. Wallace, assistant pro 
fessor of English, and instructor of 
the class in English composition, the 
anthologies produced by the First 
Year Students, are an unusually in 
teresting collection this year. Those 
who have examined the collection 
which is at the present time on dis- 
play in the office of Miss Wallace in 
the Carnegie Library building, are 
enthusiastic in their support of her 
opinion. 

The production of these antholo 
gies is a yearly requirement made by 
Miss Wallace since her arrival at 
Lebanon Valley. The work is left 
entirely to the students, preliminary 
instructions alone being furnished by 
the instructor. The choice of a sub 
ject, the selection of poems, dedica- 
tion, foreword, printing, and binding 
all are taken care of by each indi- 
vidual. A great deal of originality 
is accordingly to be expected. 

A wide range of subjects and ex- 
ceptional types of binding are fea- 
tures of this year's products. Among 
the former, nature themes predomi- 
nate, but subjects range all the way 

(Continued on Page Four) 



NEW SENATE ELECTS 
RUSSELL PRESIDENT 



RULES TO BE REVISED 
FOR NEXT 
TERM 



At a special meeting of the newly- 
elected Men's Senate on Tuesday af- 
ternoon, Kenneth L. Russell was 
elected president of the organization. 
Mr. Russell has been a member of 
the Men's Senate for the past two 
years and has been quite active in 
the work of the body. Under his 
capable leadership the Senate sohuld 
move forward and accomplish much 
in the way of progress during the 
coming term. At the same time, 
Russell Morgan was elected Vice- 
President and George Nye was elect- 
ed Secretary-Treasurer. Both these 
men are former members of the 
body. 

Preceding the election, the Senate 
reviewed the rules and regulations by 
which the student body are governed, 
revising these wherever necessary. 
Special attention was paid to those 
rules regarding the conduct of the 
Freshmen, as the Senate deemed it 
feasible to discontinue several of the 
less important ones. The aim of the 
revision was to place the dignity of 
the body on a higher plane. 

After the results of the election 
had been announced, Proessor Ging- 
rich, chairman of the Senate-Faculty 
Committee, gave the newly-elected 
Senate a short talk concerning the 
duties expected of them as members 
of the student governing body. He 
made several suggestions concerning 
improvements in organization which 
he thought could be made with ad- 
vantage. Having no further busi- 
ness, the meeting adjouorned. 

A full account of the proceedings 
is contained in the following extract 
from the minutes of the Senate: 
May 27, 1930. 
The Men's Senate for the year 
1930-31 held a meeting in Room 5 of 
the Administration Building at 1:00 
P. M. and discussed the present 
Rules and Regulations of the Men's 
Senate, particularly those relating to 

(Continued on Page Four) 

O 

GERMAN CLUB PLANS 

WORK FOR NEXT YEAR 



Der Deutsche Verein or the Ger- 
man Club, held a business meeting 
last Tuesday, May 30. The meeting 
was opened by the President, Miss 
Ethel May Hower. The main item 
of importance that was discussed 
was the problem of keeping the same 
.officers for next year. Due to the 
fact that the club has not had time 
to function as yet, it was decided to 
keep the same officers. 

The program for next year is one 
that promises to be extremely inter- 
esting for the members. The club 
intends to purchase various German 
song and poetry books through the 
use of which the meetings will be 
made more attractive. Conversation 
will also be carried on in German. 



PAGE TWO 



LA VIE COLLEGIENKE, THURSDAY, MAY 29, 1930. 



ESTABLISHED 1925 



A w««kly publication by the TJnder- 
rraduate Students of Lebanon 
Valley College 



EDITOEIAL STAFF 

Russel Etter, '31 Editor-in-Uief 

Ruth Liller, '31 Associate Edito 

R. Roudabush, '31 .... Associate Edito: 
R .Morgan, '31 .... Managing Edito 



1EPOBTOBIAL STAFF 

Robert Eshleman, '31 

Madeline Sheddy, '31 

Ruth Shroyer, '32 

Hilda Buckley, '32 

Walter Krumbeigel, '33 

General Reporte 

Mary Goshert, '32 Conservatory 

Robert Rawhouser, '32 Athletic 

Dorothy Garber, '32 CHonia.i 

Mary Epply, '32 Delphian 

Percy Clements, '33 Kalozetea: 

Fred Mund, '32 Philokosmian 

Edna Early, '31 .... Alumni Reporte 



BUSINESS STAFF 

G. Becker, '31 .... Business Manager 

P. Keene, '32 Asst. Business Manage 

C. Wise, '31 .... Circulation Managei 



FACULTY ADVISORS 

Dr. Paul A. W. Wallace, English Dept. 
Miss Mary K. Wallace, English Dept 
Dr. Paul S. Wagner. Math. Dept. 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE. a member 
of the Intercollegiate Newspaper Asso- 
ciation of the Middle Atlantic States 



Single Copies IP cents 

Subscription $1.50 per year 

Entered at the Annville, Pa., post- 
office as second class matter under the 
Act of March 3. 1879. 



GOD SPEED 



It seems but yesterday that we 
made your acquaintance. This busj 
world moves so rapidly that time ha 
come to mean very little. Somehow 
or other the years have passed, an 
again we come to the parting of the 
ways. 

They have been h: ppy years Ac 
quaintance has ripaned into friend 
ship; attachments have been formed 
which only the unfolding of the years 
that be ahead can bring to full ma- 
turity. There have been diappoint 
ments, too, but somehow they seem 
to fede away and dissolve in the con- 
templation of the many happy times 
we have spent together. 

We envy your position. You whose 
faces are turned eagerly toward the 
affairs of this great, bustling, mod 
ern world — .how gladly would we 
share your outlook! And yet, half 
regret fully, we turn to contemplate 
the time that is so rapidly slipping 
through our own fingers, and which 
marks the conclusion of this gallent 
dashing' glorious adventure — Col- 
lege life. 

We trust that in the rush of affairs 
in which your future life will inevi- 
itably be engulfed, you will find time 
occasionally to turn your face toward 
dear old L. V. C; to turn back to 
those happy, carefree days when the 
spirit of youth reigned triumphant 
within you. And in those reveries, 
we hope that memory may conjure 
up the warm pressure of a hearty 
handshake, the soft glow of a benign 
and friendly smile, and the parting 
benediction of a faculty and student- 
body who wish you — God speed! 

O 

VALEDICTORY 



Fafewell. How much is implied, 
how much contained in that one word! 
Is seems scarcely possible that four 
years have already passed since we 
first came to our Alma Mater: that 
it is already time to make our adieus 
and make room for the next classes. 
When we look back, how green we 
seemed then — and how sophisticated 
now. What a wealth of experiences 
we have had. We see many moments 
of happiness, many successes, many 
beautiful friendships formed, some 



failures and we realize that now we 
are leaving much, the memories of 
which shall brighten all our future 
lives. How often we shall see in ret- 
rospect our rather carefree lives here. 
We are thankful we have made as 
much of our opportunities as we 
have and perhaps wish we had used 
some of them better. 

Through these reflections, sad- 
dened by the thoughts that some 
laces we will nevei^ perhaps, see 
again, and that these familiar scenes 
will be far away, we feel an opti- 
mistic* note for the future. After all 
chis was but preparation. We are, in 
reality, commencing — not graduating. 
We have completed four happy years 
tut now we are anxious to get out 
and do things; to be able to help 
others; to feel that we are truly parts 
of this great experience called Life. 
This was a pleasant four years but 
it seems to have been often childish 
and now we are ready to take an 
adult's place in the world and to ac- 
cept an adult's responsibilitia(s. 

Now we say our valediction. We 
hope we have hepled to make our 
Alma Mater "bigger and better". If 
we can come a little closer to truth 
or obtain a clearer view of it to pass 
on to posterity we shall feel that we 
have been true to our Lebanon Val 
ley heritage, for "the truth will make 
you free". As we leave we say: 
Now at last our time is over 
And our last exams we've passed, 
And we say good-by, forever, 
To teachers, school and class. 
We will take our school day victories 
Into the world's grim fight; 
And the vision still shall cheer us 
Of the blue and the white. 

O 



FROSH THOUGHTS 



A TALE OF A CAVE 



TILL WE MEET AGAIN 



Well, it's over at last, that is, one 
more year of ti. Wonder how we 
pulled through anyway, don't you? 
fhe books? Oh, no; that's not what 
we mean at all. They're all snap 
ourses in comparison to publishing 
the La Vie; there's a job for you, if 
you feel bored to death by a lack of 
work! 

Stimulating? We should say so! Es 
pecially during these all-too-numer- 
ous weeks when there's nothing do- 
ing, and when even a dog's biting a 
man is news. That's when the editors 
have a chance to give a piece of their 
minds— if they have any to spare. 
And digging up the "dirt"— even a 
sewing-circle or a "bull-session" must 
take a back seat. 

The only thing that makes us un 
comfortable is the fact that we've 
still a little green at the game. We 
aimed to force the Saturday Even- 
ing Post, Judge, Life, College Humor, 
etc., etc., out of circulation, but as 
yet our aims have not been reached. 
Of course we have a second chance 
next year and quite seriously, we're 
counting on it like the mischief! We 
have a lot of half-hatched ideas 
floating around in our cranium, and 
we hope that the heat of the sum- 
mer will be sufficient to furnish prop- 
er incubation. 

But will you help to feed the 
"chicks" when they break through 
the shell? You know its easy to in- 
form the staff that they're the worst 
bunch of bone-heads this side of No 
Man's Land, and to tell them that 
the paper's rotten, the news is stale, 
the jokes are ancient, the proof-read- 
ing is abominable, and all the rest of 
it. But the "chicks" are such obsti- 
nate creatures, they simple refuse to 
thrive on that sort of diet. 

So let's start digging right now 
and help it up the rest of the sum- 
mer. And if we don't locate a juicy 
worm of an idea, or two or three be- 
fore we return for next fall's session, 
then we'll have to admit that it's a 
cruel world, an admission we're not 
going to make until we've done con- 
siderably more digging. 



There was once a hidden cave 
along the dark Swatara near which 
many a lad fished, swam, or walked 
with his sweetheart in the moon- 
light. But it is no longer the place 
of secret trys: or young adventure 
for now uniformed guides direct 
gaping crowds through the brilliant 
ly lighted, gravel pathod caverns, 
and the quiet b-vuty is gone forever. 

The gu'de tells one tale of a hermit 
and his lonely life, and another one 
of the T ndians and their tribal fires 
Howevar there is a story which most 
tourists have not heard but which 
is most intrigu'ng. 

A group of townboys about fifteen 
years of age had been in the habit 
of visiting the two largest rooms. 
But most of them were forbidden to 
go to the lower chamber because 
dynamite was continually being set 
off in a stone quarry nearby and 
therefore the parents feared that the 
roocks might be loosened and cave 




CHARLES MONROE FINK 



Nevertheless one spring evening 
he boys decided to explore the lower 
chamber. Perhaps curiosity caused 
these six boys to disobey their par- 
nts or then it may have been the 
plain statement tha such an explora- 
; on must not be taken that prompted 
his act. At any rate the six fellows 
et out. They walked cut the rail- 
oad track to the path over the bluff, 
nd there entered the cave. 
All the way to the cave the con- 
versation was gleeful with adven- 
ure, but once they were inside the 
lammy dampness of the first cham- 
ber their laughter stilled, and they 
heugbt with a little misgiving at 
their parents orders. Not that the 
•^a^k bulks of sta^gmites, wavering 
uncertainly in the torch lights fright- 
ened them, but rather the thought of 
L he danger of the unexplored cham- 
bers into which they meant to go. 

"Here's the opening," cried Russ 
as he leaned over the dark abyss tc 
gain a view cf the place. "Sh — 
here's something down there." 

Bob leaned over. "You bet there 
is. Wonder who it is and why he 
doesn't talk? Gosh! It's getting 
fainter." 

"Oh! You Ninny. Come on, give 
me that rope ladder." said Ted. 

"Well hurry a little yourself. It's 
nine-thirty now and half the town 
will be out here to find us," was the 
reply. 

Say, I can't kick the side of the 
wall in, can I?" he asked. "Here 
Smittie, you try." 

But the lower chambers were not 
explored that night, for as Smittie 
tried to kick footholds into the 
muddy wall of the slope, his foot 
struck against something hard and 
unyielding. He kicked the mud away 
on both sides and turned his pocket 
flash upon the obstacle. He gasped 
and swallowed hard. This outburst 
was followed by anxious questions 
from his chums. With some assis- 
tance he pulled out a six inch cub 
colored or rather stained a dark grey 
by the damp-clay drippings of the 
cave, yet strangely skull and cross- 
bones stood forth in a warning way. 
A sudden terror seized all of them 
and Smittie grasping the box ran 
headlong out of the cave. The re 
mainder of the boys followed him 
falling, stumbling, slipping on the 
uneven floor of the cave. They did 
not stop at the entrance for the moor 
was making wierd shadows in the 
woods, and this crowd had seen 
nough shadows for one evening 
When they reached the edge of town 
Smittie suggested that they go tc 
his home to investigate the contents 



Charles Monroe Fink is another 
one of the boys who will don the cap 
and gown next month, receive a de- 
gree, and then face the viscissitudes 
of this cruel cosmos. For four years 
he has earnestly been striving for 
this end, and now that it is here, we 
wish him the best of luck. 

Charles has blond hair, blue eyes, 
an infectious smile and a wonderful 
tenor voice. And Charles certainly 
uses these gifts to the best advan- 
tage. 

Mr. Fink is one of the local boys — 
a day student * * * He is majoring 
in Mathematics * * * Belongs to the 
Kalozetean Literary Society * * * 
Played Varsity Tennis 1, 2, 3, 4 and 
class football 1; also class basketball 
1, 2, 3, 4. 



HILDA IRENE HESS 

Miss Hilda Hess is the young 
lady who received the highest social 
honor that the student body can be- 
stow — the Queen of May. And sel- 
dom was a a more majestic Queen 
seen. Her poise and charm were those 
of a true medieval Emporess who 
watched the gallant knights battle 
honor in the tournaments. 

Hilda is majoring in Music, organ 
to be more specific, and those who 
have heard her at the recitals will 
surely expect her success when she 
leaves us. She also sings with the 
Eurpdice Choral Club, and was its 
business manager last year. 

However she is not restricted to 
the esthetic but also propounds logic 
in debates. Here also was she chosen 
for business manager. Besides these 
honor, she was class Vice President 
1, and also Class Secretary. She is 
a member of Olio, was its Vice Pres- 
ident this year, and served on its 
Anniversary Programs 1, 3, 4. 



and to try to discover who might 
have placed so small a box with so 
iamiliar a warning in this silent and 
unknown cave. 

When all the boys had gathered 
around Smittie's dining room table, 
they opened the box. Smittie started 
to read a letter written on old 
parchment. 

"This is the letter of nineteen 
hundred nineteen. The contents of 
this box are opals, pegs, nails, and 
coins. The small box contains a 
^aluabel message but it is guarded 
by a high explosive. Beware!" 

What to do with the f;mall box wa-' 
the next question. Jimmy decided to 
take it out side and hit it with a 
brick. When he did so no explosion, 
resulted. But he walked cautionsly 
over to the spot where he had laid 
it and discovered another piece of 
parchment which declared that dia- 
monds could be made by placing car- 
bon and water in a lead container. 
After doing this one must place it 
upon a mountain thousand feet in 
heighth so that lightening might 
strike it at some time or another. 

The box and its contents were 
taken to "Penn State" several years 
ago. Some of the professor declared 
that the coins, which came from 
Spain, Greece and the Orient dated 
back as far as the birth of Christ, 
-md the "recipe" for diamonds might 
have proved successful if one could 
gain the heighth of such a mountain 
and at the same time obtain desired 
climatic conditions. But the opals 
proved to be moon stones of very lit- 
tle value. 

Now the box is kept by one of the 
crowd and when the men come home 
fter Christmas, they often speak of 
the affair as their most thrilling ad- 
venture. They have decided that the 
>reathing must have been the soft 
lapping of an owl's wings. But the 
mystery as to who placed the box 
there, remains. 



Now, that sort of mystic atmos- 
phere, that quivering of thrilling 
emotion is gone forever. Because, 
no longer as one steps into the cool 
entrance does the damp passage cast 
a cold blanket of mist over the shoul- 
ders, nor do the torches flicker in a 
way huge monsters are shadowed on 
the walls. 

The formation of innumerable 
images are washed; the color is 
brought forth and the world can see 
the beauty that God's hand alone 
could: carve on the "Rocks of the 
Ages." But with this crowd, these 
electric light, these steps that make 
the passages easy, something of its 
early glamor is gone for those boys. 
It can never return, never incite the 
human emotion for those who used 
to roam through the cranies. It can 
never again stir that feeling which 
frightens yet which gratifies the hu- 
man soul. 

By Jane Muth. 




Dr. Lena Lietzean who has just re- 
turned from Europe where she re- 
ceived her Ph.D. degree from the 
University of Vienna was the g^ est 
of the college last week. Dr. Lietz- 
ean will be Head of the German De- 
partment this coming year. 



Madame Greene visited in Fhila de1 ' 
phia on Saturday. Dr. Stella J° hn ' 
: on was the guest of her sister 
Baltimore over the week-end. 



at 



Miss Helen Myers, the college > 
brarian, is recovering from a P erl 
of illness at St. Joseph's Hospital a 
Lancaster. Miss Myers expects 

ek <» 



resume her work the lat we 
school. 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, MAY 29, 1930. 



PAGE THREE 




DELTA LAMBDA SIGMA 



"A COLLEGE JOKE T O CURE THE 'BLUES' " 

— Jonathan Swift. 



Exactly at 10:01 A. M. Monday, Charlie Bartolet of Lebanon Valley Co^ 
lege, set a new inter-collegiate "yo-yo" record, having "yo-yo-ed" Z2 con- 
secutive times with no stops whatever. His associates immediately pro- 
claimed him president of the "yo-yo" club, to be named "Bartolet and his 
Collegiate Yo-Yo Boys". Congratulations Charlie, we hope your records 
stands the test.' 

P. S. Since the above was written, Bartolet has broken his own record. 
The count now stands 437 with no stops. Salada, in all his efforts, cannot 
come near this score. 

— LVC— 

Nye — There are hairs in this soup. 

Heller — That's all right. This is noodle soup. 

— LVC— 

Henrietta — There is something about the woods in Springtime that gets 
under one's skin, isn't here? 
Barney — Yes, pine needles. 

— LVC— 

"Just another one of those thrill slayers," muttered Russel, as the 
chaperone hove into sight. 

— LVC— 

Officer of the Law (To McCusker at Mt Gretna). "What's the idea, 
kicking holes in the rink?" 

McCusker — I don't know how to skate and I want to get my money's 
worth. 

— LVC— 

The only time a horse gets frightened on the road nowadays is when 
he meets another horse. 

— LVC— 

Roudabush — Do you thing that airplanes will ever supplant automobiles ? 
Dot — No! who would want to park on a damp cloud? 

— LVC— 

Montieth — Hey, Jack, how about a tow into town? 
Passer-by — Aw, go hire a haul. 

— LVC — 

St. Peter — And here is your golden harp. 
Newly arrived American — How much is the first installment? 

— LVC — 

The invention of the harp was due to an accident, we read. On the 
other hand the inventor of tne bag pipe was a Highland Cottager who got 
*he idea through stepping on a cat. 

— LVC— 

Chaperon: Aren't there quite a few more boys than girls at this dance? 
Committee: Well, it's this way: The petting is two to one! 

— LVC— 
Do you know the gorilla song?" 
"Why no, I don't believe—" 
Gorilla my dreams I love you — " 
t> -LVC— 
Cell eve it or not^- 

j The Fhesrman, English Class has compiled a new lexicon with the 
following results. 
Xcursive — to travel in a helpful way — Dennis. 

of Shallot— A character from "The Merchant of Venice— Dennis 
athering Heights — A spot in Dickens Novels — Brinser 
01 ytheism — religion granting a number of wives to a man, the practice 
oi s W jf £ having more than one husband — Shellenberger. 
e Lady of Shallot — A vain lady who was always looking at herself in 
the mirror — Speg. 
fathering Heights— A health resort— Nye. 

sconade — A mountain range in France — Nye. 
ostacy — a state of confusion— Rettew. 
unk is learning the sign language, 
aub didn't go home last week end. 
e boys are finding new walking grounds. At least Ivy Poison nas 
disappeared. 

nnert "went over big" at his first social function last Friday night. 
eck is a women hater. 



An interesting, well prepared pro- 
gram was rendered at Delphian, on 
Friday evening. To make up for last 
time, perhaps, was the undue amount 
of liveliness, vivacity and enthusiam 
which pervaded the whole of the even- 
ing's entertainment. 

The meeting opened with devotions 
in charge of the Chaplain. 

Immediately following this, a skit, 
starring Helen Franklin, Arlene Heck- 
rote, and Harriet Miller, was present- 
ed, under the direction of "Flo" 
Grimm. Much excitement prevailed 
in the audience as the actors received 
a sealed letter containing the word 
"Beware — " Interpreting this as a 
warning against some future attack 
of murder, they began collecting 
knives, guns, and other weapons as 
means of protection. Having made 
these preparations, they turned again 
to the sealed letter and found, upon 
closer investigation, that it contain- 
ed the sentence "Beware of imita- 
tions!", thus proving again the truth 
of the old exhortation: Do not jump 
at conclusions." 

The last number on the program 
consisted of two brief talks on the 
subject, "Expectations and Realize 
tions of College Life," given by Eva 
Peck and Ruth Agen. , Both girls 
told how their ideals of college have 
been changed, since coming to L. V. 
C. The humorous was intermingled 
with the serious, as the girls por- 
trayed realistic pictures of college 
life as they see it while on the firing 
line. 

-0 

Fall-term officers were elected at 
a brief business session of Delphian, 
Tuesday noon. Those signally hon- 
ored to head their society in the 
opening term of 1930-31, are as fol- 
lows: 

President, Dorothy Hafer; Vice 
President, Caroline Fisher; Record- 
ing Secretary, Edith Fields; Corre- 
sponding Secretary, Anna Wolfe; 
Treasurer, Hilda Buckley; Pianist, 
Helen Peterson; Chaplain, Henrietta 
Wagner; Critic, Marie Gelwicks; 
Wardens, Gloria La Vanture and 
Augusta Trachte. 

O 

PHI LAMBDA SIGMA 



The last combined literary and bus- 
iness session of Philo for the present 
school term was held on Friday, May 
23. The President, Edgar Hertzler, 
called the meeting to order. Harry 
Zeck then conducted devotions, using 
for his scripture lesson the "Refuge" 
Psalm. "A Night at Sea" was the 
topic of a paper read by Paul Evan- 
coe. In it he very ably discussed the 
attitudes of men toward life and their 
philosophies, using for the scene of 
action a radio room of a ship. The 
next number was a talk on the sub- 
ject "Carnegie Exams." In this talk 
resume of the recent sophomore tests. 
The talk was spicey and interesting. 
Robert Rawhouser gave a rambling 
He ended his talk with a vivid nar- 
ration of the results of a bet made 
in conection with the culture test. 
Folowing this two ex-active mem- 
bers of Philo, Wilt, '26, and Nitram 
'28 gave encouraging and complement- 
ary remarks. After the critic's report 
by William J. Myers, one of the best 
attended and finest literary sessions 
of the year came to a close. 

At a short business meeting the 
following officers were elected for 
the coming fall term: President, Earl 
Wolf; Vice President, Paul Keene; 
Recording Secretary, Marvin Schell; 
Corresponding Secretary, Fred Mund; 
Treasurer, Francis Bar; Pianist, 
Charles Kraybill; Chairman of Ex- 
ecutive Committee, S. Fred Christ- 
man; Critic, Warren Lebo; Editor, 
John David Hughes; Chaplain, Ches- 
ter O. Goodman; and Seargants at 
arms, Amos Knisely, Harry Zeck, and 
Carl Myers. 



KAPPA LAMBDA NU 



At a business meeting of Clionian 
Literary Society on Friday, May 23, 
the chairman of the Judiciary Com- 
mittee submitted the names of the 
nominees for the officers who will be 
chosen by the society to begin next 
year's first term. It was decided that 
the election should be held Tuesday, 
May,. 

Devotions, led by the Chaplain, fol- 
lowed the business meeting. The last 
literary session of the year 1929-30 
was devoted to the Senior members 
of the society. An excellent program 
was rendered — one which caused the 
undergraduates to feel something 
akin to sorrow on realizing that 
many of their best friends, noble, 
reliable society sisters, will soon have 
received their sheep-skins and have 
departed from the halls of L. V. C. 

The first number of the program 
was a piano solo, "Polichinele" by 
Rachmaninoff, played by Hilda Hess, 
whose marvelous skill at the piano 
has been witnessed often and heart- 
ily appreciated by the society girls. 
Clio's song bird, Leah Miller, very 
beautifully and effectively sang "In- 
dian Love Call", a number which is 
certain to please any audience — 
which more so when the atmosphere 
is permeated by Leah's charming 
personality. 

Alcesta Slichter then displayed a 
side of her versatile nature not gen- 
erally known to the campus — her 
oratorical ability. Her first number 
"Wind" by Eugene Field, was splen- 
didly rendered; her second recitation, 
a humorous selection, amused the 
girls a great deal. 

More musical ability was delight- 
fully shown in two vocal solos, "Pre- 
lude" by Ronald, and "Sweetest 
Flowe^- that Blows", sung by Irene 
Peter. 

The concluding number on the pro- 
gram was a solo dance by Mildred 
Saylor, whose light and graceful 
steps formed a pleasing climax to 
the evening's entertainment. 

— O 



BEYOND THE CAMPUS 



Within the last ten years the gov- 
ernment has lost approximately 
$250,000 through cadets flunking out 
of the U. S. Military Academy at 
West Point. 

At Louisiana State University they 
are experimenting with the ultra- 
violet ray on brood sows to prevent 
rickets in spring pigs. They are also 
giving the porkers cod liver oil. The 
sows take the violet ray treatments 
fifteen minutes a day three times a 
week, getting a nice coat of tan. 
O 

The census reports from Florida 
show that the tribe of Seminole In- 
dians has increased. They now num- 
ber 468, an increase of of 3 per cent 
since the last report, taken in 1920. 
O 

The Graf Zeppelin left Friedriek- 
shafen, Germany, on May 19th, for 
an 18,000 mile trip, across tthe 
Equator to South and North America. 
From Seville the Graf will head 
southward across the Equator to 
Pernambuco, Brazil, a distance of 
approximately 5000 miles, almost 
entirely over water. 

O 

Lexicographical contributions of a 
Sixth avenue merchant in his sign: 
"Pajamas, majamas, and kidjamas." 

Some strange additions are being 
made by various manufacturing con- 
cerns. Fleischmann's yeast has 
taken on Chase & Sanborn's Coffee as 
a brother product. General Motors 
<? going in for refrigerators and radio 
sets, and Singer Sewing Machine Co. 
after 67 years in a one-line business,, 



is bringing out a vacuum cleaner. The 
Aeolian Company, manufacturers of 
pianos, and Pratt, Read & Company, 
makers of piano actions, are to add 
motorboats to their lines. 

O 

The Gillette Safety Razor Company 
is spending ten million dollars to ad- 
vertise their new razor; of this 
f.mount $2,500,000 will be spent out- 
side the United States. Advertise- 
ments are to appear in practically 
every foreign country. The one ex- 
ception is Russia, famed for its whis- 
kers. 

O 




The Eurydice Choral Club gave 
their annual concert for the year 
1919, on Wednesday evening, April 
30. The concert was as usual very 
well enjoyed. The program was as 
follows: 

1 (a) Great is Thy Love— C. 
Bohm; (b) Rockin Seine — G. Knox; 
Club. 

2 (a) Morning Mood, "Peer 
Cypt" — Grieg; (b) Gypsy Songs — A. 
Dvorak; Club. 

3 Reading. 

4 (a) Booyour, Luzon — Leo De- 
libes; (b) Les Papillous — Ernest 
Chausson; (c) \Morndng — E. Edwin 
Sheldon; (d) Vanity Fair— G. H. 
Clutsan; a soloist. 

5 (a) All Thru' the Night— Her- 
bert; (b) Dreaming Rose — Harris; 
Club. 

Cantata — "Fays of the Floating 
Island" — Bliss; club. 

O 

MISSES WALTER AND 

OYER GIVE RECITAL 

A joint recital of unusual interest 
was given by Miriam Oyer, soprano 
and Violet Walter, organist, in Engle 
Hall last Thursday evening. A large 
and interested audience applauded 
the artists vigorously and enthusias- 
tically. 

Miss Oyer's singing is impressive. 
She disclosed a rich quality of tone 
and not only a sensitive understand- 
ing of the moods of her songs but 
also the ability to present them to 
her hearers. She has a fine sense of 
dramatic values as well as a deft 
lyric touch which carried her audi- 
ence through a wide range of emo- 
tions. She opened her program with 
the old Italian and old English songs 
displaying contrasting lyric qualities 
of her voice. She gave a most artis- 
tic reading of Van Weber's aria, 
Piano Piano with delicate shading, 
rich tone color and ease of technical 
skill. The group of American songs 
with their varying dramatic and lyric 
moods brought the program to a 
most effective climax. Her delight- 
ful personality added much to the 
charm of her singing. 

Miss Walter exhibited fine quali- 
ties of musicianship. She played witft 
convincing authority, technical fa- 
cility, taste and fine style. The 
group of three present day compos- 
ers gave her opportunity to display 
effective registration and technical 
skill of contrasting moods. The Yon 
Rhapsody was played with individ- 
uality and a keen feeling for the 
style of the composition. She was 
an efficient and understanding ac- 
companist. 



M § g B QMITH 

JEWELER 

Watches at Lowest Prices 
Watch and Clock Repairing 

38 Railroad St. Annville, Pa. 



PAGE FOUR 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, MAY 29, 1930. 



NEW SENATE ELECTS 

RUSSELL PRESIDENT 



(Continued from Page I) 



the Freshmen. 

The following rules have been re- 
vised; and read as follows: 

No. 4 — Freshmen shall at all times 
keep off the grass. Only paths shall 
be used. 

No. 7 — Freshmen are required to 
perform reasonable errands request- 
ed by upper classmen. 

No. 25 — Posters or paint shall not 
be placed upon the walls of any 
property. 

No. 29 — All Freshmen shall enter 
and leave the Conservatory building 
by the rear door. 

The following rules have been re- 
moved: 

No. 15 — Under classmen shall open 
doors for upper classmen. 

No. 22 — "Freshmen Week" will be 
held at a time specified and under 
the supervision of the Men's Senate 

No. 24 — Freshmen shall at all 
times keep their hands out of their 
pockets. 

N . 30 — Playing of golf on the 
campus will be prohibited: 

With Professor Gingrich and Dr. 
Richie acting as judge and teller of 
the election, the following officers 
were elected: 

President, Kenneth Russell; Vice- 
President, Russel Morgan; Secretary- 
Treasurer, George R. Nye. 

The Dormitory Rules and Major 
Offences remain untouched. 



RECORD CLASS WILL 

GRADUATE THIS YEAR 



(Continued from Page One) 



Students of Conservatory of Music. 

Tuesday, June 10th, Alumni Day — 
10:30 A. M., Alumni Association Bus- 
iness Meeting; 12:00 M., Alumni 
Luncheon, College Dining Hall; 1:30 
P. M., Class Day Exercises; 3:30 P. 
M., Class Reunions; 6:30 P. M., An- 
nual Alumni Banquet, Annville High 
School Gymnasium. 

Wednesday, June 11th— 10:00 A 
M., Commencement Exercises; ad 
dress by Dr. John A. H. Keith, Supt 
Public Instruction, Pennsylvania. 

Of especial interest is the appear- 
ance of Dr. R. P. Dougherty as Bac 
calaureate speaker. Dr. Dougherty 
is a graduate of L. V. who has earn 
ed considerable distinction as a re- 
search-worker in the field of As 
syriology and Babylonian Literature 
of which he is professor at Yale. H 
formerly served in the African mis- 
sion field and on the faculty c 
Goucher University. He is a m :\n o 
an exceptionally broad experience 
and a pleasing personality; his ad 
dress will undoubtedly be of unusual 
interest and value. 

O 

MORAVIAN YIELDS 

TO TENNNS MEN 



(Continued from Page i) 



Y. W. NOTES 



"Something different" featured the 
regular weekly meeting of the Y. W. 
C. A. Sunday evening. An outdoor 
vesper service was held on North 
Hall porch, during the usual 
"Friendly Hour". This proved to be 
quite interesting and helpful, and 
also served as a change from the or- 
dinary form of service. The program 
was built up on the appropriate 
theme, "Nature", with Luella Heil- 
man in charge. 

After the singing of several out- 
door hymns, the leader read the 
Scripture lesson and offered prayer. 
Eva Peck then gave a short talk on 
"Spiritual Realizations", in which 
she showedi the development of the 
student's life spiritually and told 
how he comes to realize his stand 
; n regard to religion. Following this, 
Marian Kruger sang a solo, "Silent 
Voice", which lent an added touch of 
beauty and meaning to the service. 
Elizabeth Keister brought the meet- 
ing te a class by reading two poems 
entitled "God's World" and "Trees 
^nd the Master." 



FROSH ANTHOLOGIES 

ARE ON DISPLAY 



PIANOS 

PLAYER PIANOS 

PLAYER ROLLS 
VICTOR RADIOS 

VICT ROLAS 

VICTOR RECORDS | 
SHEET MUSIC 

Miller Music Store | 

738 Cumberland Street 
Lebanon, Pa. 



FOR KEINT 

Furnished Apartment or Rooms for 
married or single students during the 
coming year. For particulars see 

MRS. GEO. HEILMAN, 
457 E. Main St., Annville, Pa. 



PHOTOGRAPHS 

LIVE FOREVER 

Ulrich's Studio 

820 Cumberland St. 



(Continued from Page One) 



from the treatment of the lightest 
themes, to the heaviest and most 
sombre The modern trend toward 
brilliant colors has crept into the 
bindings, many of which are excep- 
tionally berutiful. The selection of 
ooems. too, exhibits an excellent lit- 
erary t"ste on the part of the fresh- 
men. 

An rdded impetus was e ; ven to th"> 
work by the offering, this year, of 
a prize for the b-^st anthology. A 
^nmittee of three judges has been 
appointed to take care of the award- 
'ng of this prize. Those who have 

xamined the collection, however, ex- 
press the opinion that the judging 

ill be extrem-ly difficult, due to th2 
?cnercl ex-ellence of the exhibit. 

he prize will be awarded during the 
Commencement exercises. 



PRINTING 




PUBLICATION. 
BOOKS, CATA 
LOGUE3, STATION- 
ERY, CARDS, TAGS, 
ETC. 



A.NNY1LLE PRINTING 
COMPANY 

ANNVILLE PA 



S--K 

STUDIO 
24 H O U R 
FILM SERVICE 



took the next two. The score of 
their match was 4-6, 6-1, 6-2. 

Donmoyer and Fink sustained their 
first defeat of the season in doubles 
in a hard fought game with Hoff- 
man and Balmonn. The first two 
sets were divided, Moravian winning 
the first 6-3, and Lebanon Valley tak- 
ing the second one, 6-4. After a hard 
fight, Moravian won the deciding set 
10-8. 

The tennis team closes its schedule 
on Wednesday by playing Elizabeth- 
town College at Elizabethtown. The 
boys have made an enviable record 
this year, losing only one of their 
eight matches. It is to be regretted 
that a return match with Franklin 
and Marshall is not on the schedule 
as it would give the team a chance 
to wipe out its only defeat. 



E. J. SNAVELY AND COMPANY 

UMBRELLAS, LUGGAGE and SPORTING GOODS 
ATHLETIC EQUIPMENT 
628 Cumberland St. 
LEBANON. PENNA. 



PARKER FOUNTAIN PENS 

GUARANTEE D FOR LIFE 

Two Pens in One— A Desk Pen and a Pocket Pen. 
Ask To See Them. 

ESBENSHADE'S BOOK STORE 

38 N. 8th St. -:- -:- Lebanon, Pa. 



H W MILLER 

HARDWARE 
OF QUALITY 



Annville 



Pa. 



PRINTING 

When you want work 
of the better kind see 

HIESTER— The Printer 



J.FBERLEW 
DEPARTMENT STORE 

Ladies Sandals, White, Black andl 
White, Tan, Novelty Shoes, Full 
Fashioned Hosiery. 
Men's Van Heusen Shirts, Sport 
Shoes, Pure Silk Neckwear, Athletic 
Underwear, B. V. D.'s. 



WHAT ABOUT YOUR 
GRADUATING GIFTS? 



A large assortment at 



BOLLMANS 

.53 South Eighth Street, 

Lebanon, Pa. 



D. L SAYLOR & SONS 

Contractors 

LUMBER AND COAL 



AiNNVILLE. PA. 



TRY OUR HOME MADE 
SANDWICHES 

QUALITY LUNCH 

BREYER'S ICE CREAM 
A Specialty 

7 E. Main St. Annville, P a> 



For Quality 

Baked Products 

Patronize 

FINK'S BAKERY 

Main Street 



Sale of Book Ends to 
Sell at 

29c a pair 

These Book Ends Are 
Worth From $1.00 to $1.50 
a pair. 

GRIMMS 

COLLEGE BOOK STORE 



Fine assortment of Watches, Rings, 

Chains, & etc. 
New Century Chiming Grandfather 
Clocks 

LIGHT'S JEWELRY STORE 
51 West Main St. 



CHEFS 

HOUSE OF GOOD 

EAAn 



Wm. Penn Highway 
Near Annville 



Meals Served at All Hours 
Our Specialty 

BANQUETS AND PARTIES 



KREAMER BROS. 



CLOTHING 07 QUALITY 

J S BASEHORE 

Lebanon, Pa. 



STEINITE RADIOS 
EASY ELECTRIC WASHE R 
COLUMBIA GAS STOVES AND RANGES 
RUGS AND LINOLEUMS 

"House of Better Values" 
FURNITURE AND UNDERTAKING 

328 W. Main St. Pho ne 6R3 




—Shaeffer's Lifetime Pens — 

NONE BETTER ABSOLUTELY GUARANTEED 

AN EVERYDAY NECESSITY FOR 
COLLEGE STUDENTS 

The Gift Store of Lebanon 
757-759 Cumberland Street 



HARPEL'S 



. the 

We wish to thank the students for their patronage during 
year and wish them a very sucessful vacation. 

THE PENNWAY 

OPPOSITE P. O. 
A FULL LINE OF FRESH PASTRY DAILY 



ALUMNI! 
SUBSCRIBE FOR 
LA VIE 



ItHfieCblltyieiist 

LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



ALL ALUMNI 
WERE ONCE TIMID 
FRESHMEN 



VOLUME VI 



COLLEGE ENDOWMENT 
NEARS MILLION MARK 

CAPITAL INCREASE 
WILL BENEFIT 
STUDENTS 



ANNVILLE, P ENNSYLVANIA, THURSDAY, JUNE 12, 1930. 



No. 10 



With an endowment of about 
$910,000 forming the financial sta- 
bility of the college, the student 
body in September 1930 will begin 
their college work under the most 
advantageous conditions this college 
has ever experienced. 

Although the endowment cam 
paign only closed in April of th»s 
year, benefits have already accrued 
from the increase in funds. The De- 
partment of Physical Education for 
Women, organized in September 
1928 and including in its personnel a 
medical adviser and physical direc- 
tor, was a direct result of the cam- 
paign. By reason of the large en 
dowwient, the college was also 
admitted as an Associate Member of 
the American Association of Univer 
sity Women, the membership of 
which organization is restricted by 
high qualifications. 

The most direct result for the stu 
dent will be in the opening of the 
three new positions on the faculty. 

(Continued on Page 3) 

O 



TRADITIONAL IVY 

CEREMONY FOLLOWED 



THREE PH. D'S ARE 
ADDED TO FACULTY 



TEACHER OF PUBLIC 
SCHOOL MUSIC FOR 
CONSERVATORY 



As three additional Doctors of 
Philosophy assume their duties on 
the college faculty in September and 
a fourth professor is added to the 
conservatory staff, this school will 
°Pen its year's work with the most 
capable group of professors it has 
ev er had in the college's history. 
Furthermore compared with other 
c °heg es of its size, the number of 
th « Lebanon Valley faculty holding 
the highest degrees obtainable in 
heir respective fields is exceedingly 
high. 

Dr. Lena Lietzau. who recently 
took the Ph. D. degree at the Univer- 
sity of Vienna, Austria, will super- 
VlSe the work of the German Depart- 
ment and will be Dean of South Hall, 
the present time Dr. Lietzau is 
at Blue Island, Illinois. She 
of German parantage, although 
°* n in the United States. 
^ n addition to her studying abroad 
»_* lietzau has taken work in the 
erman language and literature at 



ed 



diversities of Chicago and Mich- 
o ] • For ten years she was station- 
a t Saloniki, Greece,; where she 
a , 111 charge of missionary work 

* a school for girls, 
tfij/ Raymonid Ohl will be the new 
jj.' eetop of the Latin Department. 
s Al ma Mater is Haverford Col- 
l Continued on Page 4) 



Following the tradition establish- 
ed on Lebanon Valley campus by 
preceding senior classes, the class of 
1930 met Tuesday morning at seven 
o'clock at the northwest corner of the 
"Aid" Building to plant their sprig 
of ivy beside the sturdier and older 
vines of the older alumni. Amid tor- 
rents of rain the seniors assembled 
to witness the traditional ceremony. 

Homer Allwein, president of the 
class, planted the ivy. The custom- 
ary ivy oration was given by Miss 
Gladys 'Knaub, valedictorian of the 
class. Miss Knaub thruout her ora- 
tion, used the small vine then being 
planted as symbolic of the lives of 
the alumni. As the vine grows and 
takes its firm grip on the walls, so 
the alumni will become stronger and 
worthier by reason of their contacts 
with the world. 

O 



YALE DOCTOR SPEAKS 
AT BACCALAUREATE 

ALUMNUS OF CLASS OF 
'97 RETURNS TO 
GIVE SERMON 



Rev. Raymond P. Dougherty, Ph. 
D., delivered the Baccalaureate ser- 
mon to the sixty-fourth graduating 
class of Lebanon Valley College on 
Sunday morning, June 8, at 10:30 in 
the United Brethren church. Rev. 
Dougherty was graduated from Leb- 
anon Valley College in 1897, and later 
from Union Biblical Seminary, Day 
ton, Ohio. He took his Ph.D. degree 



EIGHTY SEVEN STUDENTS TAKE BACHELOR'S 
DEGREE AT SIXTTFOURTH COMMENCEMENT 

FIVE HONORARY AND FOUR MASTERS' DEGREES 
CONFERRED; DR. JOHN A. H. KEITH IS 
COMMENCEMENT ORATOR 



SENIOR CLASS HOLD 

MOONLIGHT PICNIC 



The Senior class held a delightful 
outing on the lawn of the Lebanon 
pumping station on Saturday even- 
ing, June 7. The crowd left the cam- 
pus in a luxurious bus about seven 
o'clock, and arrived at their destina- 
tion in high spirits. 

Japanese lanterns had been 
strung between the trees beside the 
lake, and a friendly moon smiled 
down upon the revelers, making a 
gorgeous setting. Several victrolas 
furnished entertainment, while mos- 
quitoes did their best to give every- 
one plenty of occupation. A campflre 
was built at the edge of the woods, 
and the party indulged in a generous 
feed. Singing was the last feature 
of the affair. As usual, "a good time 
was had by all." 

O 

MUSICIANS APPEAR IN 

BRILLIANT CONCERT 




Dr. Raymond P. Dougherty 

at Yale, has been an active minister, 
missionary, and college professor, 
and is at present a professor at Yale 
University, having the chair in 
Assyriology and Babylonian litera- 
ture. He brought to the class of 
1930 and their many friends a well- 
continued on Page 2) 



-O- 



The commencement recital, held 
Monday evening, June 9, in Engle 
Hall, was a brilliant success as the 
season's best talent was arrayed in 
most artistic review. 
Hilda Hess and Mildred Myers, or- 
ganists, displayed feats of skill as 
well as fine musicianship. The sing- 
ers, Leah Miller, sopi-ano, and Irene 
Peters, contralto, were at their best 
in their various interpretations. 
June Gingrich added variety to the 
program with two well rendered vlo- j 
lin solos. The pianists, Olive Weigel, | 
Alcesta Slichter, and Mary K. Gosh- 
ert, played with brilliance and fire as 
well as depth of feeling. A novel 
feature was the famous Aresby Valse 

1 

for two pianos played by Hilda Hess 
and Alcesta Slichter. 

Most of these musicians made their 
last appearance on the Lebanon Val- 
ley recital platform on this occasion, 
which proved to be a very fitting cli- 
max to their college careers. 



PRIZES AWARDED TO 
HONOR STUDENTS 



ANNUAL AWARDS MADE 
AT COMMENCEMENT 
EXERCISES 



Numerous prizes are awarded each 
year at the commencement exercises 
to the students whom the faculty 
consider the worthiest for receiving 
these established awards. This year 
the honors have been distributed ac- 
cording to the list below. 

Senior Scholastic Prize — Gladys 
Marjorie Knaub, Mount Wolf, Pa.; 

Junior Scholastic Prize — Ethel 
Mae Hower, Lebanon, Pa.; Honorable 
Mention — Russell Emerich Etter, 
Hummelstown, Pa. 

Sophomore Scholastic Prize — Ann 
Augusta Esbenshade, Lebanon, Pa.; 

Freshman Scholastic Prize — Kath- 
ryn Anna Leisey, Lebanon, Pa.; 
Max F. Lehman Mathematics Prize — 

Carl Russell Myers, Annville, Pa.; 
Scholastic Prize in Bible — Albert Le- 

roy Sitlinger, Lykens, Pa. 

(Continued' on Page 2) 



Another chapter in the history of 
Lebanon Valley was completed as 
eighty-seven seniors were graduated 
at the sixty-fourth annual com- 
mencement of the college held in the 
United Brethren Church Wednesday 
morning at 10 o'clock. This is the larg- 
est class to be sent forth to join the 
ever-increasing ranks of Lebanon 
Valley alumni. Four graduate stu- 
dents were granted the Master's de- 
gree and five honorary Doctor's de- 
grees were conferred. 

Dr. John A. H. Keith, Superinten- 
dent of Education of the State of 
Pennsylvania, was the commence- 
ment orator. In this the final mes- 
sage to the graduates the speaker 
disproved the idea of the self-made 
man. Each one, Dr. Keith stated, 
had an indebtedness to his immed- 
iate contracts and to his forefathers 
who have contributed to raising the 
standards of our environment, for 
enviornment is the potent force that 
shapes human lives. The students 
were shown their obligations to hu- 

O 

SENIORS CAST LOTS 

IN VARIOUS FIELDS 



As Lebanon Valley sends the larg- 
est class in its history to join its 
cohorts of alumni, the student group 
will find itself scattered over the pro- 
fession of teaching, in graduate work 
leading to the medical profession and 
to the ministry, and in commercial 
organizations. 

The majority of the students will 
be teaching. The following have al- 
ready been located in teaching posi 
tions, while the locations of the re- 
maining prospective teachers are not 
yet definitely decided: 
Louise Boughter, Lebanon Junior 

H. S. 

Ruth Cooper, Westville H. S., West- 

ville, N. Y. 
Helen Hain, Quarryville H. S. (Pa.) 
Elizabeth Hoy, Hershey H. S. 
Gladys Knaub, Rothsville H. S. (Pa.) 
Leah Miller, Whitehall Township 

H. S., Allentown, Pa. 
Mildred Myers, Annville H. S. 
Ruth Parnell, Houtsdale H. S. (Pa.) 
Irene Peter, Morgantown H. S. (Pa.) 
Mary Rank, Manheim H. S. (Pa.) 
Madeline Rife, Millersville H. S. (Pa.) 
Edgar Shroyer, Towanda H. S. (Pa.) 
Maryellen Witmer, Fulton H. S., 

Peachbottom, Pa. 
Blanche Cochran, Paradise H. S. 

(Pa.) 

Robert Jacks, Tower City H. S. (Pa.) 
Glenn Bendigo,Reinerton H. S. (Pa.) 
Frank Gaviofano, Lod'i Jr. H. S., 

Lodie, N. C. 
Hilda Hess, Music Supervisor, 

Waynesboro H. S. (Pa.) 
Olive Weigel, Music Supervisor 1 , 

Johnstown H. S. (Pa.) 

The Department of Business Ad- 
ministration will send forth a record 

(Continued on Page 2) 



manity. It is their duty not only 
to maintain the high level reached, 
but to raise it ever higher. College 
is not the end of education, but is the 
beginning of wanting to learn more, 
stated Dr. Keith, and showed from 
his own experience that life never 
ceases to be a university education. 

The following degrees were con- 
fered by the college: 
HONARARY DEGREES: 

John A. H. Keith, Harrisburg, Pa., 
Doctor of Laws; Raymond Philip 
Doughtery, New Haven, Conn., Doc- 
tor of Laws; Alfred Tennyson Sum- 
mer, Freetown W. Africa, Doctor of 
Literature; William Algernon Sites, 
Latrobe, Pa., Doctor of Divinity; 
Charles Edgar Roth, Reading., Doc- 
tor of Divinity. 
MASTER OF ARTS: 

Faber E. Stengle, Hummelstown, 
Pa. 

MASTER OF SCIENCE: 

Stella Minerva Hughes, Annville, 
Pa., Thomas Elmer Moser, Muir, Pa., 
Paul Hertzler Stern, Elizabeth, Pa. 

(Continued on Page Four) 

O 



CLASS DAY CLIMAXES 
SENIORS' ACTIVITIES 



GRADS LEAVE LIBERAL 
LEGACIES, FATES 
PROPHECY 



The class of 1930 climaxed four 
years of campus activity in the an- 
nual Class Day exercises which be- 
gan with the Ivy oration early yes- 
terday morning and ended with the 
formal class day program at two 
o'clock in the afternoon in the Engle 
Conservatory. 

Alcesta Slichter's novelty arrange- 
ment of "Where Do We Go From 
Here", followed! by the class song 
writted by Ruth Cooper, Olive Wei- 
gel, and Hilda Hilda Hess, opened 
the program. 

Turning back the college clock 10 
1866, a group depicted social life as 
it must have been at that time. By 
a sudden shift of the clock, the audi- 
ence was carried forward to 1950 to 
watch another group show the 
things which are to come. 

With another abrupt change the 
Senior players brought the clock back 
to normalcy and produced "A Girl To 
Order." 

Pauline Schaeffer maintained the 
high standards set by the prior work 
in the program when she presented 
the class poem. 

A novel method of presenting the 
class will delighted the audience. The 
antics of Judge Rearick, Attorneys 
Shenk and Road's, Widow Smyser and 
Baby Slichter, and witnesses Kauff- 

(Contiued on Page 2) 



PAGE TWO 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, JUNE 12, 1930. 



|£a T$u (Eallegiemie 



ESTABLISHED 1926 



A weekly publication by the Under- 
rraduate Students of Lebanon 
Valley College 



ALUMNI ISSUE 



The staff in charge of this the first 
alumni issue of LA VIE COL- 
LEGIENNE are: 

Esther Angstadt Editor-in-Chief 

Gladys Knaub .Associate Editor 

Calvin Keene Associate Editor 

GENERAL REPORTERS 
Warren Buirtner, Akesta Slichter„ 
Grace Keener. 

John Snyder Business Manager 

William Myers . ..Circulation Manager 

FACULTY ADVISORS 

Dr. Paul A. W. Wallace, English Dept. 
Uias Mary K. Wallace, English Dept. 
Dr. Paul S. Wagner. Math. Dept. 

LA VIE COLLEGIENNE. a member 
of the Intercollegiate Newspaper Asso- 
ciation of the Middle Atlantic States. 

Single Copies IP cents 

Subscription $1.50 per year 

Entered at the Annville, Pa., post- 
office as second class matter under the 
Act of March 3. 1879. 



AT THE SKYLINE 



"Though you live in the heart of a 
forest, if you have something the 
world wants it will cut a path to 
'your door," is the optimistic senti- 
ment of some anonymous soothsayer. 
The 1930 humorist has interpreted 
this same idea in his own concrete 
way: "Though you live in the heart 
of a forest, if you make a better 
mousetrap than anybody else, the 
world will cut its own path to your 
door." 

And are you of that species of 
"fish" among whom such a "line" 
proves good "bait"? This is the age 
of mass, production in mouse traps, 
in education, in every other mention- 
able line. One might live in the cen- 
ter of a forest with millions of the 
best conceivable mousetraps piled up 
high among the trees. However, 
that mousetrap genius will nevier 
sell one trap until he cuts his own 
way into the centers of men and 
proves to prospective customers that 
his is the best among fifty or more 
patents. Did the world cut a path to 
Fulton's door and didn't he have 
something the world wanted, or at 
least should have wanted if it un- 
derstood progress ? Fulton even 
traveled to France, exhibited his 
idea of the steam boat to Napoleon 
who at that time dreamed only of 
crippling England as "Mistress of the 
Seas." Yet, Napoleon saw the in- 
vention and scorned Fulton, this man 
who cut his own way out of the for- 
est. 

We have arrived at the skyline, the 
horizon marking the commencement 
of our careers toward which we have 
been looking since our freshman days. 
We have been exposed to education; 
we should have indirectly become cul- 
tured, as a result of our education. We 
think we have something the world 
is clamoring for — trained minds. But 
the world is a complacent spot. Did 
the Americans in the pre-Civil War 
days think they needed Lincoln? No. 
Lincoln hewed his own way out of 
the woods, like Fulton, and it re- 
quired a great many stump speeches 
before even a part of the country 
were aroused out of their compla- 
cency to free the negro. 

And so it is with the graduate. 
Every last one of us has a battle to 
fight. The professional world sighs 
as we try to wedge ourselves into Its 
crowded ranks. However, the man 
or woman who does not shy at com- 
petition, but who has the spirit to 
fight for his place according to the 
ethics of good; sportsmanship, is 
bound to succeed eventually. 

The Knock of Opportunity is a good 
name for a character in an allegory, 



but it makes a distorted piece of 
realism. In fact, if there are no 
wood-cutters blazing a trail to our 
cabin, how can we ever expect op- 
portunity to knock at the door? 
Again we will crash a beautiful-but- 
dumb idol of our mind. Opportunity 
does not come disguised as a knock. 
Opportunity is buried beneath the 
earth like the valuable minerals, and 
we will only arrive at the precious 
metal by hunting and then digging 
for it. Labor omnia vincit was as 
true 2,000 years ago when it was 
first written as it is today. 

O 

"CONTINUEZ-VOUS" 



The wearing of the cap and gown 
by graduating classes is undoubtedly 
one of the most impressive traditions 
that colleges follow. The seniors 
present an unbroken somberness, 
pervaded with an air of dignity. It 
is, however, in the faculty group 
that one sees the true glamour that 
the intensive pursuit of knowledge 
casts over the persevering scholar. 
The baccalaujeate degree is but the 
beginning with the doctor's hood 1 at 
the peak of achievement. 

Who can look upon the faculty at 
a college commencement without be" 
ing impressed with the glow of 
pagentry which the colorful sym- 
bols of their scholastic attainments 
represent? The hoods of various 
brilliant hues, each distinctive of the 
espective universities that have 
conferred them and symbolizing the 
garb of the scholars in robe and cowl 
who traveled during the mediaeval 
..ges from educational center to edu- 
cational center, give to the faculty 
doctors and professors prestige and 
distinction. 

Perhaps the best slogan one can 
take for himself as he reaches the 
jrossways at commencement, and the 
one which our college doctors con- 
sciously or from an instinctive urge 
for knowledge have followed, is the 
dvice that the art instructor gives 
laisie in Kipling's '"'The Light that 
Failed". "Continuez-vous" the in- 
structor repeats again and again to 
Maisie as she works away at her 
canvases. The college doctors and 
professors have done that. The bril- 
liant hoods are their symbolic re- 
wards. 

Whether we aspire to the doctor's 
degree or to commercial success the 
artist's advice is ever true — "Con- 
tinuez-vous" to study, to learn. 
Knowledge has no boundaries; it is 
I ke space, limitless. Success is to 
the persistent. 

O 

THE COMPLETED CYCLE 

Seniors should have attained a 
point far distant from their days of 
"the wearing of the green," for col- 
lege days are meant to indicate prog- 
ress. Nevertheless, the seniors 
found themselves this week exactly 
where they were when trains puffed 
on their way to their destinations 
and left them stranded at the sta- 
tion or parents abandoned them in 
their dormitory rooms on the opening 
day back in '26. It was a big, empty, 
lonesome world then, and so it was 
this week. 

The freshman sighs for the good 
old high school days; the senior 
reminisces on the good old freshman 
days. The freshman longs for the 
friends back home; the senior wishes 
the other classmen hadn't gone home 
(for the senior in spite of his steady 
rise in this world has ever remained 
a gregarious animal). 

The juniors are the first to begin 
the homeward hegira. They pack be- 
fore the last exam and leave imme- 
diately after. Nothing would induce 
them to remain for commencement, 
for they haven't liked these seniors 
since their frosh days. The sophomores 
are more kindly disposed. This is 
shown by the large number of 



•sophomer-senior combinations among 
the cross-country hikers. The frosh 
are still closely bound to the home 
soil and leave pronto before the ink 
is dry on the last blue book. Further- 
more, the yearlings like to do as 
their friends the juniors. 

Meanwhile the seniors wait — wait 
like so many criminals for the fatal 
moment. They wait around the cam- 
pus for three or four days with not a 
single thing to do, especially when 
the rain spoils the tennis courts and 
keeps the hikers off the highroads. 
As the grand finale to a flashy be- 
ginning four years ago, they fall in 
line, decked in the traditional sombre 
robe, and begin the march toward 
the pile of diplomas. 

The senior ends his journey just 
where he began it. The frosh and 
the senior both face new adaptations 
in life. The frosh wearing the green 
dink and the senior in cap and gown 
are both more or less bewildered by 
the unfamiliar conditions that face 
them. And not enough underclass- 
men stay around the campus to wit- 
ness and enjoy this college phenom- 
enon — when the bewildered seniors, 
disrobed of their seniority and dig- 
nity, are poured pell-mell Into the 
rushing world. 

O 

YALE DOCTOR SPEAKS 

AT BACCALAUREATE 



(Continued from Page i) 



planned and challenging message 
which may well serve as their final 
stimulus to enter Life with a real 
purpose. 

The speaker based his sermon on 
Toshua 13:1 — "There remaineth . yet 
very much land to be possessed." 
This verse was fittingly applied to 
"Humanity's unfinished task" which 
lies before those just leaving col- 
lege. He disproved the not infre- 
quent assertion that little which re- 
quires new and ingenious talent is 
still left to be done. Although 
science has recently made great 
progress, it was forcibly maintain- 
ed that there are many untold 
ppcrtunities in that almost new 
rid that the industrial world in its 
m^ettled condition needs leaders with 
new ideas and great foresight, that 
civil life can be greatly improved, 
and that much remains to be done in 
"ioVn'ng and strengthening the re- 
Mpious and moral field. 

In this still unconquered realm 
there loom up specific problems 
V ruth of today msut prepare to meet. 
First of these is the ever increasing 
social situation of our modern life 
necessitating leadership and thought 
on the problem created by environ- 
menal influences. Perhaplsi greater 
than this is the complex condition 
in the physical realm, growing out 
of the materialistic and mechanistic 
tendencies of this age. 

In contrast with these definite prob- 
lems are the more abstract factors 
which will determine the success of 
those endeavoring to solve them. The 
speaker stressed personality as the 
most potent driving force in every- 
thing. Along with this factor ranks 
ithe religious phase of human life — 
the standards of which have been 
proven long ago and therefore can- 
not be carelessly pushed off for 
something new. It is for the in- 
dividual to decide whethpr he will 
face the unfinifshed task with the 
dynamic of a spiritual life or strug- 
gle along unaided. 

To the class of 1930. then, comes 
the same challenge as Joshua heard, 
along with the exhortation to "Be 
strong and of a good courage; be not 
a 'raid or dismayed for the Lord is 
with thee wheresoever thou goest." 

A student choir assisted by Mildred 
Meyers '30, organist, Irene Peter '30, 
soloist, and directed by Prof. Craw- 
ford added greatly to the devotional 
atmosphere of the service. 



CLASS DAY CLIMAXES 

SENIORS' ACTIVITIES 



(Continued from Page One) 



man, and Keener kept the listeners 
in an uproar until the Judge allowed 
Attorney Rhoads to read the will. 

A beautiful Blue and' White silk 
flag, bearing the college seal, was 
the gift of the class to the school. 
Dr. Gossard, on behalf of the college, 
accepted the gift and warmly thank- 
ed the class for it. 

When all bequests had been given 
and received, three witches, who 
seemed to have stepped from the 
pages of Shakespeare, ushered in 
the "Three Sisters" who spun out 
the future of the members of the 
class. Parts in this presentation 
were ably taken by Anne Gordon, 
Dolores Gregory, Helen Hand, Ruth 
Cooper, Margaret Smyser, and Mrs. 
Stone. 

The Alma Mater concluded the 
program in the chapel and the class 
filed out to the campus where Homer 
Allwein presented! the class mantle 
to Robert Roudabush, '31. 

The class of 1930 is to be congrat- 
ulated on its fine showing in one of 
its last public appearances as a cam- 
pus organization. 

Class Prophecy 

Note in Hummelstown News: 

Dr. and Mrs. Witmer Allwein have 
returned from visiting their twins, 
Ann and Witmei*, Jr., who are at- 
tending L. V. C. Dr. Allwein is Hum- 
melisftown's mayor and foremost 
physician. They were accompanied 
by Mr. "Fuzz" Jacks, Supt. of Pub- 
lic Instruction, Harrisburg, Penna. 

Miss Bernita Strebig has been 
electedl to membership in the Stage 
and Screen Club; she was deemed 
eligible because her temperament 
and past life has proven her 
worthy of membership. 

Mysticism has again come to the 
fore in accordance with the proph- 
ecy made by the Indian lecturer, 
when we were in college; Miss Ax 
has achieved fame as the one who 
disproved the theory of relativity. 

Miss Mary Ellen Witmer, coach of 
Woman's football at Peach Bottom, 
has chosen as her very able assistant 
Miss Ruth March. 

Miss Mary McCurdy, Dean of 
Girls in one of our H. S. advocates 
bigger and better "labs" in social 
centers for pupils with vacant pe- 
riod; this inspiration was received in 
the "labs" of L. V. C. She considers 
this a great improvement over the 
old fashioned study-hall. 

Miss Grace Keener has been hon- 
ored by having the new non-winding 
victrola named after her — "the 
Keenerola." Miss Keener insists up- 
on sharing the honor with Misses 
Parnell and Slichter. 

Miss Esther Angstadt, the "Schol- 
ar Gypsy," is still at the height of 
her fame as a soothsayer and stu- 
dent. 

Those who saw the play entitled 
"Seven Keys to Baldpate", would be 
amazed at the almost prophetic in- 
terpretation of the character role 
played by Mr. C. Paul Barnhart. The 
politician is concerned not with the 
Traction Co., but with the bus ser- 
vice between Hagerstown and Jersey. 

Ann Gordon becomes a chief 
telephone operator (and is now teach- 
ing her method of "suspending a 
line.") 

"Mickey" Cochran is directing the 
angel scene in Wonder Brothers new 
all-talking, all-singing production. 
Miss Cochran received her experience 
while teaching in "Paradise"— Penn- 
sylvania. 

"Johnny" Snyder has at last found 
his way having lost it the night of 
the Sr. Party at L. V. He is now 
radio announcer over station "Ku- 
Ku". 

Miss Gladys Knaub, assistant 



"snupervisor" of the Beatty Corre. 
spondence School, is spending ^ 
summer over-hauling her "Chevy" 
and is learning to change a tire more 
efficiently. 

"Willie" Myers has taken to soap, 
box oratory; he is exhorting the men 
of the community to spend their 
evenings at home or to take their 
wives with them, even to lodge meet- 
ings. 

There has been such a listless feel, 
ing on the campus that the author, 
ities have decided to use drastic 
measures to avoid a slump in the 
morale of the student body; they 
have invited back "Micky" Toranto 
to spend a couple of weeks livening 
things up at his Alma Mater. 

Hertzler's Ford is still running; it 
is an illustration of perpetual mo- 
tion; we believe it is running on im- 
petus, or perhaps it illustrates the 
theory of attraction. 

(J 

SENIORS CAST LOTS 

IN VARIOUS FIELDS 



(Continued from Page 1) 
group. Every man has secured a po- 
sition with a business organization. 
Several students in other depart- 
ments have also secured commercial 
positions. The future business men 
include: 

Roy Albright, A. T. & T. Co. 
Warren E. Burtner, American Alum- 
inum Co. 

George Rhoads, Kresge Five & Ten 
Cent Store. 

Harold Lee Gingrich, Chemist, Amer- 
ican Aluminum Co. 

Homer Allwien, A. T. & T. Co., New 
York City. 

Alfred Barnhart, Curtis Publishing 
Co., Philadelphia. 

Luther Rearick, American Aluminum 
Co., New Kensington, Pa. 
Those who will take graduate work 

at higher institutions are: 

Charles Fink, Civil Engineering, 
Penn State. 

Edgar Hertzler, Bonebrake Theolog- 
ical Seminary. 

Lester Kauffman, Bonebrake Theo- 
logical Seminary. 

Calvin Keene, Yale Divinity School, 
New Haven, Conn. 

Albert Sitlinger, Yale Divinity 
School. 

Witmer Allwein, Medical SchoJ 

Temple University. 
Dominic Bo vino, Medical School. 
Rudy Cunjak, Medical School. 
Joseph Fiorello, Medical School. 
Marion Heaps, Medical School. 
Clarence Noll, Trinity College 

Hartford, Conn. 
Miiohael Taronto, Medical School, 

Temple University. 
' Miss Kathryn Hagner will be on 
the staff of the Reading Hospital 

O 

PRIZES AWARDED TO 

HONOR STUDENTS 



(Continued from Page One) 



Student Activities Prize— Esther 

Angstadt, Reading, Pa. 
Scholastic Prize in Political Science 

—Paul Ira Kleinfelter, Middletown, 

Pa. 

Scholastic Prize in History— Gladys 
Marjorie Knaub, Mount Wolf, P a - 
Sophomore Scholastic Prize in Eng- 



lish Literature — Ann Augusta 



,rabl e 



benshade, Lebanon, Pa.; HonoraW 
Mention— Ruth Muriel Agen, ^ eD ' 
anon, Pa. 
Freshman Anthology Prize— Wal^ 
1 Otto Krumbiegel, Hillside, N. 
Honorable Mention — Marion Win 
fred Kruger, Carlisle, Pa. > 
Biological Scholarship Prize— R ot>e 

Lee Roudabush, Minersville, P a - ^ 
Medical Scholarship Prize— R usS 

Evan Morgan, Minersville, Pf- ^ 
Science Soholarishp Prize— . 
Elizabeth Heaps, Palmyra, £ 
Honorable Mention— Kathryn 
' riet Hagner, Reading, Pa. 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, JUNE 12, 1930. 



PAGE- THREE 



he 
,>> 

i 

>r e 

ip. 

^en 
eir 
eir 
et- 

sel- 
or- 
itic 
the 
ley 
nto 
mg 

: it 
10- 

the 



DS 



po- 
ion. 
irt- 
:ial 
nen 



im- 

Ten 
ler- 
tew 
ting 

turn 

rork 
ing, 
log- 
leo- 
iool, 
nity 

lOJ 



ege 

tool, 

on 
jital 

ITS 

ither 

ence 
own» 

adp 
i. 

Bng- 
£s- 

•abl e 
ilter 

J.; 

a- 

pa-! 




"A COLLEGE JOKE TO CURE THE 'BLUES' 



— Jonathan Swift. 



The fates were busily weaving their tapestries of human destinies: 
Xenophon was doomed to banishment and Socrates to drinking the 
hemlock. 

Mary McCurdy and Irene Peter conscientionsly paid the penalties for 
the use of EXTREME slang. 

The Seniors looked at Cochran and said, "WHAT a Freshman!" The 
Juniors indifferently, "She'll calm down," the sophs, "Wait 'till we get her," 
and the frosh inter se, "The best scout in our lot." 

Hertzler impersonated a graceful nymph (And How) on an activities 
morning in chapel. 

Frosh I. Q. showed boys were best students. 

Frosh chemists addressed by Dr. Bender: We'll continue the study of 
poisons. The class will please take arsenic for tomorrow. 

"Candidates are being sought for membership into 'Wide Open Spaces 
Club', a new organization on the campus," stated Kampus Kracks of Oct. 
28, 1926. Judging by the hikers of one sort or another which 1930 has pro- 
duced, the campaign was a success. 

\ J < JIEggie" Shroyer wondered why they called an "L" club initiation a 
Board Meeting — until he got there! 

No wonder frosh are bewildered by the queer way they do things in 
college. Said Prof. Grimm to a frosh group of mathematicians as he was 
explaining a problem, "Now watch the board while I go through it." 



COLLEGE ENDOWMENT 

NEARS MILLION MARK 



1930 CANDIDATES FOR L. VS. HALL OF FAME 

"Jap" Albright — The man on the campus who was seen most but heard 
least. 

Homer Allwein — The first King Winter to share honors with a May 
Queen. 

Anne Hershey — The only commuter who never missed a train. 
Fae Bachman — A modern Cinderella (at the last stroke of twelve Fae 
was still dancing.) 

Betty Black — A blonde whom "gentlemen prefer." 

Kitty Hagner — The class scientist! (She carries around mice as other 
girls do hankerchiefs.) 

Zechman — A women-hater cured by a frosh co-ed. 
Joe Yake — The Queen of the prom(enade)s. 

Mildred Myers — This is the era of equal rights. Ecce femina! The next 
Paderewski! 

Mike Toronto — The man about town. (How about it!) 
"Dusty" Rhoads — The David Garrick of the Pennway coffee house. 
Sitlinger — The abused head waiter! No umpire weathered so much con- 
tumely. 

j?iOi.eii^ — The gentleman with the Pepsodent smile. 
Joiui any tier — ihe local Will Rogers. 

—LVC— 
"THE OLD ORDER CHANGETH" 



Tastes change with the passing of time. Today a fellow may preier 
a green tie (especially if he's a frosh) and tomorrow a red one; today he 
may prefer a brunette and tomorrow a blonde. Psychologists, perhaps, 
cannot account lor this phenomenal change in tastes. At any rate, here's 
the "dirt": _kJL 
frosh Banquet lineup — Jan. 3, 1927. 

Lucile Horst — Cy Shenk 
Mildred Saylor — Frank Barnhart 
Olive Weigel — Edgar Shroyer 
Christine Binner — Homer Allwein 
Josephine Yake — Sam. Zappia 
Chas. Fink — Mary Showers 
Marion Light — Lloyd Weber 
Mary McCurdy — Ed. Hertzler 
Madeline Rife — Cal. Keene 
Kitty Hagner — Willie Myers 
Alcesta Slichter — Fritz Rhoades 
"Eddie" Baker— Clarence Noll 
Irene Peters — Jim Hazelton 
Imagine the following couples! They started' their course in campuso- 
%y at the freshman hike in the fall of 1926. 

Mary Ellen Witmer — Edgar Hertzler 
Mildred Saylor — Frank Hoffman 
Madeline Rife — Cal. Keene 
Irene Peters — Dominic Bovino 
"Red" Weigle— "Eggie" Shroyer 
Mary Showers — Charles Fink 
Hilda Hess — Paul Barnhart 
Violet Feree — Ralph Sprecher 
Sue Wishart — Ray Vaughn 
Gladys Knaub — Jim. Hazelton 
Anne Gordon — Lloyd Weber 
Mary McCurdy — William Lebo 
Incidentally, the chaperones were Prof. Grimm, Mr. and Mrs. Ham- 
m °H and Miss Myers. They all failed to arrive. 

— LVC— 

THE SENIORS FOUR YEARS AGO 



Witmer, Kraub and Copenhaver had "boy bobs" 
'Jap" Albright: Hully-che! I didn't know they were allowed to throw 
* at er around here. 

Olive Morrow thought "hops" were dances. 

Mike Toranto decided to major in the extra-curricular science of Joke 
01 ogy. 

'Barney" and Billy Myers, without considering the Men's Senate, be- 
^ m e "shieks amoung the ladies" too prematurely. For six days Barnre 
° re cans around his neck and Myers polished the shoes of upperclass- 
en on North Hall steps each noon and evening. 



CLASS SONG OF 1930 



By Ruth Cooper 

We love our Alma Mater 
And reverence her name 
God grant her lamp may ever 
Burn a brighter, purer flame! 
We love each sprig of ivy 
With mem'ries intertwined 
Each cozy bit of woodland 
The Quittie, willow-lined. 

But 

Dear old 1930, to you 
Now we sing our praise! 
Dear old 1930, to you 
Giver of happy days; 
Dear old 1930, we love, 
The gayest and the best. 
With nineteen hundred thirty 
We face time and its test! 

II 

The rose of nineteen-thirty 
Has a fragrance all its own 
And when it comes to comrades 
Not a finer crowd is known. 
We join our hands in friendship 
Loyal to white and blue — 
And never once forgetting 
"To thine own self be true!" 

So— 

(Chorus— Dear old 1930, (etc.) 
O ■ 



CLASS POEM 



By Pauline Schaeffer, '30 

We have come to the end of a lovely 
road, 

A road whose every mile 
Has been paved with friendships 
true and sweet, 

A word of cheer and a kindly smile. 
We wish we might return again, 
Return, when the night is falling, 
To a dear old place called L. V. C. 
But other roads are calling. 

II 

These newer roads may lead us far 
Over vale and hill and mountain: 
Newer things we are going to seek, 
Perhaps e'en youth's eternal foun- 
tain. 

These roads may lead us through all 

the world, 
Away from familiar places, 
Into a land of stranger things 
Stranger tongues and scenes and 
faces. 



Ill 

But they tell us there yet is another 
road 

Called the road to yesterday: 
And the way to find this quaint old 
road 

Is through the paths of memory. 
So, far ahead in the future years, 
When we've traveled all other ways, 
We shall turn our steps to the shad- 
owy path 
That leads to our yesterdays. 

IV 

Today we graduate with such high 
hopes, 

We do not think of fears. 
As we look ahead, the road of life 
Holds only smiles throughout the 
years. 

It beckons ever and lures us on 
Into an unknown land. 
Why should we fear when, with a 
smile, 

Life waits with an outstretched 
hand? 



Yes, we graduate with these high 
hopes, 

And then we hesitate and see 
That classes and lessons must go on 
Throughout the years to be. 
That we shall never graduate until 
The Teacher of Life shall say, "Well 
done" 

And hands, with a smile-, our di 
ploma; 

Only then shall we know we have 
won. 

VI 

Today we graduate from L. V. C. 
And we enter another school; 
The school which is called the School 
of Life, 

Where fairness in strife is the rule 
We shall need to learn newer lessons 
'Till the eternal June is in flower. 
And will only receive our diploma 
When we enter eternity's door. 

VII 

To the Juniors, Sophomores and 

Freshmen 
We can say only, "Carry on" 
Although we are leaving the battle 

scene 

The fight is by no means won. 
In you we are placing all our hopes 
And we ask that you bear unstained 
The glorious banner of L. V. C. 
Given by those who her heights have 
attained. 



(Continued from Page i) 



The Department of Modern Lan- 
guages will be enlarged by adding a 
professor of German language and 
Literature. The Conservatory is ex- 
panding its offerings in Public 
School Music as a professor of meth- 
ods assume her duties next fall. The 
third new position will provide in- 
struction for men in hygiene and ad- 
ditional work in the Department of 
Education. 

A comparison of Lebanon Valley's 
$910,000 endowment with the endow- 
ments of other well known colleges 
proves the favorable rank of this in- 
stitution. Although the figures be- 
low are based on 1928 statistics, very 
few of this group have engaged In 
endowment campaigns since that 
time and the sums are consequently 
quite fairly accurate. Allegheny 
College had at that time an endow- 
ment of $1,500,000, Bucknell $1,250,- 
000, Elizabethtown $250,000, Gettys- 
burg $800,000, Juniata $700,000, 
Muhlenberg $841,000, Susquehanna 
$365,000, Ursinus $413,000, and Wil- 
son $668,000. 

The present fund owes its exis- 
tence to two campaigns that were 
launched among United Brethren 
churches and to the success of Dr. 
Gossard in securing the recognition 
and aid of the Rockefeller Founda- 
tion. The latter organization con- 
tributed $175,000 when the sum of 
$350,000 was raised by the churches. 
The first campaign among the 
churches was led by the Honorable 
A. S. Kreider, who was then Presi- 
dent of the Board of Trustees and 
the chairman of the general execu- 
tive committee, in 1917J918. The 
second campaign in 1924-1925 was 
completed by J. Raymond Engle who 
succeeded Mr. Kreider as President 
of the Board of Trustees upon his 
death. In addition to the endowment 
contribution, the Rockefeller Foun- 
dation gave to this college $8,000 a 
year toward faculty salaries during 
1923, 1924 and 1925. 

The financial status of the college 
at present is absolutely without debt. 
Furthermore, the endowment sub- 
scriptions have been paid and the 
fund has been converted into Invest- 
ments with a yield of over five per 
cent. This sum will be used for cur- 
rent expenses and improvements. 

Due to the advanced standing 
which the increase in operating cap- 
ital has made it possible to attain, 
Lebanon Valley is recognized as stan- 
dard by the State Department of 
Education in Harrisburg and the na- 
tional department in Washington. It 
is also on the list accredited by the 
Association of College and Secondary 
Schools of the Middle States and 
Maryland. 

O 




Miss Kathryn Bork '29 will study 
art in New York City this summer. 

H. Darkes Albright '28 begins his 
work this summer toward a Master's 
degree at Cornell University and will 
continue there during the winter ses- 
sion. He plans to take his degree in 
English and will also study play pro- 
duction in connection with his Mas- 
ter's work. 

Miss Miriam Hershey '29 will ma- 
triculate for the summer session at 
Columbia University for graduate 
work in Latin and English. 

After spending the past three 
months in Germany, Miss Eleanor 
Snoke '28 is expected to arrive home 
the middle of this month. 

Miss Kathryn Young '27 has se- 
cured a position as teacher of French 
on the summer school staff of the 
West Chester High School. 



PAGE FOUR 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, JUNE 12, 1930. 




CLASS OF 1930 



87 GRADUATE AT 

64TH COMMENCEMENT 

(Continued from Page One) 



BACHLOR OF ARTS: 

Roy Bishop Albright, Esther Ang- 
stadt, Mary Elizabeth Ax, Gladys 
Fae Bachman, Clarence Paul Barn- 
hart, Louise Hoffer Boughter, Doro- 
thy Marion Boyer, Warren Edward 
Burtner, Ruth Grace Cooper, Helen 
Elizabeth Copenhaver, Corinne Mar" 
garet Dyne, Charles Monroe Fink, 
Theodore Murray Focht, Dorothy Is- 
abella Gable, Anne Gordon,, Helen 
Rettew Hain, Anna Marquette Her- 
shey, George Edgar Hertzler, Dor- 
othy Elizabeth Hiester, Anna Eliza- 
beth Hoy, Elizabeth Dorothy Hyland, 
Lester Millard Kauffman, James Cal- 
vin Keene, Grace Elizabeth Keener, 
Gladys Marjorie Knaub, Ruth Evelyn 
March, Leah Anna Miller, Olive Mir- 
iam Morrow, Mildred Elizabeth Myers, 
William Jacob Myers, Ruth Elizabeth 
Parnell, Irene Bauchman Peter, 
Mary Elizabeth Rank, George Fred- 
erick Rhoads, Meredith Ada Rice, 
Elva Mae Riegel, Madeline Anna 
Rife, Pauline Lehman Schaeffer, Cy- 
rus Alfred Shenk, Mary Elizabeth 
Showers, Alvin Edgar Shroyer, Jr., 
Albert Leroy Sitlinger, Margaret 
Smyser, Mary Leah Snyder, Jane 
Horting Stone, Bemita Sheckard 
Strebig, Foster Grosh Ulrich, Mary 
Ellen Witmer, Harriet Josephine 
Yake, 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE: 

Joseph Witmer Allwein, Elizabeth 
Margaret Black, Dominic Anthony 
Bovino, Mary Blanch Cochran, Rudy 
Cunjack, Jos, Fiorello, Harold Ging- 
rich, Dolores Valinda Gregory, Kath- 
ryn Harriet Hagner, Helen Mae 
Hand, Marion Elizabeth Heaps, Rob- 
ert Wright Jacks, Mary Emerson 
McCurdy, Elwood William Meyers, 
Clarence Irvin Noll, Lewis Albert 
Renninger, Oscar Frank Stambaugh, 
Russel Rodger Stuckey, Michael Ta- 
ranto, Lloyd Martin Weber. 
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN 
ECONOMICS: 
Homer John Allwein, Alfred 
Charles Barnhart, Artyaneas Gideon 
Keener. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN 
EDUCATION: 
Mary Hessen Bechdolt, Glenn 
Emanuel Bendigo, Claire v ;Jane 
Brown, Mildred May Hackman, Mary 
Agnes Meehan, Margaret Anna Rick- 
abaugh, Mildred Harrison Sayior, 
Lloyd Cameron Shirk. 
DEGREES TO BE CONFERRED 
AUGUST, 1930: 
Bachelor of Arts: 

Josephine Mae Schell, Harry Wil- 
liam Zechman, 

Bachelor of Science in Education: 

Frank Gaciofano, Reba Elizabeth 
Logan, Iva Carrie Weirick. 
Bachelor of Science in Economics: 

Luther Malcolm Rearick. 
CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC: 

Hilda Irene Hess, Mary Alcesta 
Slichter, Olive Marie Weigel. 
Degree Cum Laude: 

Robert Jacks, Gladys Knaub, Mil- 
dred Myers, Mrs. Jane Stone. 

— O 

ALUMNI HAVE ANNUAL 

MEETING ON CAMPUS 



At a meeting of the Lebanon Val- 
ley College Alumni Association, held 
Tuesday, June 10, Professor J. Wal- 
ter Esbenshade, local stationer and 
former high school principal, was e- 
lected president. He takes the place 
Df the former president Rev. D. G. 
E. Youjng otf H'arri/sbui\?. 

Beas G. Light, head' of a coal com- 
pany salesoffice in Lebanon, was 
named as a member of the executive 
committee. Miss Alma Light, of Ann- 
ville, a member of the Annville High 
School faculty, and J. T. Starr, teach- 
er in the same high school, were also 
newly elected members of the exec- 
utive committee. 



200 MEMBERS GATHER 

AT ALUMNI BANQUET 

The annual Alumni Banquet was 
held! Wednesday night at 6:30 in the 
Annville High School gymnasium 
and was attended by over 200 grad- 
uates of Lebanon Valley. 

After an excellent meal, the "hos- 
ilities" were opened by D, E. Young 
'15, the retiring president of the as- 
sociation. After a few preliminary 
remarks he introduced the toastmas- 
:er of the evening, Earl E. Renn, '10 
Mr. Renn had' the usual line of witty 
remarks necessary for all good toast- 
nasters and intersperced the toasts 
with "congregational" singing. He 
first introduced Dr. Samuel H. Stein, 
'92 who spoke at length on the sub- 
ject "Think on These Things". 

A quartet composed of S. Donald 
Evans, '24; Edgar Shroyer, '30; Da- 
vid! Shroyer, '26; and Paul Strickler, 
'14 sang three selections which were 
very well received. The female mem- 
bers of the alumni were well repre- 
sented by Edna Groff Deihl, '00 on 
"Tit for Tat". Miss Leah Miller, '30 
delighted the group with two soprano 
selections. 

Mr. E. E. Mylin broke his charac- 
teristic silence and' made a reputa- 
tion for himself as a public speaker 
as the faculty representative. Edgar 
Shroyer, representing the graduating 
?lass, spoke very well and briefly, 
thanking the alumni for their wel- 
come to the class of '30. 

O 

ALUMNUS IS GRANTED 

FOREIGN FELLOWSHIP 



Orin James Farrel of the class of 
1921 will receive his Ph. D. degree 
in mathematics at Harvard at the 
coming commencement. He has been 
appointed Rockefeller International 
Research Fellow in mathematics for 
a period of twelve months to do re- 
search work at the University of 
Munich under the direction of Pro- 
fessor Constantin Caratheodory. The 
subject of the proposed research is 
"Conformed Mapping and its Appli- 
cations." The fellowship pays $2400 
and all traveling expenses. 

About fifteen such fellowships in 
mathematics are awarded annually 
by the National Research .Council 
The fellows are selected! from appli- 
cants from all over the United States. 
Three or four of the fellows are sent 
abroad 1 ; the others work at American 
Universities. 



THREE PH. D'S. ARE 

ADDED TO FACULTY 

(Continued from Page 1) 



lege where he was an instructor for 
five years. He studied for his Ph. 
D. degree at the University of Penn- 
sylvania. Dr Ohl has been spending 
the past two years at the American 
Academy in Rome, Italy. While a- 
broad he has been travelling exten- 
sively both on the continent and in 
the historical areas of northern Af- 
rica. 

i To fill one of the new positions 
created on the faculty a former Leb- 
anon Valley man has been chosen. 
Professor LeRoy C. Machert attend- 
ed this school two years as an aca- 
demic and two years as a college stu- 
dent. Later, however, he secured his 
baccalaureate and his master's de- 
gree at the Maryland State College. 
Professor Mackert will receive his 
Ph. D. from Columbia University this 
autumn. He will be connected with 
the Department of Education and will 
have charge of the instruction in Hy- 
giene for men. 

Miss Mary Gillespie, who has made 
a complete study of Public School 
Music at Columbia University, has 
been added to the Conservatory fac- 
ulty as the instructress in methods 
of teaching public school music. Miss 
Gillespie was formerly a member of 
the faculty of the University of Del- 
aware. 

One substitution will be made in 
the faculty next autumn while a 
present member is on leave of ab- 
sence. Dr. Richie, professor of 
Bible and Greek, will study at the 
University of Pittsburgh next year 
for his Doctor of Philosophy degree. 
An alumnus, Bruce Behney '28, will 
fill his position during that time. Mr. 
Behney has been attending Bone- 
brake Theological Seminary the two 
years that have elapsed ; since his 
leaving this colelge; during his sen- 
ior year here he was assistant in 
the Department of Bible and New 
Testament Greek. 

— o— 

WEDDING BELLS 

Another campus romance will have 
its climax in the marriage ceremony 
when Miss Emmaline Shaffer '29 and 
Mr. Miller '28 will be married in the 
United Brethren Church, Annville, by 
Dr. J. O. Jones this afternoon, June 
11. Only a few relatives will be pres- 
ent at the ceremony. 



'30 SENIORS ARE GREEN 

BUT COURAGEOUS CROP 



The first two weeks of life at L. 
V. were hectic ones for the class of 
1930. Came the opening day, Sep- 
tember 23, and with it the boys blos- 
somed forth in green dinks with four 
inch extensions, black socks and ties, 
and green shipping tags which were 
to prevent any of them being lost. 
Before the opening exercises had 
commenced, the first fight had been 
i" ought and won. The Sophs tried to 
remove the '30 banner from the top 
of the heating plant stack. All that 
was removed was a lot of clothing 
and the Frosh went to chapel with 
their first battle won. That same 
morning the Frosh girls battled the 
Sophs on the second and third floors, 
front, of North Hall. The banner 
almost, but not quite, changed hands 
and our girls made the decision 
unanimous. 

The following Monday, September 
26, the class scrap took place below 
the Men's Dorm. The Frosh were 
given the almost impossible task of 
removing a banner from a pole heav- 
ily guarded by Sophs. '30 lost, but 
honorably. , 

The next night came the first real 
taste of initiation. Shrieks and 
howls disturbed the usual compari- 
tive quietness of the Men's Dorm 
and the yearlings marched around 
the campus to the tune of the milk 
and grass songs, which was followed 
by the usual proposals. A wet time 
was had by all. 

It is especially interesting to re- 
member the first Senate penalties. 
Jim Hazelton will long be remem- 
bered! for his mellow rendition of the 
Alma Mater on North Hall steps 



! 



I— 



each day at noon for a week. The 
general concensus of opinion was that 
he had discovered seven tunes for it 
and used a different one daily. Fior- 
ello, altho he did not make quite the 
same impression that Jim did, was 
received nevertheless with much ap- 
plause. Speaking of Joe brings up 
the time when he passed out sheets 
of Waldorf tissue to each person en- 
tering the hall at noon. His nose 
was painted a brilliant red and help- 
ed! along in the general effect. Heath 
joined the other sex for a week. Zap- 
pia carried an alarm clock to keep 
him awake and Hafer carried a sign 
and started six days of shipping. In 
the meantime the girls had had their 
take down at the hands of the Soph 
girls. It was then that the men of 
the college decided that at least 90% 
of a girl's beauty lies in her make- 
up. However that may be, after that 
day was over they wore green rib- 
bons for the rest of the semester. 

We must not forget the Soph Hike 
held Oct. 4 at the Union Water- 
works. Unfortunately the first year 
men arrived before the eats and the 
wise fools went hungry and girl- 
less. It is rumored that the Hertzler- 
Overly romance started at that time. 

The agitation proper ended with 
the Scrub Glee Club try-outs. 11 
speaks well for the musical ability 
of the class that all the men who 
tried out made the organization, ft 
was their liquid voices that did it. 

We almost forgot the Frosh hike. 
It was held the first week of school 
It seemed we wandered through 
briars, fields and' over creeks f° r 
and finally found ourselves at a fire 
with no idea of how it had all hap- 
pened. The Sophs did not bother tie 
and! since the chaperones could no 
find the crowd they did not either. 



The Alumni and Senior Staffs of LA VIE 
COLLEGIENNE appreciate the courtesy and co- 
operation which have at all times been extended 
to them by the printers, 

^VimittlU ~prinhtt3 do. 

of LA VIE COLLEGIENNE.